Country / Region profile of: Mongolia

There are no legal barriers to the participation of women or minorities in government and politics in Mongolia. The increase in female representation was helped by a December 2011 parliamentary election law, which includes a 20 percent quota for women candidates by political parties. Mongolia ranks 53 out of 144 countries in the 2017 Global Gender Gap Index (GGI) and has ratified the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) in 1981. Mongolia signed the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) in 2013 but did not ratify it. In 2017, $83 mln was spent by Mongolia on its military. Domestic violence remains a serious problem in Mongolia, and there are no laws against sexual harassment. Recognizing these issues, educated women have banded together to form NGOs to criminalize domestic abuse, to improve conditions for women in the labor force, to conduct research on employment, prostitution, and inequalities in wages for women. 

“We were dependent on men. [Now] we are more independent, we can say everything. We can have our own ideas and plans. Before, we were like satellites.” - Luvsan Erdenechimeg

YOU GET WHAT YOU PAY FOR!

$ 83,000,000
Military expenditure
The country spends USD$83,000,000 amount of money on the military, including armed forces and peacekeeping forces, defence ministries, paramilitary forces, and military space activities.
Investing in peace and gender equality
Mongolia could invest in creation and ongoing funding of a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
NAP 1325
Mongolia does not have a National Action Plan for the Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325.
WPS commitments
Unknown