Country / Region profile of: Costa Rica

Women in Costa Rica face discrimination in the economic realm. Female household workers are subject to exploitation and lack legal protections.  Costa Rica does not have a recent history of conflict and has officially abolished its military since 1948. Women enjoy the same legal status and rights as men under the law in most cases. The law prohibits discrimination against women and obligates the Government to promote political, economic, social and cultural equality. Currently Costa Rica is ranked at number 41 of the 144 countries listed in the Global Gender Gap Index (GGI) of 2017. Costa Rica ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) in 1986. Costa Rica voted for the adoption of the Arms Trade Treaty, signed on 3rd June 2013, and ratified on 25th September 2013. In October 2016, Costa Rica participated in the UNSC Open Debate and reaffirmed their support for the WPS agenda by highlighting how mainstreaming of a gender perspective within the UNSC should be a priority. Female policy makers and women from civil society organisations in Costa Rica work tirelessly to battle sexual and gender-based violence, which remains a major problem today.​ 

“Women have a higher unemployment rate in our country. When you analyze the composition of poverty, you will find that most of the families in poverty are being run by a woman. Also, a big issue is violence against women.” - Laura Chinchilla Miranda

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 0
Military expenditure
Costa Rica has no military.
Investing in peace and gender equality
Costa Rica could invest in creation and ongoing funding of a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
NAP 1325
Costa Rica does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Unknown