The Conflict in Kyrgyzstan - Complex and Gendered

Thursday, July 1, 2010
Author: 
Rochelle Jones
Countries: 
Asia
Central Asia
Kyrgyzstan
PeaceWomen Consolidated Themes: 
General Women, Peace and Security
Human Rights

In early June 2010, news began to emerge from southern Kyrgyzstan of an eruption of brutality and violence against ethnic Uzbeks living around Osh and Jalal-Abad in the Ferghana Valley. Uzbeks make up about 15 percent of the population in Kyrgyzstan, with more equal numbers of Kyrgyz and Uzbeks living in the Ferghana area.

Recently, organised gangs of Kyrgyzs raided ethnic Uzbek neighborhoods, setting homes and businesses ablaze and killing men, women and children. This is the worst violence seen in the region since 1990, when hundreds of people were killed. In June, around 100,000 people fled the ‘pogroms,' moving across the border into Uzbekistan. The Uzbek government closed doors to all except the wounded on June 15 after receiving 75,000 refugees in a short span of time.

Document PDF: 

AWID, Conflict in Kyrgyzstan - Complex and Gendered, 2010.