United Nations Obligations on Women, Peace and Security

Implementation of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda is led by entities supporting women’s rights and gender equality at the United Nations, and involves specific programmatic obligations at a range of levels.

1325 Champions

The lead agency on the advancement of women at the UN is UN Women. UN Women was created after a global campaign by women-led civil society to develop a strengthened and integrated gender equality entity at the UN that brought together formerly weak and fragmented parts. On 2 July 2010 the General Assembly voted unanimously to create the UN Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women, bringing together four United Nations offices focusing on gender equality: the UN Development Fund for Women, the Division for the Advancement of Women, the Office of the Special Adviser on Gender Issues, and the UN International Research and Training Institute for the Advancement of Women. UN Women supports the Commission on the Status of Women and other intergovernmental bodies in formulating policies; helps Member States implement these standards; and holds the UN system accountable for its own commitments on gender equality.

Read more about UN Women>>

A key network on the advancement of women is the Inter-Agency Network on Women and Gender Equality (IANWGE). IANWGE is a network with representation from all UN member entities which works to ensure coordination and cooperation on the promotion of gender equality throughout the United Nations. This work includes supporting and monitoring the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome of the twenty-third United Nations General Assembly special session, "Women 2000: gender equality, development and peace for the twenty-first century".

Read more about IANWGE>>

The Friends of 1325 is an informal or ad hoc group of UN member states who formed to advocate for the implementation of Resolution 1325; it is organised by Canada. The group brings together like-minded states to discuss and coordinate positions on issues pertaining to women, peace and security and to keep pressure on the UN system to implement resolution 1325. The group also consults with relevant NGOs.

Read more about the Friends of 1325>>>

In 2016 after a decade of concerted calls by women led civil society, the Security Council created an Informal Expert Group (IEG) on Women, Peace and Security. This is the first official Security Council working group on Women, Peace and Security, and affirms the Council’s 2015 commitment in UNSCR 2242 (OP 5a) to strengthen more systematically the oversight and coordination of Women, Peace and Security implementation work. The 22242 IEG is co-chaired by the United Kingdom and Spain. In 2016, it has met on an approximately bi-monthly basis to discuss countries on the Council’s agenda including: Mali, Iraq, and the Central African Republic. 

Read more about creation of the IEG 2242>>

Spain, together with Canada, Chile, Japan, Namibia and the United Arab Emirates, officially launched the Women, Peace and Security Focal Points Network on 23 September 2016 in the recognition that national and regional efforts are vital for the full and effective implementation and coordination of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda. The WPS National Focal Points Network serves to enable a closer coordination among Member States and create a space to periodically share and exchange lessons learned and best practices, including on how to develop and review high-impact national strategies to advance these objectives and to integrate gender analysis in all security assessments and prevention approaches.

Read more about the WPS National Focal Points Network>>>

1325 System-Wide Obligations

Key milestones around the anniversaries of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and the Women Peace and Security Agenda have created opportunities to move from words to action.

One key framework for implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda throughout the United Nations System is the United Nations Strategic Results Framework on Women, Peace and Security. Another accountability mechanism is the annual Secretary-General report on Women Peace and Security, which highlights achievements, gaps, and challenges in moving the Agenda forward. Other mechanisms continue to be developed.

The Strategic Results framework was initiated around commemorations of the 10th anniversary of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 and the Women Peace and Security Agenda. As part of these commemorations, in 2010, the Security Council asked the United Nations Secretary General in Presidential Statement S/PRST/2010/22 to propose a strategic framework that would effectively monitor, coordinate and promote full the implementation of SCR 1325 for the next ten years. This framework now includes all four pillars of the Agenda:

  • Prevention - Prevention of all forms of violence against women and girls in conflict and post-conflict countries
  • Participation - Equal participation of women with men and promotion of gender equality in peace and security decision-making processes at national, regional and international levels
  • Protection - Protection and promotion of women's and girl's rights in conflict-affected situations
  • Relief and Recovery- Meeting of women and girls' specific relief needs and reinforcing of women's capacities to act as agents in relief and recovery in conflict and post-conflict situations

This framework was outlined to better coordinate the work of the UN entities, identify their responsibilities, and consequently support and enhance contributions made on global, national and regional levels to pushing implementation forward. It now provides a common vision for action which UN entities draw on in making concrete commitments to advance implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

 

TARGETS BY 2014
ThemeTarget by 2014Target by 2020 
Conflict prevention

50% of UN early warning systems utilise gender-specific indicators

UN development and other integrated planning frameworks and processes (ISF, UNDAF, IMPP) include activities aimed at strengthening the capacities of women’s CSOs working on conflict prevention in 20% of crisis countries with UN presence

40% of community-level conflict mediators trained by UN supported programmes are women

Inclusive and effective consultation with and involvement of women leaders and women’s groups to be included in 50% of UN supported disarmament activities

 

 

 

100% per cent of United Nations early warning systems utilise gender-specific indicators.

UN development and other integrated planning frameworks and processes (ISF, UNDAF, IMPP) include activities aimed at strengthening the capacities of women’s CSOs working on conflict prevention in 80% of crisis countries with UN presence

50% of community-level conflict mediators trained by UN supported programmes are women

Inclusive and effective consultation with and involvement of women leaders and women’s groups to be included in 75% of UN supported disarmament activities

 

 

 

Violence against women and girls in conflict

75% of Force Commander Directives and multi-dimensional Missions for Military and for police, incorporate human rights and SGBV prevention

15% increase in human rights field missions to remote areas

Women Protection Advisers (WPAs) are deployed to 50% of countries with a peacekeeping mission with a POC mandate where SVC is prevalent

Monitoring and Reporting Arrangements (MARA), as requested in SCR 1960 (2010), established and rolled out to selected countries.

SG makes concrete recommendations on addressing women’s and girls’ rights in 50% of countries and thematic issues on the SC agenda

100% of Force Commander Directives and multi-dimensional Missions for Military and for police, incorporate human rights and SGBV prevention

25% increase in human rights field missions to remote areas

Women Protection Advisers (WPAs) are deployed to 100% of countries with a peacekeeping mission with a POC mandate where SVC is prevalent

Monitoring and Reporting Arrangements in use in a selection of key countries 

SG makes concrete recommendations on addressing women’s and girls’ rights in 50% of countries and thematic issues on the SC agenda

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Women at all levels of institutions working on peace & security

Women comprise at least 30% of UN senior positions (P5 or higher) in conflict-affected countries

All countries with multi-dimensional PKM and SPM have at least one gender advisor

Women comprise at least 40% of UN senior positions (P5 or higher) in conflict-affected countries

 

Gender issues in peace agreements

 

At least one woman appointed as chief mediator/special envoy to UN-led peace processes

50% of all UN mediation support activities include gender expertise

50% of all UN special envoys and mediators and meditation teams undertake regular consultations with women leaders and women’s civil society organizations

 

 

 

 

At least one in each three new appointments of  chief mediator/special envoy to UN-led peace processes

75% of all UN mediation support activities include gender expertise

85% of all UN special envoys and mediators and meditation teams undertake regular consultations with women leaders and women’s civil society organizations

 

 

Women at all levels as decision-makers in post-conflict countries

At least 50% of electoral support programme units in requesting countries will include gender expertise

Technical assistance or strategy on support for achieving gender balance in public administration is available to 50% conflict-affected countries

All electoral support programme units in requesting countries will include gender expertise

Technical assistance or strategy on support for achieving gender balance in public administration is available to conflict-affected countries

Women and girls’ rights protection and promotion in conflict-affected situations

Operational guidance reflecting women’s and girls’ rights implemented in 50% of countries with integrated missions with POC mandates

Special measures to protect displaced women and girls operationalised in 50% of UN managed responses to displacement.

Operational guidance reflecting women’s and girls’ rights implemented in 100% of countries with integrated missions with POC mandates

Special measures to protect displaced women and girls operationalised in 75% of UN managed responses to displacement

Security Sector Reform and Disarmament

75% of UN-sponsored and -led disarmament and arms control programmes mainstream gender throughout programme design and delivery

20% of participants in security sector training activities are female

15% of UN SSR training and capacity-building is specifically for women participants

75% of UN SSR programmes include gender expertise and gender programming component

 

100% of UN-sponsored and -led disarmament and arms control programmes mainstream gender throughout programme design and delivery

30% of participants in security sector training activities are female

30% of UN SSR training and capacity-building is specifically for women participants

95% of UN SSR programmes include gender expertise and gender programming component

 

Justice

15% of funding of rule of law and access to justice programming is dedicated to gender equality and women’s empowerment

30% of funding of rule of law and access to justice programming is dedicated to gender equality and women’s empowerment

Relief and recovery initiatives in conflict and post conflict situations

GEP Funding tracking mechanisms (e.g. gender marker) established and operational in 40% of UN entities operating in conflict contexts. Of the rest, at least 50% incorporates GE issues

From the 2011 baseline, at least twice the number of projects in conflict and post-conflict situations amounting more than $10 million are staffed with gender officer /adviser or team.

Rosters for technical surge capacity for conflict and post-conflict situations include gender experts in each of the relevant areas (i.e. camp management, natural resources, etc.)

At least 50% of all UN-led local development and community infrastructure rehabilitation programmes include institutionalised mechanisms to ensure informed and effective participation of women’s groups at the community and local level (i.e. setting of priorities, identification of beneficiaries, monitoring implementation)

GEP Funding tracking mechanisms (e.g. gender marker) established and operational in 100% of UN entities operating in conflict contexts. 

100 per cent of United Nations-led planning documents and resulting projects and programmes in conflict and post-conflict situations respond to the distinct needs and capacities of girls, boys, women and men, especially vulnerable groups 

At least 50% of all UN-led local development and community infrastructure rehabilitation programmes include institutionalised mechanisms to ensure informed and effective participation of women’s groups at the community and local level (i.e. setting of priorities, identification of beneficiaries, monitoring implementation)

 

 

Post-conflict institutions and processes of peace consolidation

At least 15% of DDR programme funds are dedicated addressing specific gender needs, including the gendered dimensions of violence

Adequate and sufficient gender expertise available in 75% of UN-supported DDR programmes at management and implementation levels

At least 15% of funding on transitional justice programmes (including reparations projects) is specifically dedicated to gender equality.

At least 20% of DDR programme funds are dedicated addressing specific gender needs, including the gendered dimensions of violence

Adequate and sufficient gender expertise available in 95% of UN-supported DDR programmes at management and implementation levels

At least 15% of funding on transitional justice programmes (including reparations projects) is specifically dedicated to gender equality. Of the rest, at least 50 per cent incorporates gender equality issues 

Women and girls access to livelihood support services

At least 15% of funding on economic recovery programmes is specifically dedicated to gender equality

At least 30% of participants in economic recovery, temporary employment and post-conflict poverty reduction programs are women

At least 15% of funding on economic recovery programmes is specifically dedicated to gender equality,  with 50 per cent of the rest explicitly responding to different needs of men and women, girls and boys 

At least 30% of participants in economic recovery, temporary employment and post-conflict poverty reduction programs are women