WILPF Initiatives and Events

As part of the global feminist peace movement, WILPF organises events with advocates from local to global levels to create space for creative thinkers to challenge the status-quo. In 2016, this has included: a symposium at the 60th Commission on the Status of Women; a summer workshop on financing for Women, Peace and Security; a delegation for the 16th Anniversary of UNSCR 1325; as well as numerous other events and initiatives.

We amplify the voices of women peace makers and connect the dots between Women, Peace and Security, disarmament, and human rights. 

Use our calendar and see below past and future events and use our calendar.

Stay tuned for upcoming events by signing up to receive our monthly newsletter!

2017

  • Job Posting:WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Associate

    Job Posting: WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Associate

    DESCRIPTION

    Do you have experience with managing a project from research phase over development to final implementation of the product? Do you have an excellent and up-to-date knowledge of communications techniques and a proven track record in production of websites, newsletters and printed materials? Do you have experience in political communications, media relations and storytelling? Then you could be the Programme Associate that we are looking for. 

     

    The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) works for feminist peace through disarmament and women's rights. As a member of WILPF’s dedicated Women, Peace and Security programme, PeaceWomen, you will be the focal point for our comprehensive and well known website on women, disarmament, and human security. You will be in charge of overseeing the implementation of our messaging as well as our monitoring and outreach. Moreover, in 2017 we are focusing our work to do more in depth advocacy. For this, we need an experienced person, who can be in charge of implementing these projects from the initial research to final hands-on implementation.

     

    Job Purpose

    The Programme Associate should be a highly motivated and politically driven individual. This role has responsibility to support the role of the Programme Director and to implement designated Women, Peace and Security (WPS) projects, over all programme communications, on WPS monitoring, and to act as a focal point for PeaceWomen website with support from a team of fellows/interns. As such, it is essential that you have demonstrated skills in managing volunteers or staff and liaising with global collaborators. Priority consideration will be given to applicants with campaign experience or expertise in communicating issues of gender, security, or global politics.

     

    Main responsibilities

    1.    WILPF WPS work:

    Advance WILPF work on WPS including:

    •      Attend, monitor, and report on multilateral meetings on WPS issues. This involves working with team and partners to ensure project completion around monitoring of the Security Council, Member States, and United Nations

    •      Research and publish annual Security Council Scorecard and support development of briefing materials on Feminist Security Council Agenda for peace

    •      Support the director in relationships with key NGO partners, UN entities and Member State representatives to the UN.

    •      Support WILPF’s engagement in events, such as the Commission on the Status of Women. 

    •      Support event organisation and logistical arrangements for meetings on WPS work.

    •      Identify opportunities for projects to advance WILPF’s visibility, goals, and policies.

     

    2.    Communications

    •      Maintain the PeaceWomen website and social media in consultation with the director and the communications manager

    •      Manage outreach and communications, and act as PeaceWomen liaison on outreach.

    •      Assist and/or coordinate in the creation of all publications and newsletters

    •      Support website and monitoring work

    •      Act as main liaison with technical team and provide technical support for programme

    •      Assist with research, writing, and editing PeaceWomen newsletters, publications, fact sheets, and other outreach material

     

    3.    Project Management:

    Oversee the development and implementation of specific projects in coordination with the programme director.

     

    4.    Operations:

    Assist operations of the programme including assisting fundraising through the contributing to drafting or updating proposals and reporting to funders. Supporting the programme in the monitoring of on-going work to ensure accuracy of activities vis-à-vis contractual and grant commitments.

     

    Lead on recruiting, coordination, supervision, and management of WPS fellows/interns and identify ways to improve internship programme.

     

    Respond to general requests to the PeaceWomen by email, mail and telephone, or delegating to, and supervising the carrying out of this responsibility by, others.

     

    Assist in general maintenance of the PeaceWomen programme through performance of ad hoc tasks and responsibilities as mutually agreed with the relevant supervisor

     

    5.    WILPF Community:

    Collaborate with WILPF Community to identify and create opportunities that support their work and advocacy on gender, disarmament, and peace including:

    ·      Liaise with other WILPF teams to coordinate work.

    ·      Coordinate and engage with WILPF’s sections related to work on WPS

     

    6.    Other:

    Carry out other duties as required.

     

    Accountabilities

    ·      WPS monitoring work at the UN Headquarters

    ·      Updating and maintenance of the website

    ·      Recruitment of fellows/interns

     

    Interdependences and Reporting

    PA works closely with Programme Director, Communications manager and programme interns.

    PA reports to the PD

     

    Measures of success

    ·      Quality of the WPS monitoring work

    ·      Timely completion of the project and publication work

    ·      Status of the website

    ·      Management of fellows/interns

     

    Knowledge, Skills and Experience:

    ·      Demonstrated commitment to WILPF’s values including feminist peace and gender equality is required.

    ·      Expertise on WPS.

    ·      Exceptional ability to motivate, mentor, and coordinate volunteers / trainees, and orchestrate effective communication among staff, interns / fellows, technical team, international staff, diplomatic and INGO partners, and global peace advocates.

    ·      Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. 

    ·      Excellent planning, co-ordination and prioritisation skills, capable of rapid and quality turn around on a high workload

    ·      Self-motivated, able to work independently, willing to learn, open minded, flexible

    ·      Exemplary verbal and written communication skills in English with high attention to detail, copy editing and media brief writing.

    ·      Other UN languages (especially Arabic or French) a plus

    ·      Skills in CMS platforms, traditional and social media (press releases, blogs, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), and electronic newsletters (e.g., MailChimp).

     

    Education and Experience:  

    The position requires:

    A degree in gender, human rights, international relations, journalism, law, social science or a related field.

    A minimum of 2 years of WPS work experience in a fast paced International non-profit organisation

    HOW TO APPLY

    uno.wilpf@gmail.com

    http://peacewomen.org/about-us

    To be considered for the WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Associate position, applicants should submit the following documents to: uno.wilpf@gmail.com.

    Deadline for submission is Monday 1 May 2017. The subject of the e-mail should be “WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Associate Application” and all documents should be combined into one PDF or DOCX file.

    1. CV or Resume indicating education, relevant past activities and experience
    2. Cover Letter (1 page, single-spaced), confirming available start date
    3. 3 References, including names and contact information

     

    No phone calls please. Please e-mail uno.wilpf@gmail.com with any questions. Thank you!




2016

  • Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation
    Thursday, October 27, 2016 -
    13:15 to 14:30

    UNHQ New York

    Event Title: "Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation"
    Date: 27 October 2016
    Time: 1:15pm - 2:30pm 
    Location: UN Secretariat (Conference Room: 2)
    Partners: WILPF, UN Women, The Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), the Permanent Missions of Australia, Ireland, Spain, and the United Kingdom to the United Nations

     

    Panelists at the  “Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation” event. (Photo: WILPF/Anna Warrington)

    SPEAKERS:

    Anne-Marie Goetz (Moderator), Clinical Professor, the Center for Global Affairs, New York University

    Tim Mawe, Deputy Permanent Representative, Mission of Ireland to the United Nations (UN)

    Abigail Ruane, Programme Director, WILPF PeaceWomen

    Mavic Cabrera-Balleza, International Coordinator, Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP)

    Nahla Valji, Deputy Chief, UN Women Peace and Security Section

    Jelena Zelenovic, Programme Officer, UN Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO)

    Elizabeth Cafferty, Gender and Humanitarian Policy Specialist, UN Women’s Humanitarian Unit

    On 27 October 2016, WILPF, the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), UN Women, and the Missions to the United Nations of Australia, Ireland, Spain, and the United Kingdom co-hosted an event on financing the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda. The event aimed to mobilise member states to strengthen financial commitment and action to move from commitments to accomplishments. Moderated by former UN Women Head of Peace and Security and current NYU Professor Anne-Marie Goetz, the panel of six experts exchanged and addressed lessons, good practices and pressing concerns to move the Agenda forward.

    Deputy Permanent Representative Tim Mawe of Ireland began the conversation by reminding the audience of the importance of strengthening women’s participation, protection, and rights in conflict prevention through post-conflict reconstruction processes. “Women need to be sitting at the table, not behind,” he stated. Despite the urgent need, the WPS Agenda remains chronically underfunded. Mawe called for governments and civil society to take action to strengthen WPS financing as a matter of priority, including by strengthening conflict prevention and disarmament and contributing to the innovative Global Acceleration Instrument.

    WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Director Abigail Ruane continued the conversation by challenging the scarcity mentality on financing gender equality and peace and sharing about WILPF’s #MoveTheMoney toolkit to strengthen mobilisation for WPS financing and accountability. “It is not that we don’t have the money for peace and gender justice. We just spend the money we do have badly,” she stated. According to the Global Study, only two per cent of aid on peace and security targets gender equality. In fact, the budget of the entire global feminist movement ($106 million for 740 women’s organisations according to a 2013 AWID survey), is approximately equivalent to one, F-35 fighter jet (approximately $137 million). We cannot continue this failed approach. According to Ruane, “the time is now to #MoveTheMoney from war to peace and gender justice.”

    GNWP International Coordinator Mavic Cabrera-Balleza shared innovative action on financing UNSCR 1325 National Action Plans (NAPs) to strengthen implementation and accountability. According Cabrera-Balleza, of the 63 NAPs around the world, only 12 have a dedicated budget for implementation. This is a serious challenge, because peace requires not only time and effort, but also proper allocation of resources. NAP financing workshops, such as conducted by GNWP, provide one important mechanism for strengthening financing of the WPS Agenda. “Peace is not a project,” stated Cabrera-Balleza. “It is not something that one country can work on alone, and it is not something that people or organisations can get done immediately.”

    UN Women Deputy Chief of Peace and Security Nahla Valji spoke about the importance of investing in civil society for conflict prevention efforts. Research now shows that peace agreements last longer with women and civil society, and that feminist movements are the number one predictor of policies on reducing violence against women. However, although UNSC Resolution 2122 (2015) calls for greater funding for civil society organisations, governments continue to invest almost no resources in civil society. In 2015, only 23 governments made financial commitments on WPS. “We must invest in prevention in order to stop the expensive cost of conflict resolution,” she stated. Valji called for states to support the Global Acceleration Instrument as one key way of supporting women led civil society.  

    PBSO Programme Officer Jelena Zelenovic shared about PBSO’s recent Gender Promotion Initiative which was for the first time opened to civil society in 2016 as another example of strengthening financing for civil society and strengthened WPS accountability. Zelenovic reiterated the theme that “women’s empowerment and promotion are key to achieving peace.” However, she noted that there is a disconnect between what is happening on the ground from what the United Nations is willing to support. Investing in funds that invest in women led civil society such as PBSO’s gender promotion initiative should be a key priority for action.

    UN Women Gender and Humanitarian Policy Specialist Elizabeth Cafferty shared about the WPS commitments made at the May 2016 World Humanitarian Summit and how the Grand Bargain launched can make both WPS and humanitarian action more efficient and effective. At the Summit, approximately 18 per cent (545 of over 3,000) commitments were on women and gender, including on: gender-disaggregated data, integration of gender markers, investment in the Global Acceleration Instrument, and ending of humanitarian funding for gender-blind programs by 2018. The Grand Bargain, launched at the World Humanitarian Summit, aims to direct humanitarian funding towards local communities by reducing restrictions, providing more predictable and continuous humanitarian response, and realising 30 per cent of humanitarian funding is un-earmarked or softly earmarked by 2020. Cafferty concluded by saying that “when you invest in women, you get greater returns.”

    At the 16th anniversary of UNSCR 1325, the time is now to move the money and invest in holistic WPS Agenda that strengthen conflict prevention and gender equality for sustainable peace. There are many different good practice opportunities for taking action. Now is time to step up.




  • "Masculinities, Youth and Violence in Crisis Settings" - Consultation: WILPF, UNDP, MenEngage, ICAN

    Event Title: "Masculinities, Youth and Violence in Crisis Settings"
    Location: New York, NY

    Speakers, Discussants, and Remarks:

    • Randi Davis, Director of Gender Team, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP
    • Sarah Poole, Deputy Assistant Administrator and Deputy Director, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP
    • Joni van De Sand, MenEngage
    • Sanam Naraghi Anderlini, International Civil Society Action Network (ICAN)
    • Diego Antoni, Policy Specialist, Gender Team, Bureau for Policy and Programme Support, UNDP
    • Maria Butler, Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)
    • Raziq Fahim, Executive Director, College of Youth Activism and Development, Pakistan
    • Besnik Leka, Young Men's Initiative Coordinator, Care International, Balkans
    • Joy Onyesoh, President, WILPF-Nigeria
    • Esperanza Gonzales, UNDP Colombia
    • Carlos Ivan Garcia, Coordinator, Colombian Institute of Family Welfare
    • Alan Grieg, UNDP Consultant/Masculinities Expert


    Context:

    A two-day consultation on ‘Masculinities and Violence in Crisis Settings’ was held on 26-27 October, 2016, organised by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, the International Civil Society Action Network and the MenEngage Alliance. The consultation brought together a number experts in the field of gender and peace and security in order to develop a better collective understanding of masculinities and its relationship with violence in crisis settings.

    The objectives of the consultation were first, to present UNDP’s revised conceptual framework on masculinities and violence in crisis and fragile settings and second, to identify practical entry points for integrating key aspects of gender and masculinities in UNDP programming in crisis and post-crisis settings. 

    Two key conclusions from the consultation were first, to prevent violence, it is necessary to engage not only with the small group of young men who perpetrate violence but with communities as a whole, as this is where social norms are shaped. Second, men and masculinities should not be seen as a separate strategy, but rather should be an essential element in a complete gender analysis of any situation.

    Closed workshop. 




  • Connecting Grassroots and International Efforts for Action on Women, Peace and Security: Leveraging our Local to Global Movements
    Monday, October 24, 2016 -
    16:00 to 17:30

    10th floor, Room 10-H, Church Center, 777 UN Plaza, NYC

     

    WILPF International and a special delegation of women peace leaders from Syria, Yemen, and Libya at the 16th Anniversary of UNSCR1325. (Photo: WILPF/Marina Kumskova)

     

    Event Information

    • Monday, October 24th, 2016, 4:00pm – 5:30pm

    • WILPF New York office, 777 UN Plaza, New York, 10th Floor

     

    Organised by

    • Women’s International League Peace and Freedom (WILPF)

     

    List of speakers

    • Waad Hamida, co-founder of Students Peace Movement, Tripoli University and member of Together We Build It (Libya)

    • Rasha Jarhum, Social Protection Specialist, WPS, Yemen Expert, Aspen New Voices Fellow (Yemen)

    • Sema Nassar, Board Member of Urnammu ‘Justice & Human Rights’ Foundation (Syria)

    • Laila Alodaat, Crisis Response Programme Manager, WILPF (Moderator)

     

    On 24 October 2016 at 4:00pm, WILPF held a public event centred around connecting grassroots movements with international efforts for action on Women, Peace and Security in the Middle East. The event was moderated by Laila Alodaat, WILPF Crisis Response Programme Manager. Alodaat set out the framework for the discussion and introduced the panel. The panel was made up of three women from Yemen, Lybia and Syria.

    Rasha Jarhum is a Yemeni Social Protection Specialist, women’s rights advocate and a 2016 Aspen New Voices fellow. Jarhum spoke first, sharing her experience as a former member of the Yemeni Women’s Pact for Peace and Security brought together by UN Women to partake in formal peace negotiations addressing the ongoing civil war in Yemen. Although Yemen - like Syria - has been heralded at the UN in New York as good practice, local participants see a very different story with serious ongoing challenges. Despite steps forward in including women in some form, existing mechanisms remain too often remain simply efforts to “check the box” and do not create appropriate mechanisms to ensure women’s substantive and meaningful participation. Jarhum called for UN Women, Department of Political Affairs, and supportive member states to ensure that women’s groups are provided expert facilitation that ensures engagement is prioritised rather than sidelined; that they work with the groups to develop clear strategies and planning; that they ensure transparent communications among UN actors and women involved; and that all actors take steps to ensure safe space for discussions which to not increase threats to the women’s personal security. Jarhum concluded by asking how we can move women from a secondary role into a primary one in peacebuilding and encourage better relations between local and international organisations.

    Waad Hamida is an advocate working with civil society to support peacebuilding efforts in the post-conflict state of Libya. Hamida co-founded the Students Peace Movement in Tripoli University and also advocates for the implementation of UNSCR 1325 in Libya. Hamida underscored the impact that conflict has, not only on women in general but, on women civil society in particular. She noted that women in Libya face intimidation because of their work. She argued that the international community needs to ensure that these women keep working and are kept secure at the same time. For this to happen they need extra support from the international community and international NGOs (INGOs) like WILPF. In particular, women civil society in Libya need financial and technical support to monitor implementation of UNSCR 1325. Additionally, the international community has to put extra pressure on governments to include UNSCR 1325 in their agendas. When both the UN and the international community push governments they are more likely to change, albeit slightly. For example, women’s representation in the Libyan government went from less than 10% to 17% in 2012. This is an example of furthering the WPS Agenda by improving women’s participation.

    Sema Nassar is a Syrian human rights advocate working on gender-based violence against women, she is a board member of Urnammu and a member of the EuroMed Rights network. Nassar works with Syrian detainees and forcibly displaced people both in and outside of Syria. From her experience she has noted that a disproportionately high number of women commit suicide following release from detention. This leads us to think about the role of the international community in implementing UNSCR 1325, and devising means of addressing the situations that these women and girls face. Another grave problem in Syria is the use of explosive weapons in highly populated areas. After suffering injury from such weapons, children in particular cannot access medical assistance. These factors lead Nassar to conclude that the international community needs to activate accountability systems in Syria and hold perpetrators accountable for crimes carried out against civilians.

    Alodaat drew the connection between the local and global by noting that for the 2016 universal periodic review of Syria, WILPF had worked with 10 women civil society organisations in Syria to strengthen accountability and international mobilisation for action. Together they highlighted the Syrian government’s shortcomings in, for example, violence against women, torture of human rights defenders and the impact of small arms on women. She further noted the difficulty in seeking accountability of perpetrators in the International Criminal Court for Syria, Yemen and Libya. The international community needs to introduce the idea of transitional justice for those who have been severely affected both in country and as refugees.

    The audience engaged in a lively discussion facilitated by WILPF’s Laila Alodaat. A key question which the audience brought out was, “what can INGOs in New York and elsewhere do to bring attention to critical gaps between grassroots work and work at the international level?” Jarhum suggested that INGOs could carry out external evaluations of peacebuilding initiatives implemented by the UN in conjunction with grassroots activists. This would provide an independent and impartial measure of success as well as noting space for improvement for the UN. Nassar elaborated on this, noting that sometimes UN agencies ask for suggestions and feedback about what they should do however there is no follow up with consolidated results or action plans. INGOs can fill this gap between grassroots movements and the UN system by coordinating global policy with local implementation through amplifying the voices of local women’s rights advocates in global decision-making.




  • 16th Anniversary of United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325: Women, Peace and Security Week (24-28th October)

    What: 16th Anniversary of UNSCR 1325
    Theme: 12 Months On from the Global Study
    When: October 24-28, 2016 
    Where: New York, New York
     

    WILPF International and a special delegation of women peace leaders from Syria, Yemen, and Libya at the 16th Anniversary of UNSCR1325.
    (Photo: WILPF/Marina Kumskova)

    In October 2000, world leaders on peace and security adopted the historical Security Council Resolution 1325, which for the first time recognised women’s important role in conflict prevention through post-conflict reconstruction.

    Last year there was a Global Study on UNSCR 1325 that provided the evidence base for action. One year after the global study and sixteen years after the adoption of UNSCR 1325, where are we now?

    At the 16th anniversary of UNSCR 1315, WILPF worked with grassroots partners and international policymakers to call for concrete action, especially on key gap areas of conflict prevention, disarmament, and financing. We called for feminist action against militarised approaches that ensures accountability on commitments and action for meaningful accomplishments for women at the grassroots level.

    WILPF EVENTS AT THE 16TH ANNIVERSARY OF UNSCR 1325

    One week before the UN Security Council WPS open debate, WILPF launched a Security Council Scorecard on Women, Peace and Security to strengthen accountability for holistic implementation of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda. Although Security Council members have a unique responsibility for peace and security given their role, they also are some of the largest contributors to global military expenditure, which directly contributes to sexual, gender based, and other forms of violence. At the webinar launch of the Scorecard, participants shared how women are affected by arms. We called for more holistic action on the WPS agenda that strengthens the conflict prevention gap including acting on disarmament and women’s human rights.

    During the week of the Security Council WPS Open Debate, WILPF hosted a delegation of women peace leaders including from Syria, Libya, Yemen, and Nigeria and engaged in a variety of events, bilateral meetings, and other engagements for concrete action.

    WILPF Partners from the Middle East North Africa (MENA) region highlighted regional patterns in how gender blind institutions with militarised responses result on ongoing challenges to women’s meaningful participation in peace efforts, how the influx of arms results in dangerous conditions for women and girls, and what women civil society leaders are doing to rebuild communities and promote peace. They participated in a closed WILPF consultation, spoke at a closed round-table at the Swiss mission, held an open side event, and engaged in a variety of bilateral meetings and actions throughout the week.“Women’s experiences and impact of conflict on women are not prioritised and often misrepresented,” said WILPF Crisis Response Programme Manager Laila Alodaat. “We wish to put women’s experience at the heart of intervention strategies.”

    WILPF Global Programmes Director Maria Butler and WILPF-Nigeria President Joy Onyesoh contributed to a closed workshop co-hosted by WILPF together with MenEngage, ICAN and UNDP on Masculinities and Violence in Crisis Settings. Participants explored challenges and assumptions around violent masculinities in conflict situations and action that can be taken to transform these gender norms as part of broader systems of militarism and violence. “Changing system of governance requires transforming masculinities for women’s rights and peace,” said Maria Butler.

    WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Director Abigail Ruane also spoke at an open event co-hosted by WILPF together with the Missions of Australia, Ireland, Spain, and the United Kingdom to the United Nations, as well as UN Women, and the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders on “Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation.”  The event built on WILPF’s launch of the #MoveTheMoney toolkit in September and focused on the importance of concrete action to finance the WPS agenda in order to move from commitments to accomplishments. “We spend trillions on war and pennies on peace; and of course, you get what you pay for,” Abigail Ruane, WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Director, said. “The time is now to move the money from violence and war to peace and gender justice.”

    WPS DEBATE AND ADVOCACY

    The Security Council UNSCR 1325 16th anniversary debate took place on Tuesday 25 October 2016. WILPF monitored the debate, analysed the UN Secretary-General 2016 WPS Report, and worked with the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security to support a civil society speaker from South Sudan.

    Of the 80 member state speakers this year, 46 (57.5 per cent) made new commitments — including 10 financial commitments. However, despite the focus of the WPS debate on follow up to commitments made one year after the Global Study, only 24 (41 per cent) of the 58 concrete commitments made in 2015 were followed up at this year’s debate with accounts on commitment implementation and action. Furthermore, despite  a welcome focus on women’s participation, especially around the inclusion of civil society, militarisation of the discourse was a worrying trend, with strong attention to recruiting women to armed and peacekeeping forces.

    Participants and panelists of the “Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation” event. Photo: WILPF/Anna Warrington.

    Participants and panelists of the “Financing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda: Good Practice and Lessons Learned for Accountability and Implementation” event. Photo: WILPF/Anna Warrington.

    Continuing empty commitments is not enough. We need action! WILPF’s analysis shows that despite commitment at the rhetorical level, we still face a substantial accountability gap in concrete action for change.

    It is critical that as we move forward, we leverage the normative support for the WPS Agenda to address the implementation gap and move from commitments to accomplishments.

    Read our summary of the 2016 WPS debate>>

    Share the Security Council WPS Scorecard>>

    Share the #MoveTheMoney toolkit>>

    Read event summaries for our events:

    Read summaries of events our delegates participated in:




  • Measuring State Commitments to Women, Peace and Security Launch of WILPF´s Expanded WPS Security Council Scorecard
    Wednesday, October 19, 2016 -
    09:00 to 10:00

    Webinar

    On 19 October 2016, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) held a webinar launching the Security Council WPS Scorecard. The Scorecard was designed to strengthen accountability for a holistic implementation of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda and highlighting critical gaps in current efforts of the Permanent Members of the Security Council to implements their commitments.

    The webinar was well attended with participants from across the world and focused on disarmament and conflict prevention as critical components for the holistic implementation of the WPS Agenda. It also highlighted how activists could use the WPS Scorecard to strengthen the local, national and international efforts to strengthen the accountability for States’s failure to implement the WPS Agenda.

    WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Director Abigail Ruane introduced the panel by reminding participants that the 2015 Global Study provided the evidence base for action. “It is time and past time to move from commitments to accomplishments,” Ruane stated. Sixteen years after 1325, there is strong normative support for the WPS agenda: at the 2015 WPS debate, over 110 countries spoke, which was a record on any debate in the history of the Council; there was also a record number of resolution co-sponsors for UNSCR 2242 (75) and civil society speakers (from Iraq, DRC, and Libya). However, although the UN Charter Article 26 affirms that the Security Council is tasked to “promote peace and security with least diversion for armaments, and establish a system for regulating armaments”, the permanent five Council members remain some of the top military spenders. Despite recognition by the three peace and security reviews in 2015 of conflict prevention as a key gap pillar, this contributes to the ongoing conflict prevention gap.

    WILPF Reaching Critical Will Programme Director Ray Acheson shared how militarism and political economies of war directly contribute to sexual, gender-based and other forms of violence. WILPF / Reaching Critical Will’s research has shown how the sale of arms by states including the United Kingdom and France have promoted gender-based violence in Yemen through the Saudi-Arabian-led military intervention, including through the use of explosive weapons in populated areas, and directly violated women’s rights including to adequate housing, health, and education. WILPF has recommended that such countries establish national mechanisms including legislation and policies for rigorous, transparent, and gendered risk assessments of international transfers of arms and export licences, developed in full consultation with civil society organisations, and to deny authorisation of any arms sales or transfers when there is a risk that the weapons would be used to commit or facilitate human rights violations.

    Rasha Jarhum, Aspen New Voices fellow and former member of the Yemeni Women Pact for Peace, shared the impact of armed violence on women in Yemen and what women are doing for peace. Before the war, Yemen was ranked as one of the top ten worst countries for women to live in. Today Yemen is wracked by a humanitarian crisis, with 82 percent of the population in need of humanitarian aid, one third of one third of health facilities damaged, and one third of school aged children (20 percent more girls than boys) not enrolled. Today Yemen also has one of the top firearms per capita countries in the world, with 84 percent of 2012 homicides reported being gun related. Since the conflict started, gender-based violence incidents have increased by 70 percent, with some counts noting 81 per cent of these target women. According to Jarhum, the international community has a critical role to play to stop the violence. As of August 2016, 19 ATT State parties and 3 signatories have either agreed or delivered arms to Saudi Arabia, including UK, USA, and France. She called for action to implement an Arms Embargo to all parties and commit to ATT. She also called for action to fund a humanitarian response plan especially the GBV cluster; implement gender aware disarmament, demobilisation, and reintegration programmes for women and men combatants; support documentation and monitoring of GBV cases and build local NGO capacity on GBV documentation, referrals, services, and shelters; and ensure women meaningful and substantive inclusion in any peace negotiations.

    After this discussion of challenges, WILPF PeaceWomen Programme Associate Marina Kumskova presented WILPF’s Security Council WPS Scorecard as an opportunity for participants to strengthen action advocacy and hold the Permanent Five accountable. The WPS Security Council Scorecard includes a wealth of data from 2010 to 2015 addressing all four WPS pillars (participation, conflict prevention, protection, and relief and recovery). It includes international action including on statements and commitments at the Security Council, international gender and human rights commitments, and gender and peacekeeping action. It also includes national action on financing of military versus gender equality, women's participation in parliament and judiciary, levels of sexual violence, and gendered post-conflict stabilisation programmes. “The Scorecard can be used to strengthen demands by activists for transformative action to implement the WPS Agenda at local, national, and international levels,” Kumskova stated. Leveraging this monitoring and tracking tool at the local level for action is can strengthen support for calls to action on accelerating the WPS Agenda.

    After presentations by speakers, the webinar then moved to a vibrant discussion in the question and answer period. Participants agreed that the UN Security Council has a particular responsibility to implement the WPS Agenda throughout national and international contexts of both war and peace. Activists need to be more creative and mobilising across movements to overturn continuing obstacles, including ongoing restrictions to women’s political participation in peace processes and embarrassingly inadequate funding, due to mis-prioritisation of political economies of war over those of peace and gender justice.

    Moving forward, participants explored ideas for leveraging tools such as the WILPF Scorecard across diverse communities to raise awareness and support for accelerating progress. They affirmed that the Security Council should step up its game to fund and ensure gender aware disarmament, demobilisation, and reintegration programmes; substantially improve and regularise meaningful engagement and consultations with civil society including local women's groups; and take national as well as international action to strengthen conflict prevention efforts including through concrete disarmament action such as by implementing the 2013 Arms Trade Treaty and its gender criterion.

     

    The Scorecard project can be found at http://peacewomen.org/scorecards and a press release for the WPS Scorecard can be read here 

    The recorded video of the Scorecard launch webinar is now available on the WILPF YouTube channel here
     

    Find the Scorecard of Russia here.

    Find the Scorecard of China here

    Find the Scorecard of the United Kingdom here.

    Find the Scorecard of France here

    Find the Scorecard of the United States here.




  • Global Women Leaders Urge Ban Ki Moon to Leave Legacy of Peace in Korea

    September 27, 2016 — As the end of UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon’s term approaches, global women peacemakers urge him to leave a legacy of peace for the Korean Peninsula by using his power to initiate a peace process to replace the 63-year old Armistice Agreement that halted the 1950-53 Korean War with a binding peace accord.

    What: Press Conference by Co-organized by Women Cross DMZ & WILPF. Speakers include:

    • Cora Weiss, President, Hague Appeal for Peace (USA)

    • Kozue Akibayashi, President, WILPF (Japan)

    • Suzy Kim, Professor of Korean History, Rutgers University (USA)

    When: Tuesday, September 27, 2016 at 11 a.m. Eastern Standard Time 

    Where: Church Center for the United Nations, 8th Floor, Boss Room 777 United Nations Plaza (corner of 1st Ave and 44th Street)

    In an open letter signed by over 100 prominent women from 35 countries including many that participated in the Korean War, women leaders urge Ban to definitively deliver on a commitment he made in 2007, “Beyond a peaceful resolution of the nuclear issue with North Korea, we should aim to establish a peace mechanism, through transition from armistice to a permanent peace regimen.” The proposed working group must have a significant representation of women, pursuant to UN Security Council Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace and Security.

    “The Secretary-General has the opportunity to build on his legacy as the world's most important peacemaker,” says Cora Weiss. “Mr. Ban can demonstrate that nuclear threats can be met with a diplomatic recipe of engagement, lifting sanctions, and promise of trade and aid, in exchange for North Korea giving up its nuclear ambition.”

    “The only so-called communication now taking place among Pyongyang, Seoul and Washington is in the form of nuclear tests, B-1 bombers, and threats of surgical strikes,” says Kozue Akibayashi, WILPF International President.

    “This dangerous situation which threatens everyone in the region necessitates dialogue, especially the voices of women peacemakers.” After claiming four million lives, the Korean War was halted on July 27, 1953 when military leaders from the United States, North Korea and China signed the Armistice Agreement and promised to return within three months to work out a peace deal. Suzy Kim, Rutgers University Professor, explains, “The dangerous brinkmanship we witness today, from nuclear weapons tests to military exercises, stems from the historic fact that a peace treaty was never signed.”

    Women leaders call on Secretary-General Ban to take steps now to formally end the Korean War with a peace treaty, which would lead to greater security, not only in Korea, but also globally by countering the escalating militarization in the region and the proliferation of nuclear weapons.




  • Amplifying The Voices Of Women And Girls At The General Assembly’s Refugee Summit

     

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    Panelists and event organisers at the WILPF-supported event hosted by the Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations (Photo: Sarah Tunnell/WILPF/PeaceWomen)

    EVENT  INFORMATION

    • Tuesday, September 20th, 2016, 1:00pm - 2:30pm

    • Permanent Mission of Canada to the UN, 885 2nd Ave, New York, 14th Floor,

     

    ORGANISED BY

    • Women’s International League Peace and Freedom (WILPF)

    • CARE International

    • Women’s Refugee Commission

     

    PANELISTS/PARTICIPANTS

    • Hon Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Canada

    • Zrinka Bralo, Chief Executive of Migrants Organise, Bosnia

    • Sabah Al Hallak, a veteran activist from the Syrian Women’s League

    • Mina Jaf, Founder and Director, Women’s Refugee Route

    • Beth Arthy, Director for Middle East and North Africa Department (MENAD), Department for International Development

    • Amb Miguel Ruiz Cabaňas, Deputy Minister for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights Mexico

     

    As part of WILPF’s ongoing effort to bring the voices of local women to the attention of the international community, WILPF co-sponsored an event with CARE International and the Women's Refugee Commission on September 20, entitled “Women and Girl’s Perspectives on the Refugee and Migrant Summit.” Hosted by the Permanent Mission of Canada to the United Nations, it featured a number of government representatives from Mexico and Canada and women peace activists from civil society organisations in Bosnia, Denmark, the United Kingdom, and Lebanon.

    The discussion focused on the particular challenges faced by displaced women and girls, policy gaps in camps and resettlement states, and how the international community can best respond to improve the lives of female refugees.

    Marie-Claude Bibeau, Minister of International Development and La Francophonie, Canada, introduced the panel by reaffirming Canada’s commitment to displaced women and girls. One of the major deficiencies Canada hopes to address is a systemic lack of access to necessary services such as health and reproductive care, she said. Bibeau additionally emphasised displaced women and girl’s susceptibility to trafficking and other forms of sexual and gender-based violence during migrations and in refugee camps.

    Zrinka Bralo, Chief Executive of Migrants Organise, from Bosnia offered testimony of her experiences as a refugee during the Yugoslav wars, and described simple reforms that could be enacted in camps and domestic asylum processes to improve the challenges women and girls face as refugees. In the United Kingdom, for example, improvements could be made by simply printing two copies of asylum applications so that wives are not rendered entirely dependent on potentially abusive spouses. In camps, Zrinka noted there is stringent implementation of child-care protocols, while gender-care protocols as simple as placing a lock on lavatory doors go ignored.

    Sabah Al Hallak, a veteran activist from the Syrian Women’s League, brought the panel’s attention to weaknesses in the current policies and practices of Lebanon and other governments in protecting and assisting Syrian women and girls, especially around legal barriers to education in Lebanon. She advocated for governments such as Lebanon to provide official documentation to refugees free of charge, and to consider variables such as language and the distance students must travel to school when providing educational services.

    Mina Jaf, Founder and Director, Women’s Refugee Route, was born a refugee. Mina confirmed that the New York Declaration boasted strong Women, Peace and Security language, but reminded listeners that “we have seen this language before- we need implementation.” Unsurprisingly, language was a central issue in her presentation. She stressed that despite legal protections guaranteeing same-sex interpretation, in Greece there are few if any female interpreters available to refugees, which renders reporting sexual and gender-based violence or accessing reproductive healthcare impossible for many women and girls.

    Beth Arthy, Director for Middle East and North Africa Department (MENAD), spoke about the necessity to protect younger generations of refugees, as their loss is also the loss of our future. As Arthy completed her remarks, she stated, “Let us not let the voices of girls fleeing their homes for freedom and education go unheard.”

    Amb Miguel Ruiz Cabaňas, Deputy Minister for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights Mexico, expressed his desire to discover how the international community can become true agents of change. This is particularly vital in light of the increased flow of refugees from Central America. Cabaňas highlighted a contest the Mexican Women’s Institute launched two years ago, titled “Tell Me Your Story.” The contest invited refugee women to share their experiences of migration and integration into their new communities. He remarked that though many of their stories included struggle, the purpose of the project was not to label them as victims, but to understand and celebrate how they overcame their challenges.

    The testimonies offered by the event panellists provided insight into how the international community can incorporate a gender perspective into its policies and practices for women and girls. As Minister Bibeau, stated at the event, “Women and girls are strong agents of change, they are agents of peace, and a key part of any movement.”




  • New #MoveTheMoney Initiative to Boost Funding for Women, Peace and Security

    The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) will on 9 September launch a toolkit to boost action on women, peace and security financing.

    The toolkit, available at www.peacewomen.org/wps-financing, includes a motion graphics explainer video available in five languages, case studies, fact sheets, social media graphics and media guides. It is intended to stimulate advocacy among non-governmental actors, and push the United Nations and national governments to shift their funding focus from war to gender justice and peace.

    WILPF, a non-profit organisation with national sections in 33 countries, produced the toolkit to address the striking disparity between military funding and peace and gender equality funding across the globe.

    “We reject the idea that there is no money for gender justice,” said Abigail Ruane, Director of WILPF’s Women, Peace and Security program (PeaceWomen).

    According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute, in 2015 there was a global military expenditure of $1.6 trillion. Meanwhile only two percent of aid to fragile states in 2012-2013 targeted gender equality as a principal objective, according to the Global Study on UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

    “If the international community wants peace, it needs to invest more in gender equality and social justice policies,” Dr Ruane said.

    “Our toolkit shows that instead of funding war, the UN and member states should invest in gender-responsive budgeting, transparency in defence budgets, National action Plans on Women, Peace, and Security, and civil society-inclusive UN funds.”

    Surveys carried out by WILPF affirm the pressing need for resources to help strengthen women, peace and security financing. In one such survey, almost three-quarters of respondents said that strengthening finance on peace and gender justice was “very important” (8-10 on a scale of 1-10).

    More than 63% of respondents said they were in need to technical support to secure funding on gender and peace work.

    The Interactive Toolkit forms part of a larger Women, Peace and Security Project by WILPF PeaceWomen programme, which also consists of an event for government actors, a civil society workshop and a series of surveys.

    It will be launched at the AWID International Forum in Bahia, Brazil on 9 September.

     

    Read More Here: 

    http://wilpf.org/wilpfs-movethemoney-initiative-to-boost-funding-for-wom...

     




  • WILPF’S ‘Feminist Playbook for Peace’ Builds Non-Violent and Playful Strategies for Transformation at AWID Forum 2016!

    The article provides more information about the WILPF event entitled ‘Feminist Playbook for Peace‘, one of four major sessions aimed at spotlighting opportunities for cross-movement engagement and building collaborative action.

    Read or download the full article below or find the original here.

    _________________________________________________________________________________

     

    WILPF’S ‘FEMINIST PLAYBOOK FOR PEACE’ BUILDS NON-VIOLENT AND PLAYFUL STRATEGIES FOR TRANSFORMATION AT AWID FORUM 2016

    September 23, 2016

    On 10 September 2016, WILPF held our main event at the AWID Forum, entitled ‘Feminist Playbook for Peace‘, one of four major sessions aimed at spotlighting opportunities for cross-movement engagement and building collaborative action.

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    Some of our WILPF delegates enjoying the atmosphere of the Opening Pleanery at the AWID forum 2016, Costa do Sauípe, Bahia, Brazil. Photo: WILPF.

    WHERE ARE WE NOW? TOWARD REBUILDING A SPLINTERING HOUSE FOR ALL

    MADRE Executive Director, Yifat Susskind, introduced the session by asking participants to build on successful strategies for alternative #FeministFutures across movements – such as the LGBTQ movement – to create change: not just among nation states, but in hearts and minds.

    Susskind invited participants to think about our current world as a house that protects some and leaves others out. The house can be understood as our current institutions, especially neoliberalism and the nation state. However, today, cracks are showing. Within this context, Susskind asked: “How do we repurpose our strategies?”

    CONTEXT: FROM MILITARISM AND EXPLOITATION TO GENDER JUSTICE AND PEACE

    WILPF Crisis Response Programme Manager, Laila Alodaat, then shared highlights from WILPF’s 100thanniversary peace summit in April 2016, which brought together 1,000 activists from 80 countries to mobilise around Women’s Power to Stop War.

    At the WILPF 100th summit, activists analysed root causes of war and violence, and called for action to address these root causes for sustainable peace and gender justice. This included analysing gendered power in our world, how militarised economies of violence and war based on violent masculinities create economies of war rather than peace, and how feminist movement building is critical to overturn patriarchy, racism, and corporate power.

    “We must reject the assumption by our governments that they have our consent for violence and hold them accountable,” stated Alodaat. “We are committed to rejecting the heroism of war, and recognising the heroism of peace.”

    KNOWLEDGE IS WITH EVERYONE: ENGAGING DIVERSE ACTORS FOR TRANSFORMATIVE CHANGE

    Oula Ramadan, Badael Foundation, at the Communities and Social Structures breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    Oula Ramadan, Badael Foundation, at the Communities and Social Structures breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    After introductory context, participants broke up into discussion groups around key actors and institutions that must be addressed to realise feminist futures for peace. Participants were invited to explore trends, work needed, and cross-movements opportunities in each group.

    Recognising that we all carry knowledge and expertise, they then were invited to report back and discuss together how different engagement strategies with different actors could be put together like different puzzle pieces to strengthen synergies across movements for transformation and sustainable peace, freedom and justice.

    Breakout groups addressed key actors and institutions for change, including: armed actors, economy/corporations, community/social structure, media, and men.

    HIGHLIGHTS
    ARMED ACTORS

    “Militarisation is an expression of patriarchy.” – Katherine Ronderos, WILPF-Colombia

    “Women have devised strategies for confronting militarisation and armed actors. For example in India, women have stripped and protested rape and killing, took a pledge to honour our women, and submitted India’s first feminist political party to ensure women’s human rights and peace.” – Binalakshmi Nepram, Control Arms Foundation of India

    “We must identify actors and their role, and lead our countries to sign and ratify the Arms Trade Treatyand engage women in negotiations about peace.” – Annie Matundu Mbambi, WILPF-DRC

    María Muñoz, WILPF Human Rights Director, shares from the Economies and Corporations breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    María Muñoz, WILPF Human Rights Director, shares from the Economies and Corporations breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    ECONOMY/CORPORATIONS

    “There has been a hostile take-over of the state: a rise of corporate power and a reduction of state power to provide women’s human security through militarized and exploitative growth that puts profit over people and planet.” – Abigail Ruane, WILPF / PeaceWomen

    “We need to give back the power to the people and to agencies that represent people, perhaps through a global strike. There needs to be a new system where we move the money from military to social expenditures so we can cultivate happiness and listen to our indigenous sisters in protecting mother earth.” – Maria Munoz, WILPF/ Human Rights

    “In Africa, there is extractivism and exploitation of natural resources, and economic structures that do not favour the environment. We have to go to the field, go to people without internet, and report this on and offline, and make companies responsible.” – Bexi Cruz, WILPF-Colombia

    COMMUNITY/SOCIAL STRUCTURE

    “Let us help women break the silence: help them have the power to solve their own solutions.” – Amalkher Djibrine, WILPF-Chad

    “The answer is in the room: women are able to find their own local strategies that lead to peace, prevent conflict, and find solutions to current problems. All that is needed is to support the women who arealready doing the work.” – Oula Ramadan, Badael Foundation

    Sylvie Ndongmo, WILPF- Cameroon, at the Media breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    Sylvie Ndongmo, WILPF- Cameroon, at the Media breakout session. Photo: Orla Sheridan.

    MEDIA

    “Culture and norms on media still stigmatise women.” – Sylvie Ndongmo, WILPF-Cameroon

    “Media production is driven by men and male gaze. We need media and stories led and produced by grassroots women, where women can tell their own stories, in their own words, about what it means to be a woman or man in terms of power and influence. We need to strengthen funding for culture change, and use the power of storytelling to change hearts and minds.” – Jamie Dobie, Peace is Loud

    MEN

    “There are men who are identified as advancing the rights of women, but they have refused to be called feminists, because of the misconception of what feminism is.” – Chioma Okezie, WILPF-Nigeria

    “We need to build idea of men being allies to the feminist movement. Need different strategies for working with men from local community to UN standpoints.” – Marcos Nascimento Promundo, Brazil

    “We must give media the correct tools to engage boys and men, in order to understand, respect, and align their rights to women’s rights.” – Annie Matundu Mbambi, WILPF-DRC

    PUTTING THE PUZZLE TOGETHER 

    WILPF Secretary General Madeleine Rees reflected on how we synergise our strategies among actors for transformative change. “The only way of getting the revolution to happen is for each person to look up,” she stated. “We need to look up and keep our linkages to ensure we are going in the same direction.”

    “If we put all this together, we can create a system that is repaired in the way that we want it to be,” Rees affirmed. “From the community, to the international, from the financial and economic, to the funding of grassroots, we must fund real human rights attainment for political realisation of our ideals.”

    “We also need to move the money,” said Rees. “We can move the money by intelligently working with those who have the money – the Sustainable Development Goals, the trillions of dollars in international financial institutions, development banks, and otherwise – so this money is used as drivers for social change not conflict.”

    WILPF Participants at AWID 'Feminist Playbook for Peace' event. Photo: WILPF.

    WILPF Participants at AWID ‘Feminist Playbook for Peace’ event. Photo: WILPF.

    NEXT STEPS

    As part of our work in moving from a political economy of war to a political economy of peace based on gender justice, WILPF has launched an interactive #MoveTheMoney toolkit to raise awareness of the need to move the money from a political economy of war to a political economy of peace and gender justice.

    Join us in sharing the video (available in English, Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese and French) and social media memes, and calling for your government to #MoveTheMoney!

    Find out more: http://peacewomen.org/WPS-Financing




  • WILPF/PeaceWomen at AWID International 2016

    WILPF’s Women, Peace and Security Programme Director, Dr Abigail Ruane, will be attending the 13th AWID International Forum in Bahia, Brazil on 8-11 September 2016. She will join a WILPF delegation of peace advocates from countries including Cameroon, DRC, Colombia, Chad, UK, Nigeria, India and Syria, who will meet with women’s civil society advocates from around the world to discuss the theme, “Feminist futures: building collective power for rights and justice.”

    The Forum takes places every three to four years in a different region of the world each time including Istanbul, Cape Town, Bangkok and Guadalajara. WILPF participated in AWID’s 12th International Forum in 2012 hosting a session on women’s security and militarism, “From the Beijing Platform to Resolution 1325 - military expenditure and its consequences for women's security”.

    At this forum, WILPF will be hosting a cross-movement session  “Feminist Playbook for Peace”. The session will build on the WILPF’s 2015 peace summit Women’s Power to Stop War (also known as WILPF 100th) and challenge assumptions of patriarchal inevitability and sustainability, to analyse the linkages between, neoliberalism, globalisation, militarism, and conflict and their impact - from local to global. It will explore how to create feminist solutions, strengthen alliances, share practical skills, and construct innovative strategies to transform existing structures, policies and approaches, prevent violence, and bring peace.

    WILPF will be organising, sponsoring and participating in a number of AWID 2016 event, please see our event calendar. Very timely, WILPF’s Women, Peace and Security programme, PeaceWomen, will also be launching its brand new Women, Peace and Security Financing interactive toolkit to raise awareness of the need to #MoveTheMoney from war to peace and gender equality at AWID

    Stay tuned for more information on the Feminist Playbook, the #MoveTheMoney project and other aspects of WILPF’s involvement in the AWID Forum!




  • How to #MoveTheMoney from War to Peace: Reflections on Women, Peace and Security Financing Workshop and Side Event

    Dr. Abigail Ruane contributes analysis of the July 7-8 Workshop for WPS Financing, "Ensuring No One is Left Behind: Financing Gender Equality and Stable, Peaceful Societies for WPS Implementation" and the July 11 Side Event to the High Level Political Forum, identifying challenges and opportunities moving forward with the WPS Agenda in the context of Agenda 2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals. Read the introduction to the analysis below, or read the entire blog post here.




  • Panel Discussion: Indigenous Women at the Forefront of a Strong Global Non-Violent Peace, Security and Disarmament Movement
    Wednesday, May 18, 2016 -
    13:00 to 15:00

    Bahai United Nations Office at 866 United Nations Plaza NY

    On 18 May, WILPF, the Manipur Women Gun Survivor Network and the Control Arms Foundation on India (CAFI) co-sponsored an event at the Baha’i Center in New York entitled “Indigenous Women at the Forefront of a Strong Global Non-Violent, Peace, Security & Disarmament Movement” . The speakers included Maria Butler, WILPF Global Programmes Director; Raja Devasish Roy, Member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous People; Martha Saxton, Professor of History and Sexuality, Women's and Gender Studies at Amherst College; Elsa Stamatopoulou, Professor at Columbia University and Director of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights Program; and Binalakshmi Nepram, Founder of Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network & Control Arms Foundation of India.

    The discussion centered around possibilities for linking the women, peace and security (WPS) movement and the indigenous rights movements together.  Throughout the two-hour event, challenges were addressed, recommendations put forth and historical connections discussed. Ms Butler began by referencing the recent murder of human rights defender Berta Cáceres as a call for the movements on WPS and indigenous peoples to come together. “It is our diversity that is our strength, and we realised that at our WILPF 100,” she said. “Cross-movement building is essential, and that’s why we’re here. We are here to learn how we can work together.”

    Nepram spoke of her work with the Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network, which she co-founded in 2004. More broadly, she also addressed the struggle faced by the women of Manipur, a state in northeastern India. They live under martial law, and the Indian government continues to deny the existence of indigenous groups, and limits their political rights and their right to be the only ones to own land. “This is our land. If we lose it, we lose our identity and our people,” Nepram said.

    She also discussed the women’s movement, Meira Paibis (Indigenous Women Torch Bearers of Manipur), with which they have worked for decades to fight for their rights as indigenous people. She introduced the audience to the concept of “household disarmament,” in which the women of the community keep weapons out of their houses. “We the women know where the weapons are and know what it means to disarm a society,” she said.

    Ms Saxton discussed several historical themes relating to Native American women in the United States and Canada. She addressed the lack of jurisdiction on Native American reservations and the increasing number of raped, killed and missing indigenous women who have received no justice. “There is a law of justice black hole in native communities; you can get on a reservation and no one can touch you,” she noted. Although some NGOs have worked on the issue, there’s no tribal enforcement of, or US funding for, this isue. Ms Saxton therefore called for more documentation on reservations for these women.

    Mr Devasish discussed the historical background of the indigenous community in Bangladesh, specifically in the Chittagong Hill Tracts. He mentioned that during the war for self-determination in the 1970s, rape was used as a tactic of war. He focused on what the chiefs are doing to address issues facing women in the community including inheritance law, child custody, divorce, and political leadership. Since leadership in the tribe is hereditary through the male line, women cannot be leaders; however, an attempt has been made to address this by appointing 150 women local village leaders, some alone and some alongside men.

    The audience was then given an opportunity to contribute to the discussion, and a representative of the Ochapowace Nation in Canada spoke powerfully about the issue of genocide of indigenous peoples and called for the Indigenous Forum to dedicate future discussion to the topic. He put forth seven recommendations for further discussion, and his suggestions were met with applause.

    In closing, Ms Nepram and Ms Stamatopoulou called for further integrated work between the women’s peace movement and the indigenous people’s movement. As Ms Stamatopoulou pointed out, more work at the nexus of these movements would be a powerful step. “[Indigenous women] are subjected to conflict. The extractive industries are taking the last of our resources. If indigenous people are well, we are all well.” Ms Nepram also spoke of how non-violent protest can be more powerful and frightening to the powers-that-be than violence. “A gun in a crutch, not a sign of strength,” she declared. “When unarmed people rise up is when the world starts to get afraid.”




  • It Takes Two to Tango - Roundtable about how to work together on a joint agenda for gender justice with women’s organizations and engaging men&boys field
    Friday, March 18, 2016 - 16:30
    Salvation Army Auditorium

    This round-table dialogue invites an open discussion on trends and their impacts on the field to achieve gender justice for all. The panelists will share their experiences on good practices working with women and men, in gender transformative approaches. And provides opportunity to enhance mutual understanding and identify a joint agenda.

     




  • The Syrian Regional Crisis - A women’s rights perspective on humanitarian action and protection
    Friday, March 18, 2016 -
    11:30 to 13:00

    Bahá'í UN Office 866 United Nations Plaza

    Speakers will include:

    • Hivin Kako, Bihar Relief Organisation, Syria
    • Dima Al-Karadsheh, CARE Jordan
    • Asma Khader, Sisterhood Is Global Institute/Jordan (SIGI/J)  (To be confirmed/invited)
    • Laila Alodaat, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)

    This event will provide a space for activists from Syria and neighbouring countries to share information about the women’s rights impacts of the Syrian regional crisis with particular attention to humanitarian assistance and protection strategies, and the respect of international humanitarian law. The objective is to raise awareness amongst the wider global women’s movement and to encourage advocacy and campaigning actions in solidarity with women and girls inside Syria and in the refugee contexts.

    Registration is required. Please contact advocacy@careinternational.org by March 17th 2016

     




  • The Global Study on UN Security Council Resolution 1325. Strategies for Implementation
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 -
    01:00 to 05:00

    CUNY School of Law, 2 Courts Square, Long Island City

    In 2000, the United Nations Security Council unanimously adopted Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security. Over the past fifteen years, it has become the focal point for the galvanizing worldwide efforts to address the many challenges women face in conflict. However the expectations and advancements of 1325 applied has varied greatly through out the world. In 2013, the Security Council passed Resolution 2122, requesting that the Secretary-General commission the report: A Global Study on the Implementation of Resolution 1325. This study is released at a time of momentous self-reflection and change within the UN and provides a roadmap for the UN to strengthen its responses to conflict, and to ensure that these responses reflect women’s perspectives and engage women’s leadership.

    Building off the first civil society post-report discussion on its implementation held in October 2015 at CUNY Law School, this conference will explore the dimensions to practical implementation of the global study recommendations. The day will be organized in two panels. The first panel will discuss activities local activists are engaged in and the emerging issues since 1325 was passed. The second panel will explore holistic set of measures needed for concrete, practical implementation which spans: consistent implementation by the Security Council, new financing, accountability, and targeted measures to address obstacles and create incentives for women’s participation. Both panels will touch on the convening themes:

    • The undermining of women’s participation by the closing civic space and attacks on women’s human rights defenders.
    • Approaches to address and prevent the root causes of conflict and militarization through a gender analysis.
    • Civil Society support for women’s leadership, participation and rights in all efforts to prevent, reduce and counter terrorism and violent extremism.

    Additionally participations will touch on incorporating a more inclusive and broader approach to the women framework, which takes into consideration a gender perspective of the roles of men and sexual and gender minorities, without compromising the increased efforts towards women’s full and equal participation, protection and human rights in conflict situations




  • BLOODBATH IN SYRIA: WHEREFROM THE WEAPONS?

    The war in Syria has killed over 250,000 people and injured more than one million since 2011. Over 53% of civilian deaths are caused by the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Those fighting on all sides of the conflict use mortars, rockets, and bombs in towns, cities, and villages, which kills civilians, destroys infrastructure, and generates the refugee crisis we see today. More than 11.6 million people are in urgent need of clean water and nearly ten million do not have enough to eat. Nearly 12 million people are refugees or internally displaced.

    Syria is awash with weapons. Ranging from small arms to anti-aircraft rockets to air-dropped bombs, the bloodbath is fueled by the easy availability of weapons looted from caches in Iraq; transferred directly to specific parties by other countries; or diverted from those transfers to unintended recipients.

    This is must be an issue of key concern at the peace talks that are supposed to begin soon in Geneva. One of the largest impediments to peace in Syria is the continuing transfer of weapons to all sides of the conflict. This issue demands critical attention at this round of talks—if profits continue to be made from the war through the sale of weapons, ammunition, and other military equipment, the war will continue.

    It is difficult to trace when some weapons being used in the conflict were transferred and from which country. It is even more difficult, in some cases, to identity specific models of some weapon systems and thus the producer of those weapons. However, WILPF’s Disarmament programme, Reaching Critical Will, has undertaken to track some of these weapons from their use in Syria back to their manufacturers. We do so in order to highlight the companies that are contributing to the ongoing conflict, whether the weapons being used are new or old, whether they were transferred decades ago or recently.

    SYRIAN MILITARY

    Most of the Syrian military’s weapons originally came from the Soviet Union or the former Yugoslavia. Now the government mostly receives weapons from Russia and Iran. It uses the state budget to fund its arms imports – thus the government is using the tax money of the very people it is targeting to finance the weapons it uses against them.

    Dozens of companies in Russia have produced the weapons being used by the Syrian military today. Almaz-Antey Air Defense Concern produces the Buk medium-range land-based missile system and S-200 long-range surface-to-air missiles. Bazalt producesRPG-29 rocket-propelled grenades. The Degtyarev plant produces 9M119 Svir anti-tank guided missiles, 9M133 Kornet anti-tank guided missiles, KPV heavy machine guns, and Kord-12.7mm heavy machine guns. JSC Defense systems, a Russian-Belarusian company, produces S-125 Neva/Pechora surface-to-air missile systems and S-300PMU air defence systems.

    The Defense Industries Organisation (DIO) of Iran has provided the Syrian army with M40 recoilless rifles, which are anti-tank guns. Many seem to have also ended up in the hands of opposition groups. The DIO also provided the Syrian army with AM50 anti-materiel rifles. These were originally exported to Iran from the Austrian company Steyr-Mannlicher in 2006. Iran then cloned the rifles and shipped them to the Syrian army. The DIO also produces and supplies the armour-piercing incendiary bullets fired by the rifles. Meanwhile, the Aerospace Industries Organisation of Iran has provided the Syrian military with Toophan anti-tank missiles, which is a reverse-engineered copy of the US military BGM-71 TOW missile.

    SYRIAN OPPOSITION

    Transfers to the Syrian opposition often follow a more circuitous route to their recipients. For example, several opposition groups including Al-Asala Watanmya, Daraa Revolution Commission, Durou al-Thawra, and Kataib al-Qasas use FN-6 shoulder-fired missiles. These are produced by the China Precision Machinery Import-Export Corporation. Qatar purchased these weapons from an unknown seller, which some investigators believe to be the Sudanese government. Qatar then transferred the FN-6s, via Turkey, to opposition groups affiliated with the Free Syrian Army.

    These are not the only weapons thought to have come from China via Sudan. The Sudanese government is also thought to have sold Chinese-made anti-materiel sniper rifles and anti-tank missiles to Syrian opposition groups. In addition, Sudanese-made 7.62×39-millimeter ammunition has been used by Soquor al-Sham, a group that recognises the Syrian National Coalition’s military command.

    Some of the Syrian opposition’s weapons seem to have come from Croatian stockpiles. In 2012, Saudi Arabia is thought to have financed the purchase of thousands of rifles and hundreds of machine guns, rocket and grenade launchers, and ammunition for opposition fighters from a Croatian-controlled stockpile of former Yugoslav weapons.

    Some weapons also seem to have come directly from the United States. In April 2014, Syrian opposition groups supported by the West said they received about a dozen BGM-71 TOW anti-tank missiles, which were produced by the Hughes Aircraft Company (now part of General Motors). Other weapons used by the Syrian opposition groups are Russian or US-made and seem to have been looted from various caches or retransferred from other countries. Russian company KB Mashinostroyeniya makes many of the man-portable air defence systems (MANPADS) used by various opposition groups. Several groups also use the MILAN anti-tank missile system produced by Euromissile in France.

    ISLAMIC STATE

    Meanwhile, Islamic State (IS), according to a comprehensive report from Amnesty International, uses weapons designed or manufactured by more than 25 countries. The bulk of these arms and ammunition were seized from Iraqi military stocks. IS has also gained access to weapons from other sources, in particular from the capture or sale of Syrian military stocks and arms supplied to armed opposition groups in Syria by countries including Turkey, the Gulf states, and the United States. IS fighters are now equipped with large stocks of mainly AK variant rifles, but also US military issue M16, Chinese CQ, German Heckler & Koch G3 and Belgian FN Herstal FAL type rifles. In addition, IS has captured more sophisticated equipment, such as guided anti-tank missiles (Russian Kornet and Metis systems, Chinese HJ-8, and European MILAN and HOT missiles), and surface-to-air missiles (Chinese FN-6s).

    ARMS TRANSFERS AND PEACE TALKS

    The arming of all sides to this conflict reflects and perpetuates the ongoing militaristic approach to conflict and international relations. The range and quantity of weapons available to those taking up arms to kill in Syria is a product of decades of arms transfers to the region and failures by the US-led occupation of Iraq to manage arms deliveries and stockpiles. These weapons represent billions of dollars spent on technologies of war over decades rather than on peacebuilding, development, and human rights.

    The peace talks must take a different approach. They must confront the ongoing transfer of weapons to all parties in the conflict, using the 2013 Arms Trade Treaty as a basis for action. They must also involve the effective participation of parties who have not taken up arms against each other. Nonviolent actors, including women’s groups, have so far been largely excluded from Syria peace process efforts. This approach must change in order to facilitate a new, nonviolent, effective, community-driven, and sustainable peace process.




2015

  • Feminist roadmap for peace
    Friday, October 30, 2015 -
    15:00 to 16:30

    CCUN 10th Floor

    On 30 October 2015, WILPF PeaceWomen and the Consortium on Gender, Security and Human Rights held a panel, “Feminist Roadmap for Peace” at the Church Center of the United Nations. Consortium Director Carol Cohn conducted the workshop, which aimed to create space to radically rethink, broaden and deepen the current Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

    Participants explored what issues, beyond those commonly thought of as part of the WPS Agenda, need to be added to it if the goal is to transform the structures that impede women’s equal participation in political, economic and social life and foreclose sustainable peace. They discussed in depth how to conduct feminist political economic analysis in the area of road building as an example of how broadening understandings of the WPS Agenda is critical for effective implementation. Building on the idea of a “Feminist Playbook for Sustainable Peace,” they suggested how similar approaches that address gendered power structures are critical sustainable and transformative change.

    Cohn started the discussion by asking participants, “What is the goal of the Women, Peace, and Security Agenda?” Answers included: to end war and create just peace; to transform security institutions to promote gender justice; to challenge the mainstream definition of peace and security to ensure feminist perspectives are reflected; to strengthen women’s participation, protection, and rights in conflict prevention and post-conflict reconstruction processes; to be more inclusive in processes towards social justice; and, simply, gender equality. Cohn then asked participants to hypothetically imagine what the answer would be if this question had been posed to the Security Council. The group agreed that the answers would be merely “participation” and “prevention of conflict-related sexual violence.” This clearly illustrated the disconnection between civil society’s vision for transformative change and the incremental and depoliticised approaches prioritised by governments in discussions today.

    Cohn next challenged the group to define the elements that are missing from the WPS Agenda if it is to be truly transformative. The two most common answers among the group were “full and effective women’s participation” and “implementation.” The discussion then turned to what full and effective participation in peace processes would look like. Cohn noted how a focus on participation often brings with it the hope that if women are at the table, it is not just a change in numbers but also a change in issues and dynamics that is a major goal. Participants recognised that it is not enough for women to be at the table, since women do not automatically advocate for women’s rights. Women are not a homogenous group. Substantive participation depends on which women are present, and whether they bring the voices of women from communities to the table and advocate for nonviolence and transformation of the militarised status quo. However, adding token women does make women more visible and sometimes can be a foot-in-the-door in a formerly all-masculine space, if there is effective space and authority for women to speak and be heard.

    Next, participants addressed the issue of implementation of the WPS Agenda. Cohn brought up the challenge of relying on the Security Council for implementation. For example, five of the six biggest arms dealers in the world are the P5 countries (China, France, Russia, United Kingdom and the United States of America), how do you then bring up small arms and light weapons issues at the Security Council? UNSCR 1325 (2000) and other WPS resolutions are tools, but they have been shaped by the constraints of that body. We need to think about all of the ways in which different international actors are necessary: NGOs, multi-nationals, and non-state parties.

    Finally, participants explored what a feminist analysis of peace would look like in the area of building roads. They explored how and why it is gendered; how it is central to women’s ability to participate in economies, politics, and social life; and what the local and global political economic relations that shape the road infrastructure are and why it is central to the WPS Agenda. Building on small group breakout sessions, they highlighted the importance of recognising that road building is not just a technical exercise that should be seen as an end result, but a process of building societies. Investing in roads build by, for, and around the experiences of men - and not just local men but male representatives of transnational corporations who aim at profit over human rights - can only further reinforce and perpetuate inequality and structural violence. Recognising infrastructure, and non-traditional elements of political economies as connected to the Women, Peace and Security Agenda is critical for preventing conflict and building political economies and infrastructures of gender equality and peace.

     

    Read more about the Peace Forum here




  • Transforming violent masculinities to move the WPS Agenda forward

    ​On 30 October 2015, WILPF facilitated an event with the Men Engage network on “Transforming Violent Masculinities to Move the Women, Peace and Security Agenda forward” in the Church Center of the United Nations. WILPF PeaceWomen’s Abigail Ruane facilitated the event, and participants included: Anthony Keedi (ABAAD Resource Centre for Gender Equality), Dean Peacock (Sonke Gender Justice), Isabelle Geuskens, (Women Peacemakers Program), and Natko Geres (Promundo). The event provided an interactive discussion that brought attention to the need to recognise and transform gendered power structures, transform violent masculinities through non-violence, and engage men as allies with women for effective implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

    Panellists started their discussion by exploring why engaging men and addressing masculinity is important for the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. Women Peacemakers Programme’s Isabelle Gueskens and Promundo’s Natko Geres brought attention to how gendered power hurts men as well as women. According to Geres, “We need to also see the impact that there is in masculinity in conflict zones and that men are victims of violence.” According to Gueskens, “You cannot address patriarchal peace without including men.” ABAAD’s Anthony Keedi noted that men have been socialized to behave in a masculine way without fully understanding patriarchy norms and movement of patriarchal norms. Because men do not have knowledge about gender, they do not understand and can have a negative attitude towards the feminist agenda. Keedi argued that it is important to engage men on a deeper level so that they can contribute and become feminist. Sonke Gender Justice’s Dean Peacock and other panellists shared their experience in working with men to reduce violence against women and militarised violence more generally. According to Dean Peacock, masculinity is used to socialise men to use force and impose hierarchy on gender issues. Changing this requires building men’s understanding and awareness of how patriarchal men act.

    The conversation then moved to explore how it is possible to transform violent masculinities in the work by panellists. Geres highlightd Promundo’s work with engaging with men around healing trauma, addressing police brutality, creating campaigns and social norms around positive models of masculinity. Gueskens, Keedi, and Peacock shared experiences around trainings they have conducted or partnered on. Such trainings build gendered lenses among men and build capacity for women and men alliances on Women, Peace and Security, not only on gender based violence, but also on political issues of militarised masculinity, nonviolence, and peace. Keedi noted that building gender awareness takes time, and highlighted the importance of noting the problems of men’s role in protection through even benevolent sexism. It is not enough to be a “master who treats his pet well.” Peacock noted the importance of soliciting conflict as an opportunity for bringing attention and action for change, as well as the importance of diverse community outreach including community radio on issues such as hate speech and child abuse to engage in national and international legal advocacy, research, and awareness-raising on these issues. 

    Panellists explored key challenges to engaging men and transforming violent masculinities including lack of awareness, patriarchal religious and military institutions, lack of financing. They also highlighted tensions within coalitions working on this issue, including depoliticised approaches and on-going issues of male privilege. Gueskens and Keedi brought attention to the difficulty for activists in engaging with military institutions: while the military may be able to take strides in strengthening women’s participation within it, it is designed for violent conflict resolution, and therefore is structurally opposed to transformative change toward gender equitable and nonviolent peace. Peacock brought attention to the importance of an intersectional perspective that addresses all forms of inequality and violence, including gender but also race, class, economic systems, and sexual orientation and gender identity.

    Finally, panellists discussed recommendations for the way forward on the WPS Agenda. They affirmed that transforming violent masculinities for peace requires going beyond stereotypical assumptions about women being more peaceful than men and men being more violent than women. As Keedi noted: “We can all be strong and peaceful. We are not here to end manhood.” Instead, “we need to focus on structural, policy and cultural issues.” Panellists agreed that it is critical to start with sensitising men, but then move beyond that to address political issues of militarised and masculinised violence from the local to global levels. This means engaging deeply at a local level to build men’s gender awareness and create equal partnerships among women and men for sustainable and equitable action and peace. It means recognising that gender is always deprioritised, even among nonviolent activists such as Martin Luther King Jr., and that moving forward requires not making these same mistakes, but building spaces for dialogue with women and marginalised communities and advocating against country and gender violence.

    Read more about the Peace Forum here




  • People's action plans: empowering civil society to implement 1325
    Thursday, October 29, 2015 -
    15:00 to 16:30

    CCUN 2nd Floor

    On 29 October 2015, the International Institute for Peace Education hosted a panel at the Peace Forum on, “People’s Action Plans: Empowering Civil Society to Implement 1325.”

    Betty Reardon opened the panel by condemning the failure of governments to accept action plans for WPS, at any level, with forward action towards implementation. She addressed the ‘foot-dragging’ reluctance of states to draft action plans that take into account the needs of women on the ground. In addition to National Action Plans, people need to plan themselves and take action to work with grassroots actors and strengthen the movement. This includes regional plans, and alternatives to NAPs with the hope that local strategies will find themselves into full legal structures.

    Asha Hans from Pakistan addressed the issue of security of women on borders, particularly contested borders. She lamented that NAPs often ignore people on the borders, refugees, and those moving because of globalisation. (This concern echoed Dr. Melissa Torres’s presentation at WILPF US’s panel on the localisation of 1325.) Women in contested border zones often suffer plurality of identity, with no commonality of state, religion or agency. Ms. Hans then shifted to discussing the concept of a People’s Action Plan. She suggested that the patriarchal state cannot understand NAPs because of the centrality of women.  In most countries NAPs come from the government and have no link to grassroots actors. She called for a paradigm shift, making it possible to have an action plan without the state. A People’s Action Plan would be bottom-up, making a state accountable and promoting human security. PAPs could also promote transnationalism and work across borders, going back to her original point about WPS challenges in border areas.

    WILPF International President Kozue Akibayashi argued for the creation of a People’s Action Plan by using the example of WPS in Okinawa and the creation of a Japanese NAP. Ms. Akibayashi has worked on the issue of long-term military presence and its effect on the local community in Okinawa. She challenged that NAPs do not intend to demilitarise security - rather they are militarizing women’s security. The Japanese NAP does not include Okinawan women’s groups or other women’s groups in Asia/the Pacific. Areas with a high military presence that are not active conflict zones, such as Okinawa, are not addressed. Despite CSO consultation, the government ended up presenting the NAP without input from CSOs and with the term ‘gender’ excluded in the Japanese language version. Civil society had been pushing for language on foreign military presence and sexual violence, which was taken out of the final NAP. This story demonstrates how the process of creating a NAP can be highly political and important, controversial issues may be left out. Therefore, a People’s Action Plan is a better option for CSOs to make their priorities heard.

    Nicole Goodwin (Veterans Against the Iraq War) shared her experience as an Iraq war veteran who was part of what she now sees as war crimes, and who is now raising her voice against war. She brought attention to the violence both conducted by the military and the violence women in the military experience such as military rape. Her intervention highlighted the importance of mobilising across movements and creating people’s action plans based on diverse experience and action on nonviolent mobilizing for gender equality and peace.

     

    Read more about the Peace Forum here.




  • Strategic Re/Engagements: advancing WPS beyond
    Thursday, October 29, 2015 -
    12:00 to 13:30

    CCUN Boss Room 8th Floor

    On 29 October 2015, WILPF-US held a panel at the Peace Forum, “Strategic Re-Engagements: Advancing Women, Peace and Security and Beyond” at the Church Center of the United Nations. Speakers included Deputy Foreign Minister of Republic of Macedonia Dragana Kiprijanovska and WILPF-US members Kristen Alder, Brandy Robinson, Altaira Hatton, Rachel Nagin, and Melissa Torres. The event explored the role of local efforts to enact UNSCR 1325 and create a dialogue for individuals from multiple levels and perspectives (global to local) to share and learn from each other and explore potential for growth.

    Kristen Alder (WILPF US) opened the discussion by posing the question “How can we create a holistic strategy for advancing Women, Peace, and Security that engages at all levels?” She shared insights from WILPF’s involvement in creating the US NAP. In this process, WILPF US called for: a human security framework, the ratification of CEDAW, inclusion of diverse women in WPS discussions, quotas for women in government, education/engagement of men and boys in ending violence against women, and ending the proliferation of small arms and light weapons. However, most of these recommendations were ignored.

    Alder noted that the current US National Action Plan (NAP) reflects a highly masculinized and militarised state. For one example, the NAP emphasises women in the military and “empowering vulnerable women and girls abroad” rather than addressing issues of gender and militarism at home as well. Further, the NAP also includes “conscious tackling” of the lack of female soldiers and increased deployment of all military in Afghanistan. Overall, the result is that the impact of women in human security is only felt outside of the nation-state and is left open to contextualisation. For third example, Alder noted that NATO is using 1325 as an excuse for increased militarisation and feminising of soldiering; female soldiers act as “ambassadors of goodwill” and soldiering is conflated with peacekeeping so that “protecting” women in conflict means increasing the amount of women present in the conflict. Alder and the other panellists agreed we need a more integrated approach to implementing UNSCR 1325 which seeks to dismantle the gendered aspects of conflict, demilitarisation at all levels, and addresses the shrinking civil society space.

    Deputy Foreign Minister of Macedonia H.E. Dragana Kiprijanovska spoke about the progress made by her country in implementing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. Macedonia has adopted a National Action Plan that aims to strengthen gender perspectives in the state’s security agenda. Ms. Kiprijanovska stressed that Macedonian women must fully enjoy the rights of all citizens and not be excluded from decision-making process. She emphasised that women’s participation is a key factor in sustainable peace.

    WILPF US Representative to the International Board Dr. Melissa Torres discussed how a holistic understanding of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda requires addressing typically ignored issues, such as immigration and trafficking. She highlighted the need to connect action on immigration and trafficking at the US/Mexico border into the US Women, Peace and Security Agenda. Risks and vulnerabilities increase in displaced populations, particularly for women. However this population is completely ignored in the US NAP despite the existence of the TVPA (Trafficking Victim’s Protection Act). She pointed out that the US Department of Justice estimates that 14,500-14,700 foreign-born peoples are trafficked in the US annually, in addition to over 100,000 US citizens, the majority of whom are women. However, the US ignores foreign-born women within US borders in discussions of Women, Peace and Security, and the US NAP mentions trafficking only in regards to other countries. This is problematic for a variety of reasons, including that there is no legal recourse for victims: with the exception of Colombia, Latin American countries are not recognised as conflict-zones; as a result, children from these countries are merely “unaccompanied minors and are not protected by the TVPA. Torres called for implementation of the US NAP to recognise vulnerable groups of women in the US rather than only addressing victims abroad.

    Both Brandy Robinson and Rachel Nagin addressed the question “what can cities do to advance and augment UNSCR 1325?” They stressed the need to change and localise indicators in an urban context, for example looking at the number of women stopped by police. They noted that much of the language in 1325 and Security Council Resolutions focuses on conflict zones. However, the Women, Peace and Security Agenda also relates to non-armed conflicts that the panellists called “urban injustices.” They proposed that 1325 and the Black Lives Matter movement in the US strengthen linkages, since armed conflicts are often symptomatic of latent injustices, such as racial violence and discrimination. Nagin also argued that citizen action plans on 1325 are needed to deal with police violence. Another necessity at the city-level is participatory budgeting and government quotas for women in decision-making positions.

    Finally, Altaira Hatton talked about the unrealised promise of 1325 on conflict resolution. She emphasised the importance of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda providing motivation and inspiration for action; it is essential to make clear why women are valuable in this context. She also discussed the peace movement’s issues with inclusion of minorities. Diverse women across all contexts must be included in developing and implementing this agenda.

    Overall, the discussion highlighted the importance of taking local action to implement the WPS Agenda, including within national contexts of developed countries such as the United States who are often blind to the relevance of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda within national borders WILPF US is dedicated to bringing WPS to cities around the US and advocating for a more localised WPS vision.

     

    Read more about WILPF-US action around UNSCR 1325+15 here.

    Read more about the October 2015 Peace Forum here.




  • Peace Forum: Accelerating the Implementation of the Women, Peace, Security Agenda (UNSCR 1325): Mobilising Women & Men to Work Together

    On 28-30 October 2015, WILPF, in collaboration with the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), Baha’i International Community, International Peace Bureau, United Methodist Women, the National Council of Negro Women, World Council of Churches, Peace Boat US, World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women, APWAPS, Cordaid, Global Movement for the Culture of Peace, and Urgent Action Fund for Women’s Human Rights held a Peace Forum at the Church Center of the United Nations. The Peace Forum created space to engage men and go beyond anniversaries in implementing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

    WILPF contributed to the following panels:




  • After the High-level Review – Connecting Local and Global Action to Implement the WPS Agenda
    Friday, October 23, 2015 -
    16:00 to 17:30

    UNHQ Conference Room 6

    On 23 October 2015, WILPF PeaceWomen, the Mission of Liechtenstein to the UN, and Liechtenstein Institute for Self-Determination at Princeton University held our final Women, Peace and Security lecture series, “After the High Level Review -- Connecting Local and Global Action to Implement the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.” Participants included Liechtenstein Minister of Foreign Affairs H.E. Aurelia Frick, New York University Professor and former UN Women Chief of Peace and Security Anne Marie Goetz, and WILPF-Nigeria President and WILPF International Vice President Joy Onyesoh. The event provided space to discuss lessons learnt, reflect on the outcomes of the High Level Review, and outline recommendations for effective implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda moving forward.

    Liechtenstein Foreign Affairs Minister Aurelia Frick opened the panel by bringing attention to the need expand the conversation on Women, Peace and Security and promote an integrated approach across the UN and between local and global for effective action. This includes engaging more men in the Women, Peace and Security discussion, which UN Women’s He-For-She campaign has successfully brought attention to. The Security Council alone is not enough. The agenda must be integrated more broadly across the UN, including in the Sustainable Development Goals / 2030 Agenda through Goal 5 and Goal 16, and the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit. Funding and political will are also critical. Frick called for WPS champions at all levels, including the Security Council, the UN Secretariat, and the field, and called for global military spending to be reallocated to conflict prevention. 

    New York University Professor and former UN Women Peace and Security Chief Anne Marie Goetz, reflected on how the Women, Peace and Security Agenda is a political agenda, which cannot be implemented without addressing militarised power structures. “This is about power, not bureaucratic procedure,” she stated. She affirmed that the global study should put an end to the on-going challenge of putting Women, Peace and Security issues “later,” and affirmed the need for feminist foreign policy that recognises women’s contributions, provides reparations, redistributes resources, ensures rights, and strengthens women’s voices from the local to global level.

    WILPF-Nigeria President Joy Onyesoh, shared experience from the Nigerian context on how strengthening grassroots activism is critical for sustainable peace. WILPF-Nigeria has developed a train-the-trainers programme, which has trained over 7,200 women in the last two years to use UNSCR 1325 (2000) for economic empowerment and to combat gun violence in their communities. WILPF-Nigeria is also working to document and provide evidence of the work that women peacemakers are doing on the ground. This is especially critical to understand and support in areas such as northeast of Nigeria where women are working to counter violent extremism. She reminded participants that women peacebuilders are already taking action in their communities for peace, disarmament, and gender justice, and that the international community should look for opportunities to strengthen and make this work sustainable. 




  • ATT, UNPOA, & GENDER- BASED VIOLENCE
    Thursday, October 22, 2015 -
    13:15 to 14:30

    Conference Room E, UNHQ

    On 22 October 2015, the Permanent Mission of Denmark, in cooperation with the Reaching Critical Will (RCW) programme of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), hosted a side event on Arms Trade, Small Arms, and Gender Based Violence. Speakers included Ray Acheson and Mia Gandenberger (WILPF Reaching Critical Will), and Katherine Ronderos (WILPF-Colombia).

    Ray Acheson, director of RCW, presented on their recent publication: “Women, Weapons and War.” The paper, as well as exploring the synergies related to gender and women in a number of multilateral instruments such as resolutions, treaties, and commitments on conventional weapons and women's rights and participation, also provided a comprehensive “gendered feminist critique” of these instruments. By offering several concrete recommendations to states and other actors, the final aim of work was to underline problems with categorising women as a vulnerable group, with undermining women's participation and gender diversity in disarmament, with reinforcing violent masculinities, and with perpetuating structures of patriarchal militarism.

    Mia Gandenberger, programme manager at RCW, presented on the recently published work from RCW entitled: Gender-Based Violence and the Arms Trade Treaty. The briefing paper provided some background on the terminology around Gender-Based Violence (GBV) and highlighted relevant questions for risk assessments under Articles 6 and 7 of the Arms Trade Treaty (ATT).  

    Katherine Ronderos, who offered a local perspective on GBV and on the ATT, explaining how they both strongly apply to and influence the local context, made the last intervention. Ronderos analysed the impact of weapons proliferation in Colombia by providing alarming statistics on the number of women killed by illegal guns and the linkages between the abusive use of weapons, also by police and security forces, and sexual violence. Taking Colombia and its over five decades of internal conflict as an example, she expressed the importance of, and necessity for, disarmament and demilitarisation efforts in post-conflict situations.




  • Voices from the Field: A Global Call for Implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda

    On 21 October 2015, WILPF, in collaboration with the Peace Forum organizers (the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), Baha’i International Community, International Peace Bureau, United Methodist Women, the National Council of Negro Women, World Council of Churches, Peace Boat US, World Federation of Methodist and Uniting Church Women, APWAPS, Cordaid, Global Movement for the Culture of Peace, and Urgent Action Fund for Women’s Human Rights) hosted “Voices from the Field: Prelude to the Peace Forum” at the Church Centre of the United Nations.

    WILPF PeaceWomen’s Abigail Ruane facilitated the event with approximately 150 participants joined from over 40 countries worldwide. Speakers included: Jasmin Galace (Women Engaged in Action on 1325, Philippines), Solange Lwashiga (Caucus des Femms pour la Paix, DRC), Paivi Kanisto (UN Women), Danielle Goldberg (Global Network of Women Peacebuidlers), Youssef Mahmoud (International Peace Institute), and Sharon Bhagwan Rolls (FemLINK Pacific), as well as conversation circle facilitators from Morocco, Cameroon, Georgia, Iraq, Spain, India, and the Netherlands. The event created space for civil society to mobilise around recommendations from the UNSCR 1325 (2000) global study and build momentum to strengthen action by civil society, the UN, governments, and other key stakeholders for effective implementation of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. 

    “How can we better strategize? How can we better mobilize?” With these two questions, WILPF PeaceWomen’s Abigail Ruane launched the event, affirming the importance of mobilizing beyond anniversaries. The event then proceeded in two parts. First, a panel of speakers provided an overview of where we are and what we have learned at this 15th anniversary of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. Second, participants broke out into conversation circles to explore insider and outsider strategies on key priority areas for change. Finally, the event concluded with report-backs from the conversation circles, discussion of next steps, and sharing of commitments and calls for action.

    15 Years of UNSCR 1325 (2000)

    After a welcome and discussion of the purpose of the event, women human rights defenders and peace activists shared stories about how they have overcome to inspire group action. Solange Lwashiga (Caucus des Femms pour la Paix) shared about her experience with the campaign, “Rien Sans les Femme” (Nothing Without Women), which successfully mobilised over 50 civil society organisations to change discriminatory electoral laws and establish a quota of 50% of women for parliamentary candidates in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). “Everybody has a responsibility”, stated Lwashiga. “Whoever you are, wherever you are, you have got a responsibility.” Afterwards, Jasmin Galace (Women Engaged in Action on 1325) shared her experience from the Philippines in advocating for investment in women’s rights and peace education and successfully mobilising for the 2013 Arms Trade Treaty (ATT). She brought attention to women’s innovation, education, and dialogue as critical for peace, especially when faced by a world such as before the ATT where bananas were more regulated than arms.

    UN Women Chief of Peace and Security Päivi Kannisto reflected on the previous week’s 15th annual Security Council debate on Women, Peace and Security and launch of the UNSCR 1325 (2000) global study. She highlighted the gains made by UNSCR 2242 (2015), which clearly links women’s participation and durable and sustainable peace, the importance of civil society engagement, and effective financing of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda.

    Global Network of Women Peacebuilders’ Danielle Goldberg overviewed the process and findings of the civil society survey, led by GNWP in coordination with Cortaid, ICAN, and the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security. The survey compiled 317 responses from 71 countries including 17 focus group discussions using a holistic, collaborative, innovative and local approach. On average, it found participants rated the effectiveness of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda as 3.3 on a 6-point scale. It found civil society’s top priority to be a strengthened meaningful participation of women in peace processes to move beyond numbers for impact. Other priorities included strengthening prevention of armed through strengthened financing in girl’s education, women’s livelihood, land rights, and the broader Women, Peace and Security Agenda; addressing root causes of conflict; and building accountability for crimes and violation of women’s rights and gender-based violence.

    International Peace Institute’s Mr. Youssef Mahmoud reminded participants of the need to engage men in implementing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. Building on his experience as a member of the review boards of all three peace reviews this year (on Peace Operations, Peacebuilding, and Women, Peace and Security), Mahmoud recommended that moving forward on effective implementation requires strengthened action for an integrated approach across the UN system to: 1) prevent conflict (a key gap area) and promote sustainable peace, 2) speak to truth to power and more effectively engage men and governments for taking action, and 3) localise peace. “This is not a women’s issue,” he stated “it is a whole society effort for sustainable peace.”

    Finally, FemLINK Pacific’s Sharon Bhagwan Rolls shared opportunities for connecting local to global action from her experience in Fiji and on the Women, Peace and Security High Level Advisory Group. She shared information from civil society strategy discussions the previous week, which bring attention to “the human rights in our security, not the security in our peace.” Bhagwan Rolls also emphasised the importance of engaging with young women around community issues (such as access to water), and strengthening engagement with regional organisations and media including community radio.

    After a panel discussion to provide context, participants broke out into conversation circles on key priority areas to discuss inside and outside strategies for creating change, outline civil society commitments, and share calls to action on priority areas. Discussions centred around the following priority areas: 1) holistic Women, Peace and Security Agenda, 2) strengthened action to prevent violence and address militarism, 3) ensure women’s participation, 4) prevent violent extremism, 5) finance gender equality, 6) engage men and boys and address patriarchal institutions, and 7) create outside strategies for change.

    Build a holistic agenda

    At the conversation circle on building a holistic agenda facilitated by Fatima Outaleb (Union de l'action feminine, Morocco), participants explored what a holistic agenda means and strategies for strengthening this moving forward. Peace, gender, participation and human rights agendas involve different definitions whose diversity needs to be addressed for a rich understanding of gender equality, peace, and human security. They also bring different tools to bear, such as CEDAW, the Beijing Platform, and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. According to one participant, “There is a confusion about what this Agenda is. My government thinks this Agenda is just bettering the lives of the women on the ground, but that’s a limited Agenda.” According to another, “the overall goal is to bring peace and security across the world.” Participants committed to mobilising across movements for a transformative agenda that links local to global and across issue areas to prevent all forms of violence and conflict. They called for strengthened investment in community structures which secure the rights of all people, and which prioritise those most at risk due to gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation and gender identity, nationality, age, ability, or other identification; they emphasised the importance of concrete action to strengthen effective and gender equitable political participation, economic empowerment, and access to justice and comprehensive legal, health, and social services and build women and men’s power to work together for nonviolent social change.

     Strengthen action to prevent violence and address militarism

    At the conversation circle on strengthening action to prevent violence and address militarism, facilitated by Sylvie Ndongmo (WILPF-Cameroon), participants drew attention to the need to strengthen action on prevention as a key gap area by redirecting priorities and creating innovative strategies build political economies of peace rather than political economies of war. It is critical to clearly identify what demilitarisation means and how it impacts people’s lives. Creeping militarism has widespread effects, including: shrinking space for civil society, militarised counter-terrorism measures, and criminalisation and repression of human rights defenders. Activists committed to taking strategic action including to: document the impact of arms on gender based violence, identify countries who facilitate flow of arms, advocate for strengthened education on women’s rights and peace education into curriculums, identify female policyholders to represent local women, creating links between women at national and international levels, and, facilitate access of women’s movements to information. Participants called for governments to implement the global study recommendations especially around scaling down war infrastructure and scaling up peace infrastructure by reducing military spending, taking action on demilitarisation more broadly, and increasing awareness and investment in women’s human rights including through dedicated civil society funding, fully financed gender equality architecture and UNSCR 1325 (2000) National Action Plans, and scaled up investment gender equitable sustainable development and peace. They also committed to engaging non-traditional stakeholders including by building alliances with media houses, educational institutions, and other communications hubs to recognise women not as victims but as powerful agents of change and to strengthen awareness of the obstacles that need to be overcome to create sustainable peace.

    Ensure participation

    At the conversation circle on ensuring women’s meaningful participation facilitated by Elene Rusetskaia (Women’s Information Centre, Georgia), participants strategised on how to strengthen complementary roles of government and civil society to ensure women’s meaningful participation and action on women’s rights. Meaningful rather than token participation is critical. As one participant noted, “we signed the peace agreement in Bosnia 20 years ago, and we agreed to create space for women in [an] election role. Women now represent 17-20% of the Bosnian parliamentary, but the men don’t want women to be strong.” As another participant stated, there must also be “accountability for women in positions of leadership” to ensure substantive inclusion. Participants called for governments to be held accountable to respect the legal political framework and implement laws in a way that ensures women’s equal participation and rights, including through quota systems, both in politics and peace negotiations. Democratic governance requires action before, during, and after conflict to: ensure women civil society are meaningfully included at formal peace tables; recognise informal and local peacemakers as builders of peace; and only recognise peace agreements with women’s full and meaningful participation and rights. Civil society must have strengthened support so as to continue to be able to build capacity for women’s participation and rights such as through trainings, workshops for women leaders, advocacy and outreach, including for young women and across the lifespan. They also called for action to eliminate obstacles to the peace work of women's human rights defenders and peace activists including through repeal of laws that criminalise and restrict women human rights defenders and curtail civil society space, and through investment in political, technical, and financial support for feminist movement building.

    Prevent Violent Extremism

    At the conversation circle on preventing violent extremism facilitated by Suzan Aref (Women Empowerment Organisation, Iraq), participants explored violent extremism as one part of a spectrum of violence and strategised about how to strengthen action to prevent it holistically for more effective impact.  Participants brought attention to how discussions of violent extremism focus too much on a few particular groups, such as ISIS. As one participant noted, “women are over 50% of the population, yet we are still mostly seen as silent victims of conflict.” This means discussions fail to recognise other groups engaged in violent conflict (such as states). It is critical to strengthen outreach with the media to address these limited conceptions and bring attention to how current us-them framing supports Islamophobia and militarised responses, while also providing alternatives based on non-violence, gender equality, and peace.  It is also critical to recognise and strengthen women’s on-going work for peace. As one participant noted, strategies are needed on “how to legitimize women as agents of action.” The group called for governments strengthen international and national action on human rights and humanitarian law including on CEDAW and the Rome Statute, and to work with women’s movements to ensure any action taken on violent extremism does not further put at risk or marginalise communities. Participants committed to leveraging international commitments for accountability, building collaboration with media, and continuing to take action to overturn obstacles to women’s local leadership across movements for peace and gender justice.

    Finance Gender Equality

    At the conversation circle on financing gender equality, facilitated by Maria Villellas Ariño (WILPF-Spain), participants explored formal and informal obstacles to gender financing and strategised on how to use innovative approaches to strengthen sustainable and on-going investment in gender equality and peace. Given that currently only 2% of development funding on peace and security is allocated to gender equality, raising the bar and creating non-traditional approaches and sources of financing is critical. Participants highlighted the need to strengthen traditional financing mechanisms including by fully financing UNSCR 1325 (2000) National Action Plans and spinning up support in the Global Acceleration Instrument. They also highlighted the need to strengthen non-traditional financing sources, including by reducing military spending in line with the Beijing Platform for Action and Agenda 21, reallocate to gender equitable social development (i.e. through the Sustainable Development Goals on peace [goal 16] and gender equality [goal 5]). As one participant stated, “All programmes must be resourced from a human rights direction.” Participants committed to build coalitions, including among women’s rights, disarmament, and women’s peace and security activists, and leverage local elections and other political spaces for raising awareness and strengthening support on gender financing and action.

    Engaging Men and Boys and Addressing Patriarchal Institutions

    At the conversation circle on engaging men and boys and addressing patriarchal institutions, facilitated by Anand Pawar (SANAM: South Asian Network to Address Masculinities, India), participants discussed some of the tensions between engaging men, on one hand, and addressing patriarchal institutions, on the other; they also explored strategies for overcoming personal to political obstacles for sustainable peace. As one participant noted, “the Women, Peace and Security Agenda is preaching to the converted.” Engaging non-traditional stakeholders and power holders including men is therefore critical for effective change. However, engaging men without addressing patriarchal systems of power is not enough. As another participant stated, “It is only by men and women working together that makes peace in communities attainable.” Engaging men must be done from this perspective so as to overcome obstacles to equality, and transform society for justice and peace. This requires a two-part approach: first, it requires sensitising men, such as through games and gender awareness raising in boys clubs; second, it requires connecting the personal to the political, and highlighting how violent masculinities support violence from the personal such as through domestic abuse and battering to the international level through militarism and war. Participants committed to creating spaces for men as well as women to engage men and boys in our families, communities, and world to recognise and take action to transform gendered structures of power and privilege for non-violence, gender justice, and peace. They called for action to build the capacity of masculine leaders for gender responsive analysis and action including through trainings, incentives, and accountability measures to ensure the development and implementation of policies and programmes that ensure women’s full and equal participation and rights. They also called for action to build political will and accountability for international financial institutions, transnational corporations (including private military corporations), religious institutions, and other patriarchal institutions to be held accountable for upholding women’s full and equal rights

    Outside strategies for change

    At the conversation circle on outside strategies for change, facilitated by Paula Banerjee (University of Calcutta, India) and Isabelle Geuskens (Women Peacemakers Programme, Netherlands), participants explored how to use creative and non-traditional tactics and strategies from an outside perspective to create change. Participants defined inside and outside strategies based on positioning relative to established institutions.  “Insiders are the establishment; the government; the UN; the corporate media,” said one participant. “Outside is an unsafe space. When it is an unsafe space, you have a different perspective. You’re looking for change.” Participants explored how activists have used outside spaces to challenge comfort zones, such as the women from Liberia who stripped naked to demand peace. Participants highlighted the risks associated with outside strategies and the importance of finding allies, building solidarity, and learning between movements to strengthen good practice in creating change and addressing insecurities and risks. They committed to strengthening collaboration to build outside strategies as complementary to inside strategies for change, and to bridging bridges across movements for solidarity to prevent violence and promote active non-violence, feminist foreign policy, gender justice, and peace. They also called for more traditional stakeholders to strengthen investment and political support for building knowledge, capacity, skills, and trust with grassroots activists and community actors to build solidarity and provide better tools for strategizing and mobilising.

    Call to Action

    The event concluded with report-backs from the conversation circles, discussion of next steps, and sharing of commitments and calls for action.  




  • Global Study on UNSC Res 1325 - A Conversation with Radhika Coomaraswamy
    Thursday, October 15, 2015 -
    10:00 to 12:00

    CUNY School of Law, Dave Fields Auditorium, 2 Courts Square, Long Island City

    On 15 October 2015, WILPF and MADRE, with support from the Sorensen Centre at CUNY Law School, facilitated a civil society launch of the global study on UNSCR 1325 (2000) and discussion with global study lead author Radhika Coomaraswamy. WILPF Secretary General Madeleine Rees moderated discussion with lead author and key feminist peace leaders including Charlotte Bunch (CWGL), Leymah Gbowee (Gbowee Peace Foundation), Pramila Patten (CEDAW), Bandana Rana (Saathi), and Yifat Susskind (MADRE). The event provided an alternative civil society space to explore how to implement study recommendations and strengthen feminist movement mobilisation for action moving forward.

    Radhika Coomaraswamy began the discussion by reflecting her key take-away from the global study process and recommendations. “No to militarization, yes to prevention - that is what women claim,” she stated. Coomaraswamy highlighted the need for demilitarisation and a decrease in military spending as key take-away of the global study’s roadmap for sustainable conflict prevention and peace. She recognised the importance of the study being an independent report (rather than a UN consensus document) and emphasised how it built on global consultations on UNSCR 1325 (2000) around the world. Coomaraswamy also noted the importance of listening to grassroots women, noting that different regions had different priority areas (e.g., a focus on military spending and advancement of UNSCR 1325 (2000) National Action Plans in Western Europe and a focus on empowerment, safety and funding for women’s organisations in Nepal and other developing countries). 

    Given the focus of the new Resolution (UNSCR 2242) and the on-going debate on violent extremism, Coomaraswamy noted with concern a blurring of lines between military and civilian agendas in connecting Women, Peace and Security with counterterrorism discussions. Participants explored how the blurring of these lines risks reducing funding to women's human rights defenders and peace activists due to redirection of funds to military “protectors,” and actively undermining a holistic agenda including by further reducing civil society space through militarised anti-terrorism and anti-extremism measures.

    Following Coomaraswamy’s introduction the panel explored strategies for addressing obstacles to key gap areas on the Women, Peace and Security Agenda as addressed by the global study. In the area of peacebuilding, the consensus on the panel was that there is not enough mapping of what is already being done at the local level. Participants affirmed that the feminist peace movement must continue to raise the bar in our vision and action for change.

    Nobel Peace Laureate Leymah Gbowee emphasised the interrelationship between justice and women’s participation. “Wars are fought today on the bodies of women - they can no longer be excluded from participating,” she held. “When women are left out of the first stage of peace and rebuilding, it becomes impossible for them to have access to justice.” Panellists stressed that prosecutions are still very few; there is still a need for systems that will punish perpetrators, provide reparations to survivors, and address systemic challenges to lack of justice at the national level.

    The remainder of the discussion focused on how to better implement UNSCR 1325 (2000) moving forward. Bandana Rana from Saathi spoke on the need to keep hope despite challenges, and raise awareness of the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. She used the example of Nepal, where the government has implemented a National Action Plan and stipulated in the new constitution that 33% of women must be included in government. However, despite policy, the situation on the ground remains “business as usual.” Many other attendees were concerned with funding issues, in particular the lack of funding commitments made at the Security Council Open Debate on Women, Peace, and Security, and their embarrassingly low level of ambition, especially in comparison to military expenditures.

    Liesl Grentholtz from Human Rights Watch expressed concern that the Women, Peace and Security Agenda is undermined by the closing of Civil Society space and attacks on human rights defenders. While civil society is clearly becoming a critical resource for implementing the Women, Peace and Security Agenda, rather than merely the “creators,” civilian groups in peace processes remain dominantly male. Furthermore, accountability is still far from reality and all voices are not being heard. One issue is that UN entities can blockade input from groups critical of governments. This highlights a lack of accountability that is essential to effective implementation. 

    Fifteen years ago the emphasis was on building women’s institutions, then the focus shifted to measuring legislation, now the emphasis is on tracking the number of women at high level meetings or the number of references to women in Resolutions. Panellists voiced concern that Women, Peace and Security activists have moved too far away from the actual desired impacts (e.g. safety, economic empowerment) and that there is a need to shift attention back to grassroots efforts. According to Yifat Susskind of MADRE, “we have to shift the gaze back to the experiences and demands of women on the ground if we are to advance this agenda.” Charlotte Bunch of the Centre for Women’s Global Leadership brought attention to the fact that, while the Women, Peace and Security Agenda has been successful in changing discourse and raising awareness, strategies are still needed to bring change from the UN to the ground.

    Participants recognised that current challenges have developed from the successes of developing a strong normative framework on Women, Peace, and Security over the last fifteen years. They explored how to broaden and deepen discussions and action on Women, Peace and Security to move from norms to action. Together they recognised the global study as a clear body of evidence and tool, and committed to continuing to work together for action moving forward. As Coomaraswamy reiterated, “The most important message on the Global Study is the call for action.”




  • South Asia's Ongoing Conflicts and Women Peace Efforts in the Region
    Friday, July 24, 2015 -
    10:30 to 13:00

    Baha'i International Community United Nations Office

    Join us on 24 July 2015 for a discussion and film screening on South Asia's ongoing conflicts and women's peace efforts in the region. Special guest Binalakshmi Nepram will share highlights from her work with the Manipur Women Gun Survivors Network (MWGSN). Bina is a disarmament activist-writer from the Manipur state in Northeast India. Her work is significant in highlighting the link between rising militarization and the increase on violence against women—particularly sexual violence. 




  • Walking the Line: Women Cross De-Militarised Zone (DMZ) for Peace
    Thursday, July 23, 2015 -
    13:15 to 14:30

    Conference Room 3 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York

    Fifteen years after the creation of UNSCR 1325 and the Women, Peace and Security Agenda, women’s participation, protection and rights remain unfulfilled. This event in our ongoing Women, Peace and Security lecture series will feature a briefing from the women participants in a recent one-week long journey with North and South Korean women, and their historic crossing of the DMZ, their findings and message for the continued advocacy of ending the Korean War, division of millions of families, and reliance on militarisation. 




  • The World Humanitarian Summit – A historic opportunity for the WPS Agenda
    Tuesday, July 21, 2015 -
    15:00 to 17:00

    Conference Room 5 at the United Nations Headquarters in New York

    2015 is a crucial year for the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda: a global study on its implementation is currently underway and the Security Council will hold a high-level review of resolution 1325 in October. Consistent implementation is one of the biggest challenges to the WPS agenda and there continues to be a lack of awareness of the need to include a gender perspective at all levels of humanitarian work. The World Humanitarian Summit in Istanbul in May 2016 is meant to serve as a catalyst for a comprehensive reform of the humanitarian sector towards more effectiveness. It has been stated numerous times that women play a key role in this regard. The Summit will therefore be a historic opportunity for advocates of the WPS agenda to guarantee that women are well-positioned, front and center, to influence humanitarian efforts. This side event creates a forum for Member States, UN and civil society stakeholders to discuss strategies to ensure that women will not be left out of discussions around the World Humanitarian Summit next year and the process to follow.    




  • Women's Rights to Dignity, Security and Justice: The Rana Plaza Disaster's Human Consequences and Legal Accountability
    Saturday, March 14, 2015 -
    11:30 to 16:00

    Fordham Law Center at Lincoln Center

    This event is co-sponsored by the Pasos Peace Museum, the International Institute on Peace Education, the Network for Peace through Dialogue, Connect, World Council for Curriculum, and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). This program, the third in a series of CSW symposia focusing on crimes against women, their struggle for justice, and possibilities for establishing the criminal culpability and liability of the violators of their rights, will be based on the presentation of quilts memorializing the women victims of the Rana Plaza collapse (Bangladesh 2012) and the Triangle Fire (New York 1911). An interactive program includes viewing and discussing the messages of the quilts, a panel on the development of the quilts with cooperation from survivors, art forms for educating and raising public awareness, and discussion of possibilities for legal accountability. 

    Event Details: Sign in at 11:30 for coffee and interactive process. Panel at noon followed by discussion and further interaction on strategies for justice. 

    RSVP: info@i-i-p-e.org 

    Location: Fordham Law Center, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023 

    For More Information: www.i-i-p-e.org/csw15 




  • Women’s Rights to Dignity, Security and Justice. The Rana Plaza Collapse and the Triangle Fire: Consequences and Accountability
    Saturday, March 14, 2015 -
    11:30 to 16:00

    Fordham Law Center at Lincoln Center

    This event is co-sponsored by the Pasos Peace Museum, the International Institute on Peace Education, the Network for Peace through Dialogue, Connect, World Council for Curriculum, and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). This program, the third in a series of CSW symposia focusing on crimes against women, their struggle for justice, and possibilities for establishing the criminal culpability and liability of the violators of their rights, will be based on the presentation of quilts memorializing the women victims of the Rana Plaza collapse (Bangladesh 2012) and the Triangle Fire (New York 1911). An interactive program includes viewing and discussing the messages of the quilts, a panel on the development of the quilts with cooperation from survivors, art forms for educating and raising public awareness, and discussion of possibilities for legal accountability. 

    Event Details: Sign in at 11:30 for coffee and interactive process. Panel at noon followed by discussion and further interaction on strategies for justice. 

    RSVP: info@i-i-p-e.org 

    Location: Fordham Law Center, 140 West 62nd Street, New York, NY 10023 

    For More Information: www.i-i-p-e.org/csw15 




  • Beijing Peace Train (CSW)
    Friday, March 13, 2015 -
    10:30 to 12:00

    Church Centre of the UN - Chapel NYC

    UN Commission on the Status of Women – Session 59 - Panel 

    BEIJING PEACE TRAIN & BEYOND – WOMEN'S MEMORIES & TESTIMOMIALS 

    Friday, March 13, 2015 - 10:30 to 12:00

    A stimulating panel on the Beijing Peace Train and stories of solidarity in movement. The Peace Train to Beijing tells the story of 230 women and 10 men from 42 countries who cross two continents to reach the Fourth UN Conference on Women (August 7-29,1995). The train was sponsored and organized by the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). During the three-week trek from Helsinki, Finland, participants meet with women's groups and political leaders, and put theory into practice as they create a "metaphorical community" on the train.

    Free and open to the public. 

    Location: Church Centre of the UN - Chapel NYC

     




  • Beijing Peace Train
    Friday, March 13, 2015 -
    10:30 to 12:00

    Church Centre of the UN - Chapel NYC

    UN Commission on the Status of Women – Session 59 - Panel 

    BEIJING PEACE TRAIN & BEYOND – WOMEN'S MEMORIES & TESTIMOMIALS 

    Friday, March 13, 2015 - 10:30 to 12:00

    A stimulating panel on the Beijing Peace Train and stories of solidarity in movement. The Peace Train to Beijing tells the story of 230 women and 10 men from 42 countries who cross two continents to reach the Fourth UN Conference on Women (August 7-29,1995). The train was sponsored and organized by the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). During the three-week trek from Helsinki, Finland, participants meet with women's groups and political leaders, and put theory into practice as they create a "metaphorical community" on the train.

    Free and open to the public. 

    Location: Church Centre of the UN - Chapel NYC




  • Sexual Violence in Conflict: Accountability, Achievements and Challenges
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 -
    15:00 to 16:30

    Conference Room E
    Program: - Three cases of sexual violence in armed conflict - Sexual violence in armed conflict & mechanism of human rights in UN - Women's movement against sexual violence in conflict Organised by: Women's Human Rights Commission of Korea


  • Sexual Violence in Conflict: Accountability, Achievements and Challenges
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 -
    15:00 to 16:30

    UN Conference Room E

    Program: - Three cases of sexual violence in armed conflict - Sexual violence in armed conflict & mechanism of human rights in UN - Women's movement against sexual violence in conflict Organised by: Women's Human Rights Commission of Korea




  • Linking the Women, Peace & Security and Arms Control Agendas
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 -
    11:30 to 12:45

    Australian Mission to the United Nations 150 East 42nd St 33rd Floor
    Fifteen years ago, in an effort to address the exclusion of women in peace and security matters, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security (WPS). This side event will highlight recent developments at the global policy level linking WPS with the international arms control and disarmament agendas. Presentations will focus on the relevance of arms control to the protection of human rights, and the prevention of armed violence and sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Trends in uses of explosive weapons will be analysed through a gender lens, as will the effects of the arms trade and illicit trafficking in small arms. As the international community looks towards the post-2015 development agenda, the connections between violence, security and development are being debated. Ways in which military spending can be diverted for gender-responsive development will be explored. Evidence identifies young men as the primary actors in contemporary violence – indeed, men make up 95 percent of homicide perpetrators, and most frequently take up arms to fight in wars (UNODC, 2013). The session will consider ways in which gender norms drive armed violence, why young males are the key perpetrators, and how this phenomenon can be tackled. Using the case study of the Philippines, practical ways to implement national action plans on WPS and advance small arms controls with women engaged in decision-making will be shared. This side event will bring to light the important role of women’s organisations in controlling weapons and reducing the devastating effects of armed violence worldwide. This side event will bring to light the important role of women’s organisations in controlling weapons and reducing the devastating effects of armed violence worldwide.


  • Linking the Women, Peace & Security and Arms Control Agendas
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 -
    11:30 to 12:45

    Australian Mission to the United Nations 150 East 42nd St 33rd Floor

    Fifteen years ago, in an effort to address the exclusion of women in peace and security matters, the UN Security Council adopted Resolution 1325 on Women, Peace, and Security (WPS). This side event will highlight recent developments at the global policy level linking WPS with the international arms control and disarmament agendas. Presentations will focus on the relevance of arms control to the protection of human rights, and the prevention of armed violence and sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV). Trends in uses of explosive weapons will be analysed through a gender lens, as will the effects of the arms trade and illicit trafficking in small arms. As the international community looks towards the post-2015 development agenda, the connections between violence, security and development are being debated. Ways in which military spending can be diverted for gender-responsive development will be explored. Evidence identifies young men as the primary actors in contemporary violence – indeed, men make up 95 percent of homicide perpetrators, and most frequently take up arms to fight in wars (UNODC, 2013). The session will consider ways in which gender norms drive armed violence, why young males are the key perpetrators, and how this phenomenon can be tackled. Using the case study of the Philippines, practical ways to implement national action plans on WPS and advance small arms controls with women engaged in decision-making will be shared. This side event will bring to light the important role of women’s organisations in controlling weapons and reducing the devastating effects of armed violence worldwide. This side event will bring to light the important role of women’s organisations in controlling weapons and reducing the devastating effects of armed violence worldwide.




  • Institutional Mechanisms, Human rights and Armed Conflict: Assessing the Situation for Women and Girls
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 -
    08:30 to 10:00

    Salvation Army Auditorium

    The Beijing Platform for Action covered 12 critical areas of concern. This seminar will discuss three of the areas – institutional mechanisms, human rights and armed conflict. The seminar will be moderated by Dr. Jan Marie Fritz, Professor (University of Cincinnati and the University of Johannesburg) and editor of 'Moving Toward a Just Peace.'

    Featured Speaker: Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury (Former UN Under-Secretary General and High Representative)

    It is co-sponosored by the International Sociological Association (ISA), the Clinical Sociology Division (RC46) of ISA, Criminologists without Borders and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

    Location: Salvation Army, Auditorium 120-130 West 14th St, New York City, NY




  • Institutional Mechanisms, Human Rights and Armed Conflict: Assessing the Situation for Women and Girls
    Thursday, March 12, 2015 - 08:30
    Salvation Army Auditorium

    The Beijing Platform for Action covered 12 critical areas of concern. This seminar will discuss three of the areas – institutional mechanisms, human rights and armed conflict. The seminar will be moderated by Dr. Jan Marie Fritz, Professor (University of Cincinnati and the University of Johannesburg) and editor of 'Moving Toward a Just Peace.'

    Featured Speaker: Ambassador Anwarul Chowdhury (Former UN Under-Secretary General and High Representative)

    It is co-sponosored by the International Sociological Association (ISA), the Clinical Sociology Division (RC46) of ISA, Criminologists without Borders and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF).

    Location: Salvation Army, Auditorium 120-130 West 14th St, New York City, NY




  • Celebrating 100 Years of Women Peacemakers
    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 -
    17:00 to 19:30

    New York Public Library

    Under the banner Women’s Power to Stop War, thousands of  peace activists from around the world are gathering this spring to change the conversation on peacemaking.

    In the Hague, Netherlands, The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF),the longest-serving women’s peace organization in the world, is commemorating its 100th anniversary on Arpil 27, 2015 by bringing together activists, thinkers and decision-makers at its international conference, Women’s Power to Stop War. Joining forces with organizations like the Nobel Women’s Initiative and the International Peace Bureau, WILPF aims to offer a different way of thinking about peacemaking, while celebrating the work of its founding mothers who braved underwater mines and submarines to join 1300 women from neutral and belligerent countries in the Hague to try to put an end to World War I.

    In an associated event, in New York City, on March 11, 2015, women peace activists will celebrate WILPF’s 100th anniversary at the New York Public Library. The library houses the unique Schwimmer-Lloyd Collection, a repository of early WILPF and WWI newspaper clippings, reports and photographs assembled by two pacifists and founding members of WILPF, Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary and Lola Maverick Lloyd of the US. Schwimmer and Lloyd sought to promote mediation and conciliation as an alternative to war, and their writings, along with many others’, will be on display at the Library. A performance piece by Robin Lloyd and Charlotte Dennett, “Talking with Our Grandmothers”, traces the heroic efforts of these early peacemakers while adding fresh insights into the causes of World War I. WILPF Secretary-General Madeleine Rees will give a keynote address on issues facing women in the Middle East.

    The events in the Hague and New York (the latter to be held the same week as the annual UN Conference on the Status of Women), will offer guidelines to today’s peace activists in how to participate in political processes more effectively. “Peace and Security is still a man’s game” notes WILPF-US President Mary Hanson Harrison,“ as we saw in the failed Syrian peace-talks.   Endless war and vast global military budgets continue while people-centered goals of improving of education, combating racism and xenophobia, ensuring food security, supporting participatory democracy and protecting our environment are left at the bottom of the barrel.  Women have a vital role to play in changing that.” WILPF is proud that SCR 1325, passed by the UN Security Council in 2000, mandates that women’s voices be heard in war prevention and resolution, and was presaged by WILPF’s foremothers, trying to stop wwI.

    Madeleine Rees, WILPF International’s Secretary General based in Geneva, is committed to making the international community take SCR 1325 seriously. She points out that the United Nations was founded with the aim of saving future generations from the ‘scourge of war’, but today, more than 70 years later, there are still approximately 50 ongoing conflicts taking place at this time. Asks Rees: ‘When are we going to get it -- that more guns do not equal more security?’ 

    The events in the Hague and New York City are open to the public, and men are urged to attend.  

     

    WHAT: 

    100th Anniversary Celebration of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, featuring the New York Public Library’s exhibition of the Schwimmer-Lloyd Collection of early WILPF and WWI newspaper clippings, reports and photographs assembled by WILFP founders Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary and Lola Maverick Lloyd of the U.S..

    There will also be a performance by Robin Lloyd and Charlotte Dennett entitled, “Talking With Our Grandmothers,” in which they share history of war and the Women's Peace movement through conversations with and about their Grandmothers.

     

    WHEN:

    Wednesday, March 11, 5:00 – 7:30pm

     

    WHERE:

    The New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building 42nd Street and 5th Ave. (South Court Auditorium), New York City

     

    WHO:

    * International WILPF Secretary-General Madeleine Rees, who previously served as the Head of the Women’s Rights and Gender Unit for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, will give a keynote address on issues facing women in the Middle East.

    * WILPF US President, Mary Hansen Harrison WILPF

    * Historians: CUNY professor Harriet Alonso, author of Peace as a Women's Issue; Wellesley Professor Catia Confortini, author of Intelligent Compassion: Feminist Critical Methodology in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; Editor and Publisher of The NationKatrina vanden Heuvel

     

    HOW:

    This event is free and open to the public. Members of the press should RSVP to Shayna Samuels:Shayna@ripplestrategies.com or 718-541-4785 




  • Celebrating 100 Years of Women Peacemakers
    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 -
    17:00 to 19:30

    New York Public Library

    Under the banner Women’s Power to Stop War, thousands of  peace activists from around the world are gathering this spring to change the conversation on peacemaking.

    In the Hague, Netherlands, The Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF),the longest-serving women’s peace organization in the world, is commemorating its 100th anniversary on Arpil 27, 2015 by bringing together activists, thinkers and decision-makers at its international conference, Women’s Power to Stop War. Joining forces with organizations like the Nobel Women’s Initiative and the International Peace Bureau, WILPF aims to offer a different way of thinking about peacemaking, while celebrating the work of its founding mothers who braved underwater mines and submarines to join 1300 women from neutral and belligerent countries in the Hague to try to put an end to World War I.

    In an associated event, in New York City, on March 11, 2015, women peace activists will celebrate WILPF’s 100th anniversary at the New York Public Library. The library houses the unique Schwimmer-Lloyd Collection, a repository of early WILPF and WWI newspaper clippings, reports and photographs assembled by two pacifists and founding members of WILPF, Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary and Lola Maverick Lloyd of the US. Schwimmer and Lloyd sought to promote mediation and conciliation as an alternative to war, and their writings, along with many others’, will be on display at the Library. A performance piece by Robin Lloyd and Charlotte Dennett, “Talking with Our Grandmothers”, traces the heroic efforts of these early peacemakers while adding fresh insights into the causes of World War I. WILPF Secretary-General Madeleine Rees will give a keynote address on issues facing women in the Middle East.

    The events in the Hague and New York (the latter to be held the same week as the annual UN Conference on the Status of Women), will offer guidelines to today’s peace activists in how to participate in political processes more effectively. “Peace and Security is still a man’s game” notes WILPF-US President Mary Hanson Harrison,“ as we saw in the failed Syrian peace-talks.   Endless war and vast global military budgets continue while people-centered goals of improving of education, combating racism and xenophobia, ensuring food security, supporting participatory democracy and protecting our environment are left at the bottom of the barrel.  Women have a vital role to play in changing that.” WILPF is proud that SCR 1325, passed by the UN Security Council in 2000, mandates that women’s voices be heard in war prevention and resolution, and was presaged by WILPF’s foremothers, trying to stop wwI.

    Madeleine Rees, WILPF International’s Secretary General based in Geneva, is committed to making the international community take SCR 1325 seriously. She points out that the United Nations was founded with the aim of saving future generations from the ‘scourge of war’, but today, more than 70 years later, there are still approximately 50 ongoing conflicts taking place at this time. Asks Rees: ‘When are we going to get it -- that more guns do not equal more security?’ 

    The events in the Hague and New York City are open to the public, and men are urged to attend.  

     

    WHAT: 

    100th Anniversary Celebration of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom, featuring the New York Public Library’s exhibition of the Schwimmer-Lloyd Collection of early WILPF and WWI newspaper clippings, reports and photographs assembled by WILFP founders Rosika Schwimmer of Hungary and Lola Maverick Lloyd of the U.S..

    There will also be a performance by Robin Lloyd and Charlotte Dennett entitled, “Talking With Our Grandmothers,” in which they share history of war and the Women's Peace movement through conversations with and about their Grandmothers.

     

    WHEN:

    Wednesday, March 11, 5:00 – 7:30pm

     

    WHERE:

    The New York Public Library, Stephen A. Schwarzman Building 42nd Street and 5th Ave. (South Court Auditorium), New York City

     

    WHO:

    * International WILPF Secretary-General Madeleine Rees, who previously served as the Head of the Women’s Rights and Gender Unit for the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights, will give a keynote address on issues facing women in the Middle East.

    * WILPF US President, Mary Hansen Harrison WILPF

    * Historians: CUNY professor Harriet Alonso, author of Peace as a Women's Issue; Wellesley Professor Catia Confortini, author of Intelligent Compassion: Feminist Critical Methodology in the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom; Editor and Publisher of The Nation Katrina vanden Heuvel

     

    HOW:

    This event is free and open to the public. Members of the press should RSVP to Shayna Samuels: Shayna@ripplestrategies.com or 718-541-4785 




  • Civil Society Consultation on the 2015 WPS High-Level Review: March 2015
    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 -
    10:30 to 12:30

    Armenian Convention Center

    This event is co-sponsored by the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), Women's Action for Nuclear Disarmament (WAND), and the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights.  Civil society advocates and activists from around the world will meet in New York  so as to discuss the Security Council's high-level review of the progress at the global, regional and national levels in implementing UNSC Resolution 1325 (2000) and to engage within this consultative process. 

    To contribute and build on these discussion and provide strategic input into the development and finalization of the high level review, we invite women civil society leaders to participate in a follow-up consultation at the 59th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women. This event will provide updates from the high level advisory group, and present initial findings of the civil society survey facilitated by GNWP and engage in more focused discussions on emerging challenges and possible strategies to leverage 2015 as a critical year to move forward implementation of the WPS agenda. With this event, we also aim to enhance integration of WPS issues in strategic fora at the UN, including in the Beijing +20 Review and Post2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) agenda, and strengthen coordination and localization of international policy discussions with grassroots stakeholders.

    Speakers include: 

    Madeleine Rees, Secretary General, Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) 
    Mavic Cabrera-Balleza, International Coordinator of the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP) 
    Louise Allen, Executive Coordinator of the NGO Working Group on Women Peace and Security 
    Nahla Valji, Policy Adviser and Officer in Charge, Peace and Security Section, UN Women (UNWOMEN)

    Location: Armernian Convention Center, Ballroom 2, 630 2nd Avenue (at 35th street), New York, NY 10017. 




  • A TRANSFORMATIVE WOMEN, PEACE & SECURITY AGENDA: THE NEED TO CHALLENGE MILITARISM
    Wednesday, March 11, 2015 -
    06:15 to 07:45

    Church Center
    This is event is co-sponsored by the Women Peacemakers Program (WPP), Safer World, the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights, SAMYAK and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). Join this important discussion on the linkages between gender & militarism and need for a transformative approach towards the Women, Peace and Security agenda. The session will consist of: - An overview of the global gendered trends and developments of current conflict resolution mechanisms from a holistic gender approach, including a masculinities perspective, with a case study from South Asia; - An evaluation of current UNSCR 1325 implementation and the missing links to achieve transformative change for gender-sensitive peacebuilding; - An overview of activities and initiatives aimed at transforming the peace & security framework through de-militarization and disarmament. - Please be advised that capacity constraints may limit participation and confirmation of participation is required. Please RSVP no later than March 9, 3 pm to Ms. Thalia Malmberg, Women Peacemakers Program (WPP) intern@womenpeacemakersprogram.org Location: UN Church Center, 777 UN Plaza (at the corner of 44th Street and 1st Ave)


  • A Transformative Women, Peace & Security Agenda: The Need to Challenge Militarism
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 -
    18:15 to 20:15

    UN Church Center

    This is event is co-sponsored by the  Women Peacemakers Program (WPP), Safer World, the Consortium on Gender, Security, and Human Rights, SAMYAK and the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). Join this important discussion on the linkages between gender & militarism and need for a transformative approach towards the Women, Peace and Security agenda.

    The session will consist of: 

    • An overview of the global gendered trends and developments of current conflict resolution mechanisms from a holistic gender approach, including a masculinities perspective, with a case study from South Asia;
    • An evaluation of current UNSCR 1325 implementation and the missing links to achieve transformative change for gender-sensitive peacebuilding;
    • An overview of activities and initiatives aimed at transforming the peace & security framework through de-militarization and disarmament. 

    Please be advised that capacity constraints may limit participation and confirmation of participation is required.

    Please RSVP no later than March 9, 3 pm to Ms. Thalia Malmberg, Women Peacemakers Program (WPP) intern@womenpeacemakersprogram.org

    Location: UN Church Center, 777 UN Plaza (at the corner of 44th Street and 1st Ave)




  • Women Peace Leaders Meet & Greet
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 -
    12:30 to 14:00

    Armenian Convention Center

    Join WILPF members and partners from around the world for an informal meet and greet to connect, build collaborations, engage in creative action for change, and explore how to strengthen our shared work for women's power to stop war among women peace leaders. 

    WHO: WILPF and friends 

    WHAT: Women Peace Leader Meet & Greet

    WHEN: Tuesday 12:30PM-2:00PM

    WHERE: Location: Armenian Convention Center, Ballroom 2, 630 2nd Avenue (at 35th street), New York, NY 10017

     




  • Closed Briefing: ‘Empowering Women’s Human Rights Defenders in Iraq and Syria’
  • Realizing Gender Equality, Women’s Human Rights & Women’s Empowerment Beyond the Post 2015 Development Agenda
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 -
    11:30 to 12:45

    Conference Room 11 UNGA Building
    Join women leaders from different regions in a discussion on how women’s rights, gender equality, and women’s empowerment can be realized beyond 2015 in light of the 20 ­year review of the Beijing Platform for Action and the new global framework for a sustainable development agenda.


  • Amplifying the Voices of Palestinian Women within the Women Peace and Security Agenda
    Tuesday, March 10, 2015 -
    10:30 to 12:00

    Armenian Convention Center Guild Hall
    Palestinian women and civil society continue to be excluded from any formal processes related to resolution of the conflict in Palestine. A number of women’s organisations are proactively collaborating to advocate for women’s rights and call for the implementation of international mechanisms to safeguard their status. Women’s rights organisations are particularly important at this stage because of their collective actions in communities and the connection they create between peace, justice and gender equality. Join the panel with Palestinian women activists and hear their recommendations to ensure women’s crucial role in a political transformation towards a sustainable solution.


  • Above the Parapet - Women in Public Life
    Monday, March 9, 2015 -
    13:15 to 14:30

    Trusteeship Council Chamber, UN Headquarters, New York

    LSE’s research project Above the Parapet, at the Institute of Public Affairs, seeks to capture the experiences of senior women who have shaped public life. It aims to identify the contexts and individual factors that shape women’s journeys into senior life in several fields.

    In light of the CSW focus on the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action, including current challenges for its implementation and the achievement of gender equality and women’s empowerment, this meeting will share relevant emerging lessons and hear from women about their own journeys. We look forward to sharing and to hearing from you at this side event.

    Chair:

    • Dr Aurelia Frick, Liechtenstein’s Minister for Foreign Affairs, Education and Culture Panellists

    Panelists:

    • Dr Joyce Banda, former President of Malawi (2012-2014) and second female Head of State in Africa

    • Zainab Hawa Bangura, Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary General on Sexual Violence in Conflict and former Minister of Foreign Affairs of Sierra Leone

    • Madeleine Rees OBE, Secretary General of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom

    • Dr Agnes Callamard, Director of the Colombia University’s Global Freedom of Expression Project and former Director of Article 19

    • Dr Purna Sen, Deputy Director of the Institute of Public Affairs at the London School of Economics and Political Science and former Head of Human Rights, Commonwealth Secretariat

    Please RSVP to antonia.strachwitz@nyc.llv.li. For further information on the project please visit www.lse.ac.uk/AbovetheParapet, see twitter @LSEParapet or contact ipa.parapet@lse.ac.uk.




  • Women Confronting ISIS: Local Strategies and States’ Responsibilities
    Friday, March 6, 2015 -
    09:00 to 17:00

    CUNY Law School

    This Symposium offers a unique and timely opportunity to engage with locally-based Iraqi and Syrian women activists working across sectarian lines, as well as international experts to address the crisis of women's human rights in areas controlled by the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). Participants will explore the relationship between gender-based abuses under ISIS and State-sanctioned discrimination and violence against women, highlighting lessons for policymakers and women's rights advocates in diverse contexts of political and armed conflict. Sponsored by: The Sorensen Center for International Peace and Justice, MADRE, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF), Nobel Women’s Initiative (NWI), the Organization for Women’s Freedom in Iraq (OWFI)

    Free and open to the public.Lunch provided with RSVP. CLE credits available.

    Location: CUNY Law School, Dave Fields Auditorium (2 Court Sq., Long Island City)




  • CSW 59 Events One-Pager (March 6 Updated)
    Thursday, March 5, 2015 - 17:45
    CSW
  • Breaking the Silence: Monologues on Gender, Voice and Violence
    Friday, February 20, 2015 -
    13:15 to 14:30

    UN Conference Room 5

    On Friday, 20th February 2015, The PeaceWomen Programme along with the Mission of Liechtenstein and the Liechtenstein Institute for Self-Determination at Princeton University organized the most unique Lecture Series yet. The event featured a series of monologues created by Suzan Craig and Katrina Syran with Human Rights Watch and WILPF, aimed at humanizing the discourse around issues of violence around the conflict spectrum. 

    The monologues  titled "Breaking the Silence: Monologues on Gender, Voice and Violence", and performed by actors Katarina Syran, Adam James, Fraser James, Charlotte Longfield, Amelia Donkor and Gemma Aston, addressed issues ranging from modern day slavery to war time violence against men and sexual slavery, to forced virginity testing. Through individual stories, the performances conveyed powerful messages of escape, determination and catharsis, such as, "wings are not only for birds, they are for minds," and "no one can take anything from you, if you don't give it to them." 

    The monologues were reminder of the importance of women's participation and role during conflict and post-conflict settings, and the power of theater as a vehicle of expression for women. 
     




2014

  • Boko Haram and Cycles of Violence: Strengthening Prevention Using the Women Peace and Security Agenda
    Thursday, October 30, 2014 - 16:00
    UN Headquarters - Conference Room 6

    October 30, 2014
    UN Headquarters, Conference Room 6
    16:00-17:30

     

    It has been more than six months since 276 girls were captured by Boko Haram in Chibok, Nigeria. Most of them are still missing today. Women and girls face increased risk of human rights abuses, such as abductions, sexual and gender based violence and discrimination, as well as restricted access to resources, education, and decision-making processes. In this event, women from Nigeria and Cameroon will share their work and experiences about the root causes of conflict and abductions. Prevention strategies will be discussed including strengthening the social and economic rights of women, enhancing opportunities for political participation, as well as investing in gender equitable institutions, and reducing militarism and arms.

    To read the entire report on the event, click here.

    To watch the video of this event, click here.

    Click here for the flyer.




  • WILPF at the Security Council Open Debate on Women, Peace and Security: 1325 + 14

    October 2014
    UN Headquarters, New York

    Women peace leaders from all over the world came together at the 14th anniversary of UN Security Council Resolution 1325 to advocate, strategize, and act to hold accountable the international community on the Women, Peace and Security Agenda. WILPF hosted a delegation of women peace leaders from sections and partners in Syria, Iraq, Nigeria, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Colombia, Libya, Cameroon, Jordan, and Lebanon. Together, we built solidarity through sharing our experiences, engaged in advocacy and outreach, and took action to strengthen violence prevention, disarmament, and women’s full and equal participation and rights. We joined together to demand not just commitments but accomplishments for gender equality, disarmament and peace.

    Read more here >>




  • Women, Peace and Security - A Critical Component to the Post-2015 Development Agenda

    Thursday, 31 July 2014
    UN Headquarters, Conference Room 3
     13:15-14:30

    On 31 July 2014, the PeaceWomen Programme, in co-operation with the Mission of Liechtenstein and the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination/Princeton University, hosted a panel discussion as part of our Women, Peace and Security Lecture Series, on the important relationship between the Women, Peace and Security agenda and the post-2015 development agenda. This lecture featured keynote speaker Amina J. Mohammed, Special Advisor to the Secretary-General on Post-2015 Development Planning. Abigail Ruane, PeaceWomen Manager, Ambassador Christian Wenaweser of Liechtenstein and Ambassador Greta Gunnarsdottir of Iceland were also a part of the panel discussion.

    To read the entire report on the event, click here.

    To watch the video of this event, click here.

    Click here for the flyer.




  • INVEST IN WOMEN FOR PEACE Conflict Prevention & Women's Participation in Ukraine

    Wednesday, 21 May 2014
    UN Headquarters, Conference Room B
    15:00-16.30

    On May 21, 2014, PeaceWomen hosted a panel discussion on conflict prevention and women’s participation in Ukraine as part of its Lecture Series on Women, Peace and Security (WPS). Co-sponsored by the Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the United Nations and the Liechtenstein Institute on Self Determination at Princeton University, this panel discussion focused on two pillars of the WPS Agenda: prevention and participation. Current military tensions have put women’s rights and participation increasingly at risk in Ukraine. Natalia Karbowska, a Ukrainian women’s leader, and Grigore Pop-Eleches, Associate Professor at Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs discussed the conflict in Ukraine and women’s full and equal participation in shaping Ukraine’s future.

    To read the entire report on the event, click here.




  • WILPF at the 58th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women

    March 2014
    Headquarters, New York

    WILPF members had an energizing experience at CSW 58, where 75 activists and advocates from the WILPF global network joined over 3000 other civil society participants at hundreds of events in a two week long hustle and bustle around UN Headquarters. WILPFers came from Syria, Nigeria, Pakistan, Colombia, Geneva and many places in between. We united as a delegation to collectively raise our voices and bring attention to the fact that you get what you pay for, and there can be no peace or development without disarmament and women’s full and equal human rights.

    Together, we spoke fiercely and truthfully. We organized 10 successful events and we mobilized and build momentum around WILPF’s 100th anniversary movement recognizing Women’s Power to Stop War! Thanks to everyone who joined us and shared a photo in our #100Women4Peace photo campaign or engaged with our unprecedented social media discussions through #CSW58 #WILPF100 #DisarmSDGs!

    Read full update here >>




  • COMMISSION ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN SESSION 58 Access to Technology: Breaking Down Barriers to a Holistic Women, Peace and Security agenda

    Thursday, 13 March, 2014
    UN Headquarters, Conference Room C
    10:00-11.15am

    On March 13 2014, the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom held an event with the Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein to the UN, Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination at Princeton University on how to leverage innovation, ideas and partnerships to strengthen women’s peace activism and impact. It was also the formal launch of the WILPF PeaceWomen expanded Women, Peace and Security (WPS) mobile application.

    The panel illustrated how to leverage innovation, partnerships, and ideas to strengthen impact and change. According to ABAAD Founder Ghida Anani, “To create change, you have to build a model that makes the old system obsolete.” Anani spoke about the importance of teaching youth and women to use social media to make their words and photos reach out to the international community, and her work with ABAAD on this in the Middle East and North African (MENA) region: “Technology can help overcome a gap between activism and academia and support women’s truths.” WITNESS Senior Bukeni Warunzi highlighted the importance of addressing risks of gender based violence rather than treating technology as a panacea within the context of WITNESS’s use of human rights videos to promote accountability and justice. He cautioned that technology should be used carefully to promote security especially for those in situations of risk.

    WILPF’s PeaceWomen Program Director Maria Butler, one of main founders of the PeaceWomen’s WPS mobile application, introduced PeaceWomen’s app as one innovative way to communicate the Women, Peace and Security agenda. She discussed how civil society as well as policy makers can use it to challenge systemic gender resistance by including a gender perspective in global and national policy, and called on attendees to push the boundaries to ensure a holistic implementation of the Women, Peace and Security agenda. Finally, WILPF Secretary General Madeleine Rees called for strengthened efforts to connect the dots between diverse agendas in a way that addresses gendered risks while leveraging innovation and partnerships for change.

    For more information on this event, click here.




  • REPRESENTATIVES FROM: SYRIAN WOMEN’S LEAGUE, SYRIAN WOMEN’S NETWORK, AND SYRIAN WOMEN FOR DEMOCRACY Women's Participation and WPS Accountability in Syria: Geneva II Peace Negotiations and Beyond

    Thursday, 16 January, 2014 
    UN North Lawn Building, Room 4 
    1:15-2:30pm

    This side event created a forum for member state and civil society stakeholders to learn more about women’s experiences in the Syrian conflict and recommendations for transition, accountability and peace. The representatives of Syria civil society will spoke about what can be done to realize the objectives of resolution 2122 (2013) and the wider Women, Peace, and Security agenda in the Syrian context. The discussions included: how to strengthen women’s full and equal participation in discussions on Syria’s future; the gender impact of the Syria conflict, including conflict-related sexual violence and other gender-based violations; recommending a series of actions for the Security Council, United Nations and the international community. As part of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF)’s ongoing work to promote peace and freedom through disarmament and women’s full and equal participation and rights, WILPF has been working with Syrian women to effectively engage with political transition processes in Syria and specifically focused on recommendations for Geneva II peace negotiations.




2013

  • ANNE-MARIE GOETZ, CHIEF ADVISOR, PEACE AND SECURITY, UN WOMEN Women, Peace, Security: Looking Ahead to 2015

    Monday, 18 November, 2013 
    UN North Lawn Building, Room 7 
    1:15-2:30pm

    The Chief Advisor for UN Women on Peace and Security discussed recent policy developments on Women, Peace and Security, including the passing of two Resolutions 2106 and 2122, and the recent Global Review on National and Regional Implementation (held November 5-7, 2013). Anne-Marie Goetz addressed opportunities and challenges for 2015, the High-Level Review and study. She also provided some findings from the expert Global Review on National and Regional Implementation. 

    To watch the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here for the flyer. 
    You can read our coverage of the event here




  • NAVI PILLAY, HIGH COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS Accountability – An Essential Element of the WPS Agenda

    Monday, 21 October, 2013 
    UN North Lawn Building, Room 7
    1:15-2:30pm

    Women and girls continue to experience all forms of physical, sexual, and psychological violence in modern conflicts and crisis. For far too many women who have been victims of serious wartime crimes, prospects of having the perpetrators brought to justice are very remote, as are prospects of reparations for the harms suffered. Promoting accountability for violence that women and girls have suffered during conflict, political strife, and instability is essential.

    Without accountability, human rights will be denied, crime will flourish, and impunity for past crimes will persist, undermining legitimacy and prospects for reconciliation. Accountability should be intended as encompassing processes, norms, and structures to hold individuals and entities accountable for their actions, impose adequate sanctions, ensure remedies for survivors, address impunity for past crimes, and avoid repetitions of violations in the future. Such processes, norms, and structures must be built on fundamental principles of equality and non-discrimination and fully take into account women’s and girls’ experience of conflict and instability. In this lecture, Navi Pillay, High Commissioner for Human Rights, highlighted the importance of accountability for an effective implementation of the women, peace and security agenda and outlined challenges and promising practices concerning the integration of a gender perspective in criminal prosecution, reparations, truth and reconciliation commissions and institutional reforms.

    To watch the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here to access the High Commissioner's speech. 




  • EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF WOMEN FOR AFGHAN WOMEN MS. MANIZHA NADERI The Situation of Women in Afghanistan: 2014 and Beyond

    Friday, September 13th, 2013
    UN North Lawn Building, Room 6
    1:15-2:30pm

    The implementation of the UN’s Women, Peace and Security agenda is widespread. On the participation side, the representation and active involvement of women in political processes remain limited. 

    There is, moreover, an acute risk that women will effectively be excluded from peace talks with the Taliban, with the result that the fragile rights women have gained in Afghanistan since 2002 will be negotiated away in a formal peace process in which they have no substantive voice. With more than a decade of experience confronting these challenges on the ground, Manizha Naderi, Executive Director of Women for Afghan Women, offered her thoughts on the potential impacts of the troop drawdown and negotiations with the Taliban for women in Afghanistan, and the importance of civil society groups such as Women for Afghan Women in protecting women on a day-to-day basis.

    To view the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here to read the summary of the event.




  • GARY BARKER, INTERNATIONAL DIRECTOR OF PROMUNDO Men, Peace and Security: Engaging Men and Boys to Promote Gender Equality and Eliminate Gender-Based Violence

    Tuesday, July 9th, 2013 
    UN North Lawn Building (NLB) Room 6   
    1:15PM-2:30PM

    The topic of Women, Peace and Security has become recognized as a key issue in global discussions today. It is rare to question men’s role in these discussions, yet creating partnerships with men is critical to establishing gender equality and ending gender based violence. Recognizing the importance of these partnerships, this part of the WPS series featured the work of Promundo, a Brazilian-based NGO with offices in Rwanda and Washington, DC, which works to engage men and boys in gender equality and violence prevention. Their work has included coordinating research on men and masculinities in several post-conflict settings, including Rwanda, DRC, Burundi, and the Balkans. In this lecture, Promundo International Director Gary Barker presented findings from this research as well as experiences from their work to engage men as change agents in the context of post-conflict settings.

    Click here to read the full summary of the event. 

    Click here to view the flyer for the event.




  • MS. LAKSHMI PURI, ACTING HEAD OF UN WOMEN AND UN ASSISTANT SECRETARY-GENERAL Justice, Security, and Women's Leadership - UN Women's Priorities in Combating Violence against Women in Conflict

    Friday, June 7th, 2013  
    Trusteeship Council Chamber
    1:15PM-2:30PM

    Over the past six years there have been important advances in the implementation of UN Security Council resolution 1325, including an increased focus by the Security Council on the issue of conflict-related sexual violence. In the spirit of UN SC resolution 1325 (2000), UN Women is committed to ensuring that all efforts to implement the Security Council’s women, peace and security resolutions are guided by a commitment to women’s leadership and gender equality. In her lecture, Ms. Lakshmi Puri, Acting Head of UN Women and UN Assistant Secretary-General, analyzed recent normative and operational developments in the effort to prevent violence against women during and after conflict, review UN Women’s own contributions, and argued that protection efforts are inseparable from efforts to empower women and build their leadership capacities.

    To view the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here to view the flyer for the event.




  • SARAH COSTA, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE WOMEN’S REFUGEE COMMISSION Relief and Recovery Pillar: Reflections on Opportunities and Gaps for Displaced Women and Girls

    Thursday, May 23, 2013
    Women's Refugee Commission, 122 East 42nd Street, 11 Floor
    1:15-2:30pm

    The Relief and Recovery Pillar of the Women, Peace and Security agenda focuses on ensuring that relief needs specific to women and girls are met and that special attention is paid to the most vulnerable, including displaced women and girls, survivors of gender based violence, and those with disabilities. It also calls for efforts to support women’s activities as agents in relief and recovery efforts, including providing women with equal access to livelihoods activities. Costa focused on the situation of displaced women and girls and discuss areas where there has been progress, as well as highlighted ongoing challenges and possible ways to meet them.

    Click here to view the flyer for the event.

    To view a summary for this event, click here.




  • WILPF at the 57th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women

    March 2013
    United Nations Headquarters, New York

    WILPF members and partners participated from every region of the world at the 57th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) (2013). “WILPF participation in this year’s Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) was historic and highlighted our global outreach as a women’s peace movement”, commented Madeleine Rees, WILPF Secretary General. Our delegation included WILPF members and partners from over 25 countries (Democratic Republic of Congo, Costa Rica, Colombia, UK, US, Sweden, Canada, Japan, Australia, Lebanon, Morocco, Yemen, Tunisia, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Libya, France, China, Kenya, Spain, Ireland, Norway, Switzerland, and Nigeria).

    Read full update here >>




  • HILDE F. JOHNSON, SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE OF THE SG AND HEAD OF THE UNITED NATIONS MISSION IN THE REPUBLIC OF SOUTH SUDAN Women's Empowerment in South Sudan: A look at Gender-Responsive Peacekeeping in Practice

    Monday, 4 March 2013
    UN North Lawn Building (CR D)
    1:15-2:30pm

    In peacekeeping operations, the implementation of the WPS agenda depends on strong leadership in mainstreaming gender within missions. SRSG Johnson talked about her responsibilities and experiences as UNMISS Head of Mission in ensuring a gender-responsive peacekeeping operation.

    To watch the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here to view the flyer for the event.




  • RAGHIDA DERGHAM, FOUNDER AND EXECUTIVE CHAIRPERSON OF THE BEIRUT INSTITUTE Women as Policy Makers and Agents of Change
    Monday, February 11, 2013 - 01:15
    UN North Lawn Building (CR 5)

    Monday, 11 February 2013
    UN North Lawn Building (CR 5)
    1.15 – 2.30 pm

    The Participation Pillar of the Women, Peace and Security agenda focuses on women’s representation and participation in peace processes, electoral processes (as both candidates and voters) and UN decision-making positions. However progress has been slow and challenging. Ms. Raghida Dergham,
 Founder and Executive Chairman, Beirut Institute, discussed the role of women as policy makers and agents of change as well as strategies to increase their participation in matters related to peace and security.

    Click here to view a summary for this event.




  • DR. ALISON L. BODEN, DEAN OF RELIGIOUS LIFE AND THE CHAPEL AT PRINCETON UNIVERSITY The Arab Spring and Women’s Rights

    Tuesday, 22 January 2013  
    UN North Lawn Building (CR 5)
    1.15 – 2.30 pm

    Dr. Alison L. Boden, Dean of Religious Life and the Chapel at Princeton University, talked about The Arab Spring and Women’s Rights. In the Middle East and North Africa the extraordinary political events since February 2011 have on the one hand opened new opportunities, but on the other hand also created new threats to women’s human rights and their participation in political process.

    The event was a part of a lecture series on Women, Peace and Security organized by the Permanent Mission of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the United Nations in New York in close partnership with the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination (LISD) at Princeton University, and the PeaceWomen Programme of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom. The series seeks to support implementation efforts and awareness-raising of the WPS agenda through a series of panel discussions in New York followed by lectures at Princeton University.




2012

  • H.E. MS. FATOU BENSOUDA, CHIEF PROSECUTOR OF INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT ​Fighting Impunity for Sexual and Gender-Based Crimes

    Wednesday, 12 December 2012 
    UN North Lawn Building (CR 1)
    3.00 - 5.00 pm

    The Chief Prosecutor of International Criminal Court, H.E. Ms. Fatou Bensouda spoke about the work of the International Criminal Court to prevent and prosecute sexual and gender-based crimes.

    The event was the launch of a lecture series on Women, Peace and Security organized by the Permanent Mission of the Principality of Liechtenstein to the United Nations in New York in close partnership with the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination (LISD) at Princeton University, and the PeaceWomen Project of the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom.

    To watch the entire video of this event, click here.

    Click here for the Chief Prosecutor's speech. 




  • PROFESSOR CYNTHIA ENLOE, RESEARCH PROFESSOR AT CLARK UNIVERSITY. Women and Militarization Before, During and After Wars: A Feminist Approach to the Women Peace and Security Agenda

    Wednesday, 14 November 2012
    UN Church Center, 777 United Nations Plaza, NY
    10.00 - 11.30 am

    On 14th November 2012, PeaceWomen in partnership with the Liechtenstein Institute on Self-Determination and Permanent Mission of Liechtenstein were pleased to host Professor Cynthia Enloe, research professor at Clark University (and WILPF member), as a part of a new lecture series on the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) agenda.

    Professor Cynthia Enloe is a pioneer in the field of feminist international relations. Her work has illuminated the exploitation of women, femininities and masculinities in political, globalization and militarization processes. From the factory floor to the lives of military wives – her work has been revealed how imperative it is to maintain a ‘feminist curiosity’ and to take the lives of women seriously.

    Find more here.

    This lecture was recorded and is available to view here.




  • PANEL: UNSCR 1325 and the Colombia Peace Talks: Women's Rights and Participation

    November 2, 2012
    Church Center for the United Nations, New York

    A panel discussion on women’s participation in the peace talks between the Colombian government and the FARC (Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia) took place in the UN Church Building on Friday, November 2, 2012. The event was hosted by the Global Network of Women Peacebuilders (GNWP), Cordaid and the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF). Panelists included Adalgiza Charria, La Fundación Mujer Arte y Vida/Red Nacional de Mujeres and Katherine Ronderos, President of Colombia Section of WILPF. The moderator was Cora Weiss, President of The Hague Appeal for Peace. Representatives of the mission of Colombia and Norway also made a few comments on the discussion.

    Read more here >>




  • CSW 56: WILPF Final Report and Summary of Events

    April 2012
    United Nations Headquarters, New York

    The 56th Session of the Commission on the Status of Women (CSW) took place at United Nations Headquarters in New York from Monday, 27 February to Friday, 9 March 2012. This session focused on the theme of "the empowerment of rural women and their role in poverty and hunger eradication, development and current challenges." Sadly, no outcome document (on agreed conclusions) was adopted by Member States. This was only the second time that the CSW had failed to agree on an outcome document. WILPF and other women’s groups expressed strong disappointment at the inability of parties to adopt an agreed conclusion able to promote and solidify the role of Rural Women in Development as agents for change and progress in their society.

    Read more here >>




  • WILPF at the 55th Commission on the Status of Women (CSW 55)

    March 2011
    United Nations Headquarters, New York

    This report summarizes WILPF’s monitoring  of the 55th Commssion on the Status of Women (CSW 55) from a Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Perspective. The official theme of CSW55 (Access and participation of women and girls in education, training, science and technology, including for the promotion of women’s equal access to full employment and decent work) did not specifically focus on the WPS agenda. However, approximately 70 events included main themes related to women in conflict and post-conflict. The majority of the WPS events were arranged by NGOs, but some Member States, such as Canada, Ireland, Lichtenstein, Norway, South Korea, and Turkey also organized/hosted events.

    Read more here >>