Monthly Advocacy Points (MAP)

Each month, the NGO Working Group (NGOWG) on Women, Peace and Security releases Monthly Action Points (MAP) on Women, Peace and Security for the United Nations (UN) Security Council.

The analysis in these monthly briefs is designed for Security Council members and for the civil society organizations, Member States, and UN entities which are committed to addressing the rights and interests of women in conflict. The NGOWG ensures that the broad range of expertise of its membership and networks is available for additional analysis on key issue areas and country situations. By holding the Security Council accountable to its commitments on women, peace and security, this MAP project aims to:

  • Demonstrate how Women, Peace and Security matters can be addressed in the regular work of the Council and of Member States;
  • Provide impetus for Member States and UN entities to build robust systems of accountability;
  • Catalyze significant positive change in the lives of women in conflict by the 10th Anniversary of SCR 1325.

Below, you will find a year-by-year collection of the Monthly Action Points for your perusal. For Monthly Action Points in languages other than English and for more information on the activities of the NGOWG on Women, Peace and Security, please visit their website: www.womenpeacesecurity.org.

2017

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2017

    The NGO Working Group on Women Peace and Security's Monthly Action Points for February 2017 provides recommendations on the situations in the Central African Republic, Guinea-Bissau, Lebanon, Libya, South Sudan, and Syria.

    Download the full report below!

    _______________________________________________________________

    February 2017

    Central African Republic

    The situation in CAR continues to be serious, with persistent violence, insecurity, and political and religious tensions.

    Widespread displacement continues despite the transition of power in 2016, along with high rates of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) against women who lack necessary services and/or judicial recourse in many areas of the country. Further, there have been documented cases of perpetrators targeting women and girls suspected of interacting with people on the other side of the sectarian divide. It is imperative that human rights monitoring continues and individuals and entities participating in acts that undermine peace, stability and security in CAR are identified. In its consideration of the report on the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA), the Security Council should ensure there is detail regarding MINUSCA’s support for women’s participation in reconciliation efforts and ways in which the mission is engaging with civil society, including women’s civil society organizations. Additionally, the Security Council should request information on how implementation of the code of conduct on sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA) reflects the recommendations of the independent review of CAR as well as SCR 2272 (2016). Before deployment and training, peacekeepers must be vetted in accordance with the UN’s zero tolerance policy, and perpetrators of SEA must be brought to justice. Troop Contributing Countries should ensure permanent and reasonable rotation of field contingents and develop on site disciplinary sanctions to soldiers violating the code ofconduct.

     

    Guinea-Bissau

    The Security Council is expected to renew the mandate of the UN Integrated Peacebuilding Office in Guinea-Bissau (UNIOGBIS). The Council should ensure that UNIOGBIS, as a priority, addresses concerns surrounding Guinea-Bissau’s judicial system, which, if left unchecked, will allow impunity and corruption to grow. Increased attention on legal reform must coincide with efforts to ensure women’s participation and the protection of women’s rights. The Council should call for consultations with women and women’s civil society organizations (SCR 2122 (2013), OP 2(c)). Furthermore, women should be included as leaders and stakeholders in ongoing security sector reform, national reconciliation processes, institution building and addressing the root causes of instability. Finally, the Council must acknowledge the role drug trafficking has on undermining rule of law and stabilization reforms, take measures to address the differentiated impact drug trafficking has on women and acknowledge and encourage women’s role in addressing drug trafficking.

     

    Lebanon

    In its discussion of the strategic review of the UN mission in Lebanon (UNIFIL), the Council must ensure that gender issues are integrated throughout all conversations. Specific attention must be paid to women’s participation in all security-related matters, including disarming non-state armed groups, and gender-sensitive needs assessments to effectively coordinate humanitarian assistance. The Council should consider the extent to which the current mission mandate effectively responds to the particular concerns of civilians, including women and further ensure there is ongoing and regular consultation with diverse civil society organizations, including women’s groups (SCRs 2122 (2013) and 2242 (2015)), as UNIFIL’s relationship with local communities is essential to its success as a mission.

     

    Libya

    With the deteriorating security situation and the threat posed by armed groups and illicit arms proliferation, active female public figures, including human rights defenders (HRDs), civil society leaders, activists, journalists and politicians, continue to be targets of assassinations, abductions and sexual violence. Women are similarly subjected to violations by armed groups in their daily lives, such as harassment at security checkpoints and restriction of their freedom of mobility on the streets and in airports. The Security Council will be considering the most recent report on the implementation of the mandate for the UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL). The report and any briefings by senior UN leadership, should provide analysis of situation for women and the gendered impact of the conflict on the population, in addition to details regarding UNSMIL’s efforts to support women’s participation in conflict resolution and peace processes, engagement with women’s civil society organizations and efforts to protect women’s rights.

     

    South Sudan

    In consideration of the situation, including the ongoing political dialogue, the Council should reaffirm its commitment to women’s representation in official decision-making institutions and their meaningful participation in any peace process moving forward. The Security Council must apply all necessary pressure to ensure that South Sudanese women from national and grassroots organizations are included in the dialogue as well as in the implementation and monitoring of any outcomes. Given the severe security and humanitarian situation, the Council should also continue to protect civilians and call on the mission to hold regular consultations with local women’s civil society organizations to ensure protection strategies are responsive to women’s security concerns (SCR 2252 (2015), OP 8(a)(i), (v), (vi); (b)(i),(ii), (iii)). Specifically, the Council should:

    · Insist on the need for accountability for grave human rights violations and abuses, including sexual violence in IDP camps and local communities, particularly by ensuring that women are part of the design and implementation of early-warning and transitional justice mechanisms;

    · Call on UNMISS to ensure specific reporting mechanisms for SGBV are available and information is provided on how women can access such mechanisms, recognizing that the success of reporting and investigation instruments for SGBV depends on accessibility. Physical safe zones should also be staffed with female personnel, and survivors’ integrity should be respected, including not taking actions without consent;

    · Ensure that women and men can safely access humanitarian assistance, including safe access to sanitation facilities, hygiene and health assistance, reproductive health, family planning, and maternal health services;

    · Determine whether local civil society organizations, particularly women’s organizations, are consulted in the design and implementation of delivery mechanisms for humanitarian assistance; and

    · Ensure those embarking on voluntary and informed returns and relocations receive gender-sensitive integration assistance effectively tailored by incorporating women’s views into intention surveys and return and relocation decisions. Protection measures should specifically address women’s concerns, and comprehensive psycho-social assistance and livelihood support should be provided.

     

    Syria

    In its consideration of the report on the humanitarian situation, the Council should call for the meaningful participation of Syrian women; girls; civil society, including women’s organizations; and human rights defenders in the design and implementation of gender-sensitive humanitarian aid strategies both inside Syria and in neighboring countries (SCRs 2122 (2013) and 2242 (2015)).The Council should also ensure that women’s particular needs, such as secure access to sanitation facilities and hygiene and health assistance including reproductive health, family planning and maternal health services, are adequately addressed. Reporting should reflect the gender specific consequences of attacks against humanitarian convoys delivering medical supplies and against medical workers and facilities, which have increased in Syria since the adoption of SCR 2286 (2016).

    The Council must also ensure women’s participation in any UN-facilitated political process (SCR 2254 (2015)). Additionally, the Council should call on the Office of the Special Envoy for Syria to strengthen the role of the Syrian Women’s Advisory Board in the peace process. All mechanisms established to facilitate civil society participation, including engagement with diverse perspectives of civil society, should be fully resourced, supported, accessible and transparent. The Council should, further, urge all negotiating parties to have a minimum of 30 percent representation by women on their teams. Moreover, the Council must ensure that gender is mainstreamed as a cross cutting issue in the design and implementation of all transition and reconstruction processes, including ceasefire monitoring, security sector reform and disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes.

    The Council should inquire into any lack of reporting on concrete steps to be taken to ensure women’s full and meaningful inclusion in the peace process to ensure its effectiveness and sustainability, particularly in light of recent developments threatening its success. Reporting should also reflect local civil society, including women’s groups, efforts to ensure agreements are gender-sensitive and grounded in the experiences of local populations. Lastly, the Council should ensure women’s meaningful participation in the establishment and operation of the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism (UN General Assembly Resolution A/71/L.48 (2016)) to assist in the investigation of serious crimes committed in Syria since 2011, and that the mechanism adequately documents rights abuses against Syrian women and girls.

     

     

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2017

    For January, in which Sweden has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in the Central African Republic, Colombia, Iraq, and Somalia.

    _____________________________________

    Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2017

    SOURCE: NGO WORKING GROUP ON WOMEN, PEACE AND SECURITY

    ________________________________________

    Central African Republic

    In its consideration of the report on the UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA) the Security Council should:

    • Consider gender as a cross-cutting issue across all of MINUSCA’s work (SCR 2301 (2016), OP 45) and ensure the report highlights efforts to ensure women’s protection and support women’s participation (SCR 2301 (2016), OP 33 (a)(ii) and (b)(ii) and OP 34 (a)(i), (a)(ii)). This should include emphasis on ensuring a more gender-responsive MINUSCA Police Force, with a higher percentage of female personnel (SCR 2301 (2016), OP 34(b)(iv)).
    • Highlight MINUSCA efforts to consider and integrate the concerns of women, when developing and implementing its protection strategy through increased community engagement; recruiting additional Community Liaison Assistants (CLAs), with a particular emphasis on recruiting women and ensuring CLAs have a strong voice within the mission; and enhancing mechanisms to safely and confidentially report protection concerns and receive a timely response with effective accountability mechanisms.
    • Ensure that MINUSCA has the capacity to support women’s participation in reconciliation efforts. There should be a specific call for the mission to regularly engage with civil society organizations, including women’s organizations, and women cabinet members to ensure inclusion at all levels of political and security processes.
    • Emphasize the importance of upholding the code of conduct on sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA), reflecting the recommendations of the independent review of CAR as well as SCR 2272 (2016). Before deployment and training, peacekeepers must be vetted in accordance with the UN’s zero tolerance policy, and perpetrators of SEA must be brought to justice.

    Colombia

    As the Council discusses the situation in Colombia, the Council must ensure that the UN Mission in Colombia fulfills its coordination functions within the Monitoring and Verification Mechanism (MVM) with a gender perspective. Women’s rights must be a crosscutting issue in the implementation of the operation of the mission as well as in the tripartite MVM. Throughout the work of the mission including in the implementation and monitoring of the ceasefire, in the context of demobilization and with final peace agreement, there should also be ongoing and consistent consultation with national and local based women’s civil society organizations, including Afro-Colombian, indigenous and rural women’s organizations. The mandate should emphasize the importance of women’s empowerment and agency, as recent reporting has only made reference to SGBV and the previous mandate (SCR 2261 (2016)) did not include any element of the women, peace and security agenda. There should be an effort to support and strengthen all previous efforts by all parties to foster an inclusive peace process, and the mission should continue to work closely with gender experts to prevent sexual and gender-based violence during operations. The Council should consider the following:

    • The importance of ensuring that justice institutions are accessible and accountable to all survivors of violence in both rural and urban areas, including in the 20 Transitional Local Zones for Normalization (TLZN) and the 8 Transitional Local Points for Normalization (TLPN).
    • In consultation with women, indigenous and Afro-Colombian groups at national, regional, and local levels, the mission should establish readily accessible protection and reporting mechanisms to ensure there is transparency and accountability in the implementation of the ceasefire and final peace agreement, as well as opportunities to report instances of noncompliance, particularly in the context of demobilization.
    • In its support for disarmament, demobilization and reintegration, attention must be paid to tailoring assistance to the particular needs of female ex-combatants, as well as women and girls from communities where former fighters resettle.
    • In reconciliation and peacebuilding efforts, the needs and rights of women and girls must be at the forefront of the design and implementation of early-warning and ceasefire monitoring mechanisms (SCR 2261 (2016), OP 3).
    • The MVM should also monitor, investigate and report on the human rights situation, and consistently consult with women’s civil society organizations in the assessment of incidents and issuing of recommendations to avoid recurrence of incidents.
    • The mission should provide technical assistance to the government for the effective implementation and maintenance of protection measures, particularly the National Commission on Security Guarantees for women human rights defenders, and expand emergency relocation funds to include family members and dependents of those at risk of violence.
    • Ensure the full and meaningful participation of women’s civil society organizations, including Afro-Colombian, indigenous and rural women’s organizations in the forthcoming peace negotiations with the National Liberation Army (ELN).

    Iraq

    The conflict between the ISIL/Da’esh and Government forces, with assistance from allied militias, continues to dominate discussions on the human rights situation in Iraq. In its consideration of a report on the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI), the Security Council must urge accountability for serious human rights violations by all sides, including SGBV, sexual slavery, abduction and human trafficking by ISIL and reports of beatings and unlawful detention by Government forces and allied militias during military offensives. The Council should thus ensure that UNAMI is regularly engaging with women’s organizations and taking concrete steps to support women’s participation in all peace and security processes. The Council should consider the following recommendations:

    • Apply a gender lens to humanitarian planning and assistance efforts throughout the country as relates to women, men, girls and boys, including the humanitarian response to the ongoing Mosul offensive.
    • Urge the Government of Iraq to clarify the shelter policy and allow Iraqi NGOs to operate shelters and provide much needed services to survivors of SGBV as well as fully fund and implement in consultation with women’s organizations Iraq’s National Action Plan (NAP) on SCR 1325 (2000).
    • Urge the Government of Iraq to legally allow displaced women and girls to obtain Civil Status Identification documents without requiring verification of their identity by a male relative.
    • Call on the Committee for Women, Family, and Child of the Iraqi government to incorporate the civil society proposed amendments to the draft Family Protection Law, and compel the Council of Representatives to adopt the bill.
    • Urge the Government of Iraq to ratify the Rome Statute for the International Criminal Court and recognize that the fight against impunity for the most serious crimes committed against women and girls have been strengthened through the work of the International Criminal Court, ad hoc, and mixed tribunals (SCR 2242 (2015), OP 14).
    • Urge the Government of Iraq to ensure that investigations and prosecutions of all human rights abuses, including those perpetrated by national and their allied forces in military efforts to combat ISIL / Da’esh, are conducted in accordance with international standards.
    • Expand the scope of current documentation efforts to include other gender-based crimes including crimes against women as human rights defenders, LGBT persons and others who defy their gender ascribed roles.

    Somalia

    As the Council continues to consider the situation in Somalia and discusses the latest Secretary General’s reports on the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM) and the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), the Council should promote women’s full participation in all efforts to maintain peace and security in Somalia, as well as inquire into efforts by the Federal Government of Somalia and Interim Regional Administrations, with assistance from UNSOM and AMISOM, to continue to promote increased representation of women at all decision-making levels in Somali institutions. The Council should also ensure there is progress made in implementing UNSOM’s mandate (SCR 2158 (2014), OP 1 (d)(i), (d)(iii) and (d)(iv) and OP 1 (e)(iii)) to help prevent, monitor, investigate and report on abuses and violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, including through the full deployment of Gender Advisers. The report should also include efforts by AMISOM and troop contributing countries, as specified in SCR 2275 (2016). Further, the Council should also request information on Somali authorities and AMISOM efforts to ensure women, girls, boys and other non-combatant males are protected and provide safe passage to civilians, during military offensives to recapture towns under Al-Shabaab control. As a recent Secretary-General report has evidenced ISIL / Da’esh increasing influence in Somalia (S/2016/830), the Council should request information and analysis on the differential impact on the human rights of women and girls of terrorism and violent extremism in Somalia, as well as efforts by the missions to ensure the participation and leadership of women and women’s organizations in developing strategies to counter terrorism and violent extremism (SCR 2242 (2015), PP 14, OP 13).

     

2016

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2016

    In December 2016, under the Presidency of Spain in the Security Council, the NGO Working Group on Women Peace and Security's MAP provides recommendations on  Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Mali, West Africa and the Sahel, and Yemen, as well as the issue of countering conflict-related trafficking.

    Download the full report below or find the original here. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2016

    For November, in which Senegal has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Central Africa, Israel / Palestine, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria.

    Download the full report below or find the original here. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2016

    Russia will take the presidency of the Security Council in October. The newly released MAP focuses include the annual Women, Peace and Security Open Debate, the Colombian Peace Process, the renewal of the mandate for the UN Stabilisation Mission in Haiti, and Consider a Report on the UN Assistance Mission for Iraq.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: September 2016

    For September, in which New Zealand has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, and Mali, as well as migrant.

    Download the full document below or access it here

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2016

    For August, in which Malaysia has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Lebanon, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2016

    For July, in which Japan has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in the Central African Republic, Cyprus, Iraq, Somalia, Syria and West Africa.

  • MONTHLY ACTION POINTS (MAP) FOR THE SECURITY COUNCIL: JUNE 2016

    For June, in which France has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, and Sudan (Darfur). The MAP also provides recommendations on protection of civilians and women, peace and security. 

  • MONTHLY ACTION POINTS (MAP) FOR THE SECURITY COUNCIL: APRIL 2016

    For April, in which China has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Central African Republic, Colombia, South Sudan, Syria, Western Sahara, and Yemen.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAPs) for the Security Council: March 2016

    For March, in which Angola has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Mali, Somalia, and Conflict Prevention in Africa. 

  • MONTHLY ACTION POINTS (MAP) FOR THE SECURITY COUNCIL: FEBRUARY 2016

    For February, in which Venezuela has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Central African Republic, Colombia, GuineaBissau, Liberia, South Sudan, and Syria.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2016

    For January, in which Uruguay has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Cyprus, Iraq, Kosovo, Libya, and Syria.

2015

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2015
  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2015

    For November 2015, in which the United Kingdom has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, the Central African Republic, Lebanon, Somalia, South Sudan, and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on conflict prevention.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2015

    For October 2015, in which Spain has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Haiti, Iraq, South Sudan, and Syria, as well as Women, Peace and Security, in the context of the 15th Anniversary of SCR 1325 (2000).

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) on Women, Peace and Security, NGOWG, September 2015

    For September, in which Russia has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Libya and Mali. In its regular work across all agenda items, the Security Council should ensure that all country reports and mandate renewals evaluate the level of protection and promotion of women’s human rights, as per SCRs 1325, 1820 (OP 9), 1888 (OP 11), 1889 (OP 5), 1960 (OPs 6, 13), 2106 (OPs 5, 6), and 2122 (OP 2(d)). Member States should inquire about any lack of such reporting.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2015

    The MAP is a two page briefing note that provides analysis and advocacy entry points on country situations and thematic issues on the Security Council's agenda for the forthcoming month. These briefs are designed for Security Council Members, civil society actors, Member States, and UN entities, and are for wide distribution. We look forward to your feedback and input.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2015

    For July, in which New Zealand has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Cyprus, Iraq, Sudan (Abyei), and Syria as well as the thematic discussion on security challenges in Small Islands and Developing States (SIDS). In its regular work across all agenda items, the Security Council should ensure that all country reports and mandate renewals evaluate the level of protection and promotion of women’s human rights, as per SCRs 1325, 1820 (OP 9), 1888 (OP 11), 1889 (OP 5), 1960 (OPs 6, 13), 2106 (OPs 5, 6), and 2122 (OP 2(d)). Member States should inquire about any lack of such reporting.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: June 2015

    For June, in which Malaysia has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Cote d’Ivoire, Darfur, Mali, and Nigeria, as well as the thematic discussion on children and armed conflict.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2015

    For May, in which Lithuania has the presidency of the UN Security Council, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Libya, Somalia, South Sudan, and Syria, as well as the thematic discussion on small arms and light weapons.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: April 2015 MAP

    For April, in which Jordan has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations regarding the Middle East situation, specifically the Palestinian Territories, Syria, Central African Republic, Iraq, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommended Security Council action points on Women, Peace and Security, as the Council discussed the Secretary-General's 2014 report on Sexual Violence in Conflict in an Open Debate. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: March 2015

    For March, in which France has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, DRC, Libya, South Sudan, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on the regular implementation of women, peace and security in the work on the Security Council as well as for the Council's field mission to Burundi and CAR.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2015 MAP

    For February, in which China has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Abyei, Darfur, Guinea-Bissau, Somalia, and South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on the regular implementation of women, peace and security in the work on the Security Council.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2015 MAP

    For January, in which Chile has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, Somalia, and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations for discussions on protection of civilians in armed conflict, and on the regular implementation of women, peace and security in the work on the Security Council.

2014

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2014

    For December, in which Chad has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, DRC, Iraq, Liberia, Libya and Mali. The MAP also provides recommendations for discussions on countering terrorism and transnational organized crime, peacekeeping, and on the regular implementation of women, peace and security in the work on the Security Council.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2014

    For November, in which Australia has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Darfur, Guinea-Bissau, Iraq, South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for the open debate on counterterrorism, and on the regular implementation of women, peace and security in the work on the Security Council.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2014

    For October, in which Argentina has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Haiti, Iraq, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on women, peace and securityin advance of the open debate that will be held to mark the 14th anniversary of the adoption of Security Council resolution 1325 (2000).

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: September 2014

    For September, in which the United States has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, the Middle East, South Sudan, and Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on counterterrorism, and the ongoing implementation of the women, peace and security agenda.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2014

    For August, in which the United Kingdom has the presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, the Central African Republic, Darfur, Haiti, Liberia, the Middle East, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on the forthcoming Security Council field mission to South Sudan and Somalia, the open debate on conflict prevention, and the ongoing implementation of thewomen, peace and security agenda.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2014

    For July, in which Rwanda has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in the Central African Republic, Iraq, South Sudan, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on the ongoing implementation of the women, peace and security agenda.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: June 2014

    For June, in which the Russian Federation has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, the Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Mali, South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on the ongoing implementation of the women, peace and security agenda. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2014

    For May, in which the Republic of Korea has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Cote d’Ivoire, Guinea-Bissau, Sudan - Abyei, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on the ongoing implementation of the women, peace and securityagenda.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: April 2014

    For April, in which Nigeria has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Central African Republic, Mali, Sudan / South Sudan, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommendations for the forthcoming open debate on women, peace and security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: March 2014

    For March, in which Luxembourg has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, DRC, Libya, Sierra Leone, and Somalia. The MAP also provides recommendations for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security obligations.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2014

    For February, in which Lithuania has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in the Central African Region, Darfur, Iraq, the Middle East, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security obligations. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2014

    For January, in which Jordan has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Cote d'Ivoire, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security.

2013

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2013

    For December, in which France has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo, Golan Heights, Somalia, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2013

    For November, in which China has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic / Central African Region, Iraq, Somalia, Sudan / South Sudan, and Syria.The MAP also provides recommendations on the forthcoming discussion on counter-terrorism. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2013

    For October, in which Azerbaijan has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Haiti, Mali, and Somalia. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected open debate on women, peace and security, and the forthcoming Security Council mission to Africa.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: September 2013

    For September, in which Australia has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected high-level debate on small arms and light weapons, and guidance for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security obligations. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2013

    For August, in which Argentina has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Central African Republic, Haiti, Lebanon, Liberia, the situation in the Middle East and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected open debate on protection of civilians, and guidance for ongoing implementation of women, peace and security obligations. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2013

    For July, in which the United States has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Cote d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Lebanon, the Middle East and South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on women, peace and security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: June 2013

    For June, in which the United Kingdom has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Somalia, and Sudan/South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected open debate on women, peace and security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2013

    For May, in which Togo has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, the Central African region, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected discussions on Counterterrorism, and for the Council's ongoing work on women, peace and security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: April 2013

    For April, in which Rwanda has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Darfur / Sudan, Guinea-Bissau, Kosovo, Mali, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected discussions on Conflict Prevention in Africa and on Sexual Violence in Conflict under the agenda item Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: March 2013

    For March, in which the Russian Federation has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea-Bissau, Mali, Sierra Leone, Somalia, and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2013

    For February, in which the Republic of Korea has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Guinea-Bissau, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Liberia, Mali, Syria, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on Women, Peace and Security, and on the expected debate on the Protection of Civilians.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2013

    For January, in which Pakistan has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Central African Republic, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Mali, Somalia, Sudan/Darfur, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on Women, Peace and Security, on the expected debates on Counterterrorism and Peacekeeping, and discussions on Rule of Law.

2012

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2012

    For December, in which Morocco has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Central African Region, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Golan Heights, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Somalia, Syria, and Timor-Leste. The MAP also provides recommendations on Women, Peace and Security and the expected open debate on peacebuilding.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2012

    For November, in which India has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia and Herzegovina, Central African Region, Democratic Republic of Congo, Iraq, Libya, Mali, the Middle East, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan / South Sudan, Timor-Leste, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected debates on Women, Peace and Security, on piracy, and on counterterrorism.

    No file attached
  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2012

    For October, in which Guatemala has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, DRC, Darfur, Haiti, Lebanon, Somalia, Sudan / South Sudan, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommendations on the Rule of Law and Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: September 2012

    For September, in which Germany has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan / South Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2012

    For August, in which the France has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Central African Region, Haiti, Lebanon, Middle East, and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2012

    For July, in which Colombia has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Cote d'Ivoire, Iraq, South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: June 2012

    For June, in which the China has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, DRC, Libya, Syria, and West Africa. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected discussion on Protection of Civilians.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2012

    For May, in which Azerbaijan has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in DRC, Libya, Mali, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected Security Council Mission to West Africa.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: April 2012

    For April, in which the United States has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Liberia, Myanmar, South Sudan, Syria, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected briefing to the Council on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: March 2012

    For March, in which the United Kingdom has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Afghanistan, Haiti, Libya, Sierra Leone, Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security, and the expected Open Debate on the Situation in the Middle East.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2012

    For February, in which Togo has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Haiti, Somalia, Syria, and Timor-Leste. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2012

    For January, in which South Africa has the Security Council presidency, the January MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Somalia, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security.

2011

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: December 2011

    For December, in which the Russian Federation has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cyprus, Central African Republic, Cote d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Golan Heights, Lebanon, Libya, Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia, and West Africa.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: November 2011

    For November, in which Portugal has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Bosnia-Herzegovina, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Myanmar, and Somalia. The November MAP also discusses key issues for the Council to consider in its discussion of Protection of Civilians.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: October 2011

    For October, in which Nigeria has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Afghanistan, Darfur, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Haiti, Israel / Palestine, Kosovo, Libya, Sudan, Syria, and Timor-Leste. The October MAP also provides recommendations regarding the Council's expected discussion on the implementation of its Women, Peace and Security commitments in the context of the 11th anniversary of the adoption of SCR 1325 (2000).

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: September 2011

    For September, in which Germany has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, Libya, Mali, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sudan / South Sudan, Syria and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations. 

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: August 2011

    For August, in which the France has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Bosnia & Herzegovina, Central African Region, Haiti,Lebanon, Middle East, and Sudan / South Sudan. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: July 2011

    For July, in which Colombia has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Burundi, Cote d'Ivoire, Iraq, South Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations for the Security Council's ongoing implementation of its Women, Peace and Security obligations.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: June 2011

    For June, in which the China has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Afghanistan, DRC, Libya, Syria, and West Africa. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected discussion on Protection of Civilians.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: May 2011

    For May, in which Azerbaijan has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in DRC, Libya, Mali, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected Security Council Mission to West Africa.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: April 2011

    For April, in which the United States has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on the situations in Liberia,Myanmar, South Sudan, Syria, and Western Sahara. The MAP also provides recommendations on the expected briefing to the Council on Women, Peace and Security.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: March 2011

    For March, in which the United Kingdom has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Afghanistan, Haiti, Libya, Sierra Leone, Sudan, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security, and the expected Open Debate on the Situation in the Middle East.

  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: February 2011

    For February, in which Togo has the Security Council presidency, the MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Haiti, Somalia, Syria, and Timor-Leste. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security.

    No file attached
  • Monthly Action Points (MAP) for the Security Council: January 2011

    For January, in which South Africa has the Security Council presidency, the January MAP provides recommendations on country situations including: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Somalia, and Syria. The MAP also provides recommendations regarding the expected Council discussions on Women, Peace and Security.