National Action Plan: Niger

The Niger Government adopted its first NAP for the period 2017-2019. The drafting of the NAP was coordinated by the Ministry of Population, Women's Empowerment and Child Protection, civil society organisations, NGOs, and technical and financial partners. The eight regions of Niger were consulted, and the document remains to be validated by representatives of all eight regions of Niger. Overall, the Niger NAP is organised with a very extensive introduction and context section. The NAP is then structured into priority chapters with objectives, results, actions, indicators, targets, and those responsible for the objectives. There is a detailed budget chapter, as well as a follow-up and monitoring chapter.

Niger faces many different types of conflict situations. The NAP mentions that security operations weigh heavily on public finances, and the state has had to multiple their military investments by 15 since 2010. While this has had an unfortunate impact on all socio-economic sectors in the country, disarmament is not mentioned. Niger faces the following issues, resulting in conflict: lack of access to natural resources; lack of access to public resources, including the redistribution of income from extractive industries; a demographic dividend and marginalisation of women and youth; weak governance, social tensions and the recurrence of of political and institutional instability; armed conflicts including armed rebellions in the northern part of the country. In addition, socio-political turmoil in Libya, armed conflict in Mali, the presence of Boko Haram and the presence of terrorist groups in the north-west have all led to displacement throughout Niger and an influx of migrants. All of these threats are aggravated by the illicit circulation of firearms. Putting in place the NAP is an opportunity to work on women’s marginalisation and other security issues tied to WPS.


By adopting the NAP, Niger reaffirms its commitment to improve the participation of women in prevention and resolution of conflicts and to take the necessary measures for the protection of women and girls before, during and after conflicts. The NAP focuses on four priority axes, including: Prevention of conflict and gender-based violence; Protection, Assistance and Rehabilitation of Victims; Participation and Representation; Coordination, monitoring and evaluation of activities. However, the NAP, while referencing the impact of armed conflict on women, does not offer any specific actions for disarmament and arms control, including monitoring mechanisms for assessing the impact of arms proliferation on sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). While the NAP offers financing specifics, refers to the role civil society has and will play, and gives specific information coordination, it does not have a timeline.

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National Action Plan: Niger

WILPF

WILPF has a group in Niger, but it was not not involved in the development process of Niger’s NAP.

Civil Society Actors

The NAP includes Civil Society throughout in an attempt to address the absence of women when creating, executing and evaluating durable solutions for peace. Niger repeats throughout the NAP that it is increasingly committed to involving women as important actors in any peace process and conflict management, and involved civil society in development, implementation and monitoring of the NAP.

  • NAP Development
    • Civil Society Actors were involved throughout the NAP development process. In 2011, development partners and civil society supported the High Authority for Peacebuilding in Niger in implementing programs to support victims of sexual and gender-based violence and armed conflict.
    • In 2015, the government updated a roadmap and a small working group was set up to propose a first logical framework for the action plan, the priority axis used in the current NAP.
    • In 2016, a workshop was organised, bringing together ministries involved in the field of 1325, civil society, NGOs, and technical and financial partners. The workshop analysed the relevance and consistency of the actions and activities proposed in the NAP logical framework and made a quantified proposal of the costs of these actions.
       
  • NAP Implementation
    • Civil Society is partly responsible for the implementation of all priority axes and their objectives, along with other government ministries.
    • For example, under Priority axis I: Prevention of conflict and gender-based violence, Objective 1 “Strengthen the institutional, legal and social environment for gender mainstreaming in conflict prevention and management”, Civil Society is partly responsible for Actions: “Create a directory of policies and laws that support women's involvement in peace and security issues including GBV during conflict”, “Monitor the implementation of regional instruments on women's rights, peace and security”, “Translate the NAP 1325 into national languages ​​and popularize it”, “Produce communication tools and sensitize/train the actors (elected, women, farmers / breeders, media, SDS, opinion leaders, religious and customary, CSOs), on 1325 including GBV and management techniques, conflicts, violent extremism and gender budgeting”, “Participate in advocacy with authorities and influential people”, “Commemorate International Women and Peace Day”
       
  • NAP Monitoring & Evaluation
    • Niger states in this NAP that it must involve all actors (state, technical and financial partners, NGOs and civil society organizations) involved in issues of peace and security. Each of these is tasked with a set of responsibilities.
    • The NAP calls for the creation of a "1325 Working Group" comprising of representatives from the key actors mentioned above. This group could serve as the Steering Committee for the Action Plan. It will therefore be a body of strategic orientation and be responsible for the planning of activities related to 1325.
    • Civil Society Organizations and Non-Governmental Organizations are tasked with:
      • Participating in the planning, formulation, implementation and monitoring and evaluation of activities
      • Mobilise and allocate additional resources for the implementation of selected activities
      • Advocate for the greater involvement of women in conflict issues, peacebuilding and security
      • Produce and disaggregate periodic reports of implementation of activities related to 1325

 

Government Actors
  • NAP Development
    • In 2008, Niger adopted a National Gender Policy (PNG) to promote women's human rights, equity and gender equality. Several meetings were organised in the following years to work on the NAP. The Ministry of Population, Women's Empowerment and Child Protection organized a workshop to set up a NAP in 2014. During this workshop, which identified the structures that should be part of the committee, the participants were sensitized on the 1325 resolution, and related resolutions and an action plan development roadmap were adopted. In 2015, the Ministry organised a day of exchanges on the same issue to take stock of the structures and actions that were carried out as part of the implementation of 1325.
    • The drafting of this NAP was coordinated by the Ministry of Population, Women's Empowerment and Child Protection (MPF / PE), with the help of the ECOWAS Conflict Prevention Framework,  the West African Network for Peacebuilding, the High Authority for the Consolidation of Peace (HACP) and civil society.
       
  • NAP Implementation
    • The framework for implementation of the NAP comprises of several parts. The NAP contains four “priority axes”, each of which contains several objectives, results, actions, indicators, targets and departments responsible for each. Some of these include: Ministry of the Interior, Public Security, Decentralization, Religious and Customary Affairs, Ministry of Justice,Ministry of Population, and the Ministry of National Defence among many others.
    • For example, under Priority Axis 2 “Protection, Assistance and Rehabilitation of Victims”, the objective “Women and girls know their rights and have increased access to the justice system” contains the actions “Raise awareness and train actors on the importance of justice and international humanitarian law in the fight against GBV” and “Organiser l’accompagnement juridique et judiciaire des victimes des VBG”. indicators include: Number of awareness actions and training carried out, number of women and men affected, Number of GBV victims helped, Number of legal actions, and Number of convictions of registered GBV perpetrators. The departments in charge of achieving all of this are Ministry of Women's Empowerment and Child Protection, the Ministry of Justice, High Authority for the Consolidation of Peace, National Commission of Human Rights, civil society and non-governmental organisations and the media.
    • The implementation of this action plan will be carried out with the financial assistance of the State of Niger and its development partners, each according to its area of ​​intervention. These include, but are not limited to, the following major donors: UNDP, UN-WOMEN, UNFPA, UNHCR, UNICEF, EUCAP-SAHEL, NDI, WANEP, CARE INTERNATIONAL, PLAN INTERNATIONAL NIGER, OXFAM, SAVE THE CHILDREN, ICRC, IOM, PEDEV II , USAID, CEA, LUXDEVELOPMENT, AFD.
       
  • NAP Monitoring and Evaluation
    • The Ministry of Women's Empowerment and Child Protection (MPF / PE) will ensure the effective implementation of the NAP as well as the sustainability of planned actions. Specifically, the role of the MPF / PE is to: 
      • Obtain the political commitments necessary to implement the planned interventions
      • Ensure the implementation and coordination of the activities selected
      • Ensure the integration of selected activities into existing programs
      • Mobilise resources and ensure transparent management
      • Assure and preside over the functioning of the Working Group 1325
    • Other ministerial and state structures involved in the field of 1325 are responsible for:
      • Contribute to the implementation of planned activities
      • Ensure the integration of the selected activities into their existing sectoral programs
      • Promote partnership and joint programming with other parties for better synergy of action
      • Elaborate periodic reports of implementation of activities
Objectives

By 2019, Niger’s commitments towards Women, Peace and Security are to be realised through the following four objectives:

  • Strengthen the institutional, legal and social environment for gender mainstreaming in conflict prevention and management
  • Protect women and girls from sexual violence and genital mutilation during conflict and provide medical care, socio-economic rehabilitation and the reintegration of survivors
  • Promote women's participation and representativeness in mediation, prevention and conflict management processes
  • Ensure the effective coordination of the National Action Plan for the implementation of United Nations Resolution 1325
Action/Activities

Each objective has different results/actions that serve to achieve these. For example, Objective 3 “Promote women's participation and representativeness in mediation, prevention and conflict management processes” includes the following:

  • Result 1: Texts and policies related to peace and security issues are listed and analyzed by gender.
    • Action 1a: Analyze using Gender Policies and Laws in the Field of Peace and Security
    • Action 1b: Create a directory of policies and laws that support women's involvement in peace and security issues including GBV during conflict
    • Action 1c: Monitor the implementation of regional instruments on women's rights, peace and security
Timeframe

The implementation period for the National Plan of Action of Niger is three years (2017-2019).

 

Budget

The total budget for this NAP is 5,908,000,000 West African CFA franc. The NAP explains and divides funding amongst the three years for each Axes and for each Action. For example, Priority Axis one will cost 744,000,000. The government and development partners will assist with finances.

 

Indicators

To achieve each objective, the NAP has different indicators assigned to each action. For example, in Priority Axis 4, (“Coordination, monitoring and evaluation of activities.”), Objective 1 (“Ensure effective coordination of the national action plan for the implementation of United Nations Resolution 1325”), Action 1 (“Establish and make operational a national committee for the coordination / steering and monitoring-evaluation of the NAP as well as committees in the 8 regions”) includes the following indicator: Number of committees dealing with coordination that are created and are functional.

Etc.

Monitoring & Evaluation

The NAP has a monitoring and evaluation section set up. The fourth Priority Axis looks are “Coordination, monitoring and evaluation of activities.” Actions include:

  • Establish and make operational a national committee for coordination / steering and monitoring-evaluation of the NAP as well as committees in the 8 regions
  • Organize quarterly coordination and monitoring meetings of the plan and produce periodic reports
  • Participate in meetings related to peace and security issues at the regional and international levels
  • Develop the annual operational plan
  • Organize an advocacy day for mobilizing partners around the 2017-2019 National Action Plan
  • Organize supervision and monitoring missions as part of the implementation of the NAP
  • Conduct a mid-term evaluation
  • Perform a final evaluation

There is also a separate chapter on coordination and monitoring of the NAP. The chapter states that the Ministry of Women's Empowerment and Child Protection will provide leadership in coordinating and monitoring / evaluating planned actions. Regional committees will be created in all regions of the country. Follow-up actions will be based on the indicators already defined in the framework of the NAP. Supervision and monitoring missions will be carried out to assess the level of achievement of planned activities. The chapter also defines the roles of each actor in monitoring the NAP.

Disarmament

The NAP, while referencing the impact of armed conflict on women, does not offer any specific actions for disarmament and arms control, including monitoring mechanisms for assessing the impact of arms proliferation on sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV).