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Call to Action on 2010 Commitments

 

During the 2010 October Open Debate, commemorating the 10th anniversary of the adoption of UNSCR 1325, approximately 50 Member States reiterated the importance of implementing the WPS Agenda, ultimately committing to the adoption of UNSCR 2122, which looked to technical and quantitative implementation and review of the WPS Agenda. Overall, commitments focused on implementation of National Action Plans, with some noting the Rome Statutes specifically as a means of enhancing Rule of Law standards both internationally and domestically. Generally, statements referenced the necessity for increasing women’s political participation and increasing women’s numbers in crucial political roles and in key roles relative to the peace processes. Despite these specific commitments, most statements themselves were considerably broad and general with very few tangible action points included and very little if not non-existent focus on the need to finance the WPS Agenda on an international, regional, and national level. 

As the 2015 High-Level Global Review of progress made on the Women, Peace and Security Agenda approaches, it is important for civil society and governments to assess their implementation of the WPS Agenda based on their 2010 commitments.  

Find your country’s commitments in the list below!

 

Member State, United Nations and Civil Society Commitments
Austria

Policy

1. The development and implementation of National Action Plans is crucial to improve the implementation of Res. 1325. Austria was one of the first countries to develop a National Action Plan for resolution 1325. We will take the 10th anniversary of Resolution 1325 as an opportunity to revise our National Action Plan. Work will start beginning of 2011 in close cooperation with civil society and other line ministries.

2. Austria is committed to a continuous enhancement of its rule of law standards. The Rome Statute is the first international treaty to classify crimes against women, like rape or other forms of sexual violence, as crimes against humanity, war crimes or genocide. Austria is currently in the process of incorporating the crimes of the ICC Statute into its criminal code.

3. Austria commits to contextualize education, and pre-deployment training of its armed forces personnel in order to address specific operational realities in regions of deployment, including the impact of conflict on gender relations and the role and participation of women (on the basis of relevant UN Guidelines).

4. With its expertise in the development of a National Action Plan on 1325, Austria stands ready to work together in the context of a 'Twinning Project' with partner countries to support the establishment of National Action Plans on 1325.

5. Austria commits to deploy gender experts (e.g. Military Gender Advisor) to military components of peace operations if designated and posted by the international community.

6. Austria will continue to further strengthen its training activities on 1325, in particular in pre-deployment trainings for peace and humanitarian operations that are being provided for civilian and military experts from around the world by the Austrian Study Center for Peace and Conflict Resolution (ASPR), and increase its training efforts in the Austrian Diplomatic Academy in 2011.

UN Engagement

1. The newly-established entity "UN Women" has a central role in coordinating the UN's activities in implementing Res. 1325. Austria is committed to support UN Women and its efforts in making the newly developed indicators operational. In this context, Austria will provide UN Women with voluntary financial contributions.

Civil Society Engagement

1. Through the Austrian Development Agency, Austria supports and implements projects tailored towards, the implementation of 1325, in particular in relation to violence against Women,DDR, cooperation with civil society, for conflict prevention and peacekeeping. We will continue with these efforts. The Austrian multilateral development cooperation will keep a strong focus on women and children in crisis and post conflict situations.

Other/General

1. Including through its Special Envoy for International Women's Issues, Ambassador Dr. Ursula Plassnik, Austria will continue to promote the implementation of Resolution 1325 including in the UN, the EU, the Council of Europe and the OSCE. Austria is committed to dialogue initiatives promoting in particular gender equality and strengthening women in public life and dialogue activities. For example, Austria has established an international Network on "Promoting Female Leadership in Intercultural and Interreligious Dialogue" first meeting in June 2010. Certainly, I also commit to raise awareness in my bilateral contacts for Res. 1325, where appropriate.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Afghanistan

Policy

1. Key areas of success for the improvement of the lives of women have been in the spheres of political participation, education, and health. As we finalize results for our second parliamentary election, we recall that last month, millions of Afghans went to the polls to make their voices heard. In these recent elections, 406 out of 2,556 candidates were women. This compares with 328 women candidates from 2005, and ensures that women will at least fill all 68 seats, or 25%, allocated for women and will likely win additional seats. Women will fill at least a quarter of the Afghan parliament, nearing our MDG goal of 30%, and make up 18% of government employees. There are now over 1,000 women in Afghan National Security Forces. We plan to increase the number of women in the Afghan National Police to over 5,000 in the next five years. The presence of women in these crucial positions has made a significant impact. We are proud of their resilience and bravery in protecting our population.

Other/General

1. The Commitment of the government of Afghanistan and support of the international community have been the crucial factors for the achievements ofwomen in the last decade. During the London and Kabul Conferences, in January and July of this year, were affirmed our commitment to protecting the rights of women. As the country is moving towards seeking a new political framework for peace and reconciliation, it is vital to make sure that these achievements are sustained and the rights of women are protected in the future.

2. Resolution 1325 is not about rescuing women. It is not only about helping women who are struggling to overcome conflict, but about recognizing the unique role ofwomen as peacemakers, and creating opportunities for women to excel in leadership roles. What better place in the world to demonstrate the importance of this issue than Afghanistan. Afghan women are not damsels in distress. They have been victimized, but are not helpless victims. They have their own ideas about the needs of women in their country, and must be listened to and supported on their paths to self-empowerment. Honoring Resolution 1325, and subsequent resolutions 1820, 1888, and 1889, is not only a commitment of the Afghan government, but it is a necessity. While women are generally the first to be affected by conflict, let us all look forward to witnessing women as those who are the first beneficiaries of peace.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Policy

1. Afghanistan plans to increase the number of women in the Afghan National Police to over 5.000 in the next five years.

2. In terms of the Afghan reconciliation process, we are committed to the continued participation of women within the recently established High Peace Council in order to facilitate negotiations while women's rights will remain a priority in this process.

Monitoring 

1. Afghanistan is committed to further working with UNIFEM toward completing the CEDAW report in the near future.

 Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

Argentina

Monitoring

1. To continue making progress towards the objectives set out in resolution 1325 (2000), we wish to take this opportunity to reaffirm some of the commitments taken on by Argentina. First is the implementation of quantitative and qualitative tools to measure and to know in numerical terms — but also strategically — what the situation is with regard to participation of women in peacekeeping operations. On that point it is worth emphasizing that we are planning to publish in March 2011 the results of the surveys undertaken with the contingent deployed in Haiti. It gathers their experience in gender matters prior to deployment and looks at their experience with the effective implementation of a gender perspective during the mission

2. Another point is continuing to develop a database that gathers statistics on the voluntary participation of women in peacekeeping operations, including the number of women deployed and their roles in the missions, inter alia.

Policy

1. Further, we will move forward with programmes of training on issues of gender and human rights for contingents that are soon to be deployed. That will include developing curricula that consider the gender perspective in conflict resolution and peacebuilding, by integrating both women in the contingents and women in the local population.

2. Finally, in the Argentine National Centre for Joint Training for Peacekeeping Operations, the annual curriculum will include an international seminar on gender and peacekeeping operations, an initiative has no precedent at the international level.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Policy

1. Continue with an active policy for Dissemination, in order to guarantee the participation of women in PKO, since the access to information is a fundamental right in ensuring full participation with no gender discrimination of any kind.
Therefore, all materials and publications are sent to key actors in the field, both in Argentina and Latin America.
Within the Armed Forces, dissemination activities on gender issues and PKO are carried out in the military units all across the country, in order to promote fuller participation by women. These activities are carried out in an integrated framework with other gender policies in the sphere of Defense, and are cross-cutting to all actions undertaken by the Ministry.

2. Continue the development of data bases for volunteer participation in PKO, number of women deployed, roles within each mission, among others. These are indispensable tools to further strengthen public policy in those areas identified as lacking, as well as to move forward in the implementation of policies to achieve a sustained and growing participation of women in PKO.

3. Strengthen the role and tasks assigned to the designated Gender Focal Points, through training and enhanced visibility within each Mission. The reports presented by Focal Points are key elements for the development and review of policy.

4. Promote the quantitative participation of women through the implementation of positive action measures in preparing contingents to be deployed in peace keeping missions.

5. Progress in training programs that enable us to adequately train contingents that are about to be deployed in gender and human rights, developing curricular contents that include the gender perspective in conflict resolution and peace building, both as regards the women in the contingent and the female local population.

6. Assume an active and protagonist role in fostering measures and actions for gender equality at the sub-regional and regional levels. As an example, on the First Seminar on Lessons Learned in PKO in South America within UNASUR, we shared the experience of Argentina in this field and promoted the resolve to promote issues linked to the gender perspective in PKO for UNASUR in the document that will be presented to the South American Council of Defense (CDS).

7. Include in the annual curriculum at the Joint Training Center CAECOPAZ an International Seminar on Gender and Peacekeeping, an initiative that has no equivalent at the international level.

8. Appoint a Psychologist specialized in psycho-trauma as part of contingents in peacekeeping missions. Among his or her duties are the psychological education related to reinsertion in the social and family environment for all personnel.

Monitoring

1. Implement quantitative and qualitative tools to measure and identify in numeric as well as strategic terms what the situation of female participation in PKO is. In this regard, in March 2011, the launch of the results of surveys within the Haiti XI contingent is planned, which includes their experience in gender issues prior to deployment as well as the experience garnered during the mission on the implementation of a gender perspective.

2. Remove all obstacles thus identified, either formal or informal, through the use of mechanisms such as gender focus inspections.

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

Australia

Policy

1. Implementing Australia's national action plan on 1325

2. Supporting access to justice, including women and girl focused-legal aid and law enforcement

3. Strengthening the role of women in conflict prevention, resolution and peace-building

Financial
 

1. Increasing support to GenCAP and ProCAP

2. Rolling out the Analytical Inventory of Peacekeeping Best Practice for Addressing Conflict-related Sexual Violence

Commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Bangladesh

1. Women and girls suffer the most as victims of conflict, while in peace process they are mostly the ones deprived of the dividends. Women and girls are viewed as bearers of cultural and ethnic identities and they become prime targets of violence by perpetrators. Therefore, the onus lies on us to ensure that oppression against women and the girl child particularly gender related ones are stopped forever.

 2. As a nation committed to the maintenance of international peace and security, we take pride of our modest contribution of troops and police to the UN Peacekeeping missions, where recruitment of women in police and military amply delineates our commitment towards women peace and security nationally and in the maintenance of peace and security internationally.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010. 

 

Belgium

1. We commit today to revise our national action plan by 2012, in full cooperation with civil society and taking into account EU indicators, as well as the indicators that we hope to see adopted by the Council today. We further declare ourselves ready to consider assisting the development of such a plan by any country that would welcome our support.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Other/General

1. Goals in the plan include increasing the participation of women in decision-making positions at all levels of public administration, increasing the number of women in leadership positions within police and military forces, increasing the participation of women in peacekeeping operations and introducing a gender perspective in the training of personnel for peacekeeping missions. The goals also include increasing the knowledge and capacity of State services to apply resolution 1325 (2000) and improving cooperation with non-governmental and international organizations in the implementation of the resolution. Each goal in the national action plan has a timeline and indicators for monitoring implementation. 
 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Brazil

1. Improving the lot of women in conflict requires a combination of efforts both on the ground and in policy development implementation.Brazil is resolved to do its part. To this end, we will continue to actively support the empowerment of women in conflict and post-conflict situations in the Security Council, the Peacebuilding Commission and the General Assembly. This includes supporting efforts on the Council to adopt the indicators for resolution 1325 and to help improve its implementation on the ground. We are also committed to continuing to give adequate attention to sexual or gender-based violence in subsidiary bodies of the Council where mandated.

2. With regards to our peacekeepers on the ground, we will maintain our policy of zero tolerance in relation to sexual abuse and exploitation, and continue to ensure that all troops deployed receive adequate training in this area. The record of Brazilian troops in this regard makes us very proud and we are working constantly so that it remains so. We will also continue to contribute women to peacekeeping missions within our capabilities. Finally, in countries emerging from conflict where we have bilateral or trilateral cooperation projects, we will continue to seek to ensure that projects adequately contemplate the role of women.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010. 

 

Canada

Policy 

1. I would like to share with you some activities that we will carry out in implementing Canada's Action Plan. We will:
• ensure that our non-governmental partners delivering Canadian humanitarian assistance have codes of conduct related to sexual exploitation and abuse;
• develop training modules which address prevention and protection issues from the women, peace and security agenda for Government of Canada personnel being deployed to peace operations, fragile states or conflict affected situations; and
• identify Canadian specialists with expertise in women, peace and security issues, who may be called upon to support future peace operations, including peace processes

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. Canada commits to ensure that our non-governmental partners delivering Canadian humanitarian assistance have codes of conduct related to sexual exploitation and abuse that are consistent with the core principles in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Plan of Action on Protection from Sexual exploitation and Abuse in Humanitarian Crises.

2. In addition, Canada's Department of National Defence will develop and implement a policy framework which responds to Security Council Resolution 1325. It will include provisions for providing training on women, peace and security issues for Canadian personnel deployed to peace operations. 

3. Finally, Canada commits to identifying Canadian specialists with expertise in women, peace and security issues who may be called upon to support future peace operations, including peace processes.  

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Chile

Commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Colombia

Other/General

1. Strengthening the role and capacity of women and respect for their rights are priority areas for the Government of Colombia. As a member of the Security Council’s Group of Friends of resolution 1325 (2000), my country reaffirms its commitment to implementing policies, plans and programmes that broaden and strengthen the role of women in peacebuilding.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Croatia

Policy

1. I am pleased to say that Croatia has taken steps to integrate the gender perspective into the national security policy through its National Strategy for the Promotion of Gender Equality as and is currently developing its National Action Plan on the implementation of the resolution 1325, which is expected to be adopted by 2011. Under the leadership of its first female Prime Minister, Her Excellency Ms Jadranka Kosar, Croatia will continue to give its firm support to all areas of the women, peace and security agenda. We see it as a "gender-based peace agenda", which involves addressing the disproportionate effect of conflict on women and combating sexual violence. It is also abollt securing a full, equal and effective participation of women at all stages of the peace process, giving them an equal role in the prevention and resolution of conflicts, as well as in peace-building. The realization of these goals is a basis for safeguarding basic human rights and achieving human security and lasting peace.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy 

1. One of our goals, for instance is to keep increasing the deployment of women officers in peace-keeping operations.

2. The Government is also developing a new National Action Plan for the implementation of 1325 and related resolutions.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement).   

Denmark

Policy  

1.Denmark remains as committed to implement UNSCR 1325 as ever. Denmark was the very first country to adopt an action plan for implementation of resolution 1325, and we are currently implementing our second national action plan (2008-2013). In this plan an even stronger emphasis is placed on using the untapped potential of women, on involving women actively, on an equal basis, in peace building processes and decision making at all levels and with focus on visibility at country level.

Other/General | Civil Society Engagement 

1. As part of our international outreach Denmark and the United States will co-host an international conference on "Role of Women in Global Security» in Copenhagen on 29 and 30 October. The conference will gather political, military, business and civil society leaders and experts to share best practices and discuss how to expand and effectuate women's key roles in peacemaking and peacekeeping and in security-related activities. The goal of the conference is to help us all walk new avenues to enhance and improve women's vital role in the critical political, military and economic processes leading to sustainable peace and security. 

2. The conference will build on the concrete know-how from a number of countries that experience or have experienced conflict, including Afghanistan, Liberia and Uganda. One concrete example of how we have chosen to improve the conditions of women in a conflict zone is our ongoing work in support of women's networks and organisations in Afghanistan. Women's right to justice, strengthening the rule of law and strengthening civil society at the provincial level are fundamental tools in combating the negative impacts that the armed conflict has had on women in Afghanistan. These women's networks help build the basis on which women can play an active and constructive part in addressing the peace, reconciliation and reintegration process in the country.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Department of Peacekeeping Operations (DPKO)

Policy

1. With regard to police personnel, beyond the presence of a woman — who is seated behind me — at the head of our entire police force around the world, we have set up a plan to enable us to achieve a 20 per cent proportion of our worldwide police personnel being female by 2014. As for our 15 peacekeeping missions, three are now led by women, while none were a few years ago. That is a proportion of 20 per cent — 20 per cent of our peacekeeping operations are led by women.

2. Thirdly, we will continue to engage closely with troop- and police-contributing countries to help them prepare military and police personnel with the knowledge, skills, expertise and profile to effectively implement resolution 1325 (2000). To ensure that women are included among civilian peacekeepers, we will also press forward with efforts to improve conditions in the field and to realize the goal of harmonized conditions of service across the common system.

UN Engagement

1. Fourthly, during the early post-conflict phases, when peacekeeping missions have the largest presence and resources on the ground, we will continue to provide the leadership and coordination of an integrated United Nations response. Like everyone here, I am sure, we welcome the establishment of UN Women and the appointment of Under-Secretary- General Bachelet, and we look forward to the promise of strengthened field coordination to ensure that we deliver as one.

Monitoring  

1. Fifthly, we will actively support the strengthening of accountability and monitoring mechanisms for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The recently developed standardized indicators are a welcome development. The specific indicators related to peacekeeping are, in fact, part of our existing reporting templates and guidelines.
 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Estonia

Policy

1. I have the pleasure to note that last week Estonia adopted its national action plan for the implementation of the Security Council resolution 1325. Over the next four years the plan will help systematise and enhance our activities both at the national level and in regional and international organisations.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. Estonia, on its part, is about to complete its first National Action Plan for the implementation of the Security Council resolution 1325 and its follow-up resolutions in October. The plan aims to enhance and coordinate our activities in the field of women, peace and security.

2. Among its priorities, the plan reaffirms the focus on gender equality and the situation of women, particularly in the field of health and education. Special attention is paid to the participation of women’s NGOs in policy making and peace processes in Estonia’s development cooperation and humanitarian activities. It also includes steps to increase gender related expertise, as well as general awareness and support for the inclusion of gender perspective in crisis management at all levels through improved training and exchange of information. Another emphasis will be on expanding the possibilities for women’s participation in international civilian and military missions and peace processes.

Prior commitments made September 26, 2010 (see full statement)

European Union (EU)

Policy 

1. As for renewed and measurable commitments, we are looking to: - develop specific standard training elements to be used by EU staff and Peace and Security missions and operations, on gender and human rights in crisis management with the aim of increasing gender capacity and female civil and military participation in peace missions. By 2013 the EU will develop local strategies to implement SCR 1325 in its development cooperation activities in at least 60% of fragile, conflict or post-conflict countries.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Monitoring

1. As for renewed and measurable commitments, we foresee inter alia: To report regularly on the implementation of our women, peace and security commitments, using the 17 indicators I mentioned.

Policy 

1. To develop specific standard training elements to be used by EU staff as well as our Peace and Security missions, on gender and human rights in crisis management. 

2. By 2013 the EU will develop local strategies to implement SCR 1325 in its activities in at least 60% of fragile, conflict or post-conflict countries.

Civil Society Engagement 

1. To further boost women's participation in peace and security, we will implement specific capacity building projects to support civil society and women's network in crisis affected countries. For example on October 18-19 we will facilitate a seminar between European and African civil society organizations, with resolution 1325 as one of the two main topics of discussion. 

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Femlink Pacific

1. There’s a critical need to enhance and institutionalize the formal recognition of efforts of Pacific peace women in the resolution’s implementation. We therefore call for greater investment of technical and financial resources :

 - To strengthen our Pacific island regional women, peace and security architecture

 - To ensure women in all our diversities and at all levels connect with the UN on all aspects of peacebuilding

2. Women, peace and security must be defined as a core mandate of UN Women, and the operationalization processes ensure substantive civil society involvement including at regional and country level. We also call for support in 2011 for the development of a Pacific Action Plan on women, peace and security through a high-level multi-stakeholder conference to develop a broad framework to assist Pacific governments develop relevant national programs and strategies on women, peace and security to accelerate integration of 1325; and an annual high-level interactive dialogue on women, peace and security convened by Pacific-based UN resident representatives to hear directly from peace women.

3. Systematic reporting and official processes including by UN resident representatives on the integration of 1325 in national and regional security processes would enable peace women to also provide regular updates on our national women, peace and security context.

4. We look forward to working in solidarity and partnership to advance our collective efforts, for enhanced participation of women in decision-making including in security sector governance programmes, effective and regular gender-inclusive assessment and analysis for conflict prevention through a human security lens; ensuring the protection of women at all times, and ensuring that peacekeeping and peace support operations as well as dialogue in mediation efforts are informed by women’s peace and security expertise and experience.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010. 

 

Femmes Africa Solidarite

Commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Fiji

1. Fiji is fully committed to the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). This commitment is exemplified in our continuing efforts to meet the goals set out in the four broad thematic areas of the United Nations System-wide Action Plan. In the area of participation, our policies strongly encourage the recruitment of women in our security forces and their deployment, with equal opportunities, to peacekeeping missions. We support the global effort to increase the participation of women in United Nations police peacekeeping roles to 20 per cent by 2014. We encourage the provision of pre- and post-deployment training of our peacekeepers and welcome further assistance and expertise in this aspect of training.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Finland

Other/General

1. Finland aligns itself with the statement of the European Union to be delivered later today. In addition, I wish to offer some insights into what Finland has done and learnt during the past decade, and commit ourselves to future action with regard to: Participation of Women at all stages and all levels of peace processes, peacekeeping, peacebuilding andpost-conflict recovery; National Action Plans; and Work against impunity, including due attention to victims.

2. Increasing the amount of women also in the highest positions can wait no longer. The United Nations regional organisations have a responsibility to set examples and promote gender-equality, while Member states have a responsibility to provide and support female candidates. Accordingly, Finland commits to increasingly nominating female candidates.

Policy

1. National Action Plans on implementation of Resolution 1325 have proved to be the primary tool in strategic and systematic implementation. Finland's National Action Plan was jointly drafted by five Ministries and civil society partners, who are also actively engaged in its implementation and follow-up. As we look forward to the Council giving its support to the comprehensive set of indicators today, we commit to including the indicators in our own National Action Plan when revised next year.

2. We are willing to share our lessons learnt and experiences with other countries engaged in the preparation and implementation of their own National Action Plans. At the moment Finland cooperates with Kenya in drafting its National Action Plan through a twinning-project. Should the experiences from this programme be successful, we remain open to consider twinning with another partner country in the future.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. First, Finland commits to reviewing its current National Action Plan on 1325 and will, during the next year, prepare an updated National Action Plan in close cooperation with its civil society partners.

2. Finland currently supports creation of a National Action Plan in Kenya through a twinning project. Based on experiences from the project, Finland will stand ready for a possible new twinning with an interested partner. Finland will also prepare to assist in the follow-up to the implementation of the Kenyan Action Plan. 

3. Finland will systematically pay attention to the incorporation of aspects deriving from resolution 1325 into the mandates, political guidance and operational tasking of international peace operations, and will increasingly offer gender and human rights experts to international peace operations and missions. In order to broaden the effects of implementation, gender training to men in peace-operations will also be ensured.

4. Finland will further develop implementation of 1325 as a part of its comprehensive approach to promoting peace.

Civil Society Engagement

1. Second, Finland will stress the key role civil society has in promoting and implementing 1325. Finland commits to cooperating closely with NGOs nationally, and internationally, for example through our continued support to Femmes Africa Solidarite in its work in preparing and implementing National and Regional Action Plans.

2. Cooperation with civil society is vital also regarding Finland's commitment to increase its contributions to peace mediation and promote the effective participation of women at all stages and levels of formal and informal peace negotiations. Finland emphasizes the importance of nominating women in top-level functions in international organizations and operations, including as peace mediators, and commits to increasingly nominate and support female candidates to this positions.

Financial

1. Thirdly, Finland will continue its efforts to end impunity for the most serious human rights violations including sexual and gender based violence. This should always be done with attention to the victims, Finland commits to continued support to the efforts of the International Criminal Court, including its financial support to the Trust Fund for Victims, whose board of directors I chair.  

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement) 

France

Policy 

1. Implementation of National Plan of Action for the implementation of resolution 1325 adopted in October 2010. (unofficial translation). Mise en oeuvre du plan national d'action pour la mise en oeuvre de la résolution 1325 adopté en octobre 2010. (french version)

Commitments submitted via commitments form, September 2010. 

Gambia

1. As it seeks to fullfil the vital commitments contained in these resolutions, the Government of the Gambia, in collaboration with relevant stakeholders, has embarked on a series of actions and has been guided by the slogan “From commitment to action”. Key among these actions are the following. First, the Gambia is actively participating in conflict prevention, peace negotiations and peacebuilding in affected countries in our subregion and beyond. The Gambia has also maintained a central role in peacekeeping missions at the subregional, regional and international levels, and more than ever before, the outstanding performance of our female contingent has been widely recognized and applauded by recipient countries.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Germany

Policy | Financial | Civil Society Engagement

1. It is time to move towards more concrete action. What can member states and the United Nations as a whole do? The German Government will shortly present it's third implementation report on resolution 1325 to Parliament. While striving for the full and timely implementation of the entire resolution, and looking ahead, priority will be given to: 1) Increased participation of women in national, regional and international institutions and mechanisms, particularly in higher positions 2) Financial and technical support to UN gender awareness-raising campaigns 3) A gender perspective during and after the negotiation of peace agreements 4) The special needs of women combatants in demobilisation and reintegration processes

2. To achieve progress in these areas, Germany will set up a list of national and international priority initiatives. We will also continue to support international organizations and NGOs in promoting womens empowerment.

UN Engagement

1. The new USG, Ms Bachelet, whom I warmly congratulate, has our fullest support for the challenging task laying ahead of her. Mr. President, I am confident that with the realization of all the commitments made today we can and we hopefully will - achieve real progress in meeting the challenges ahead of us.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy | Financial 

Countries impacted: Several

1. Further commit to ensure pre-deployment training of peacekeeping troops and national
security and police forces (Reference i.a. OP 6, 7, ,9, 10, 11/1325; OP 1, 2, 3, 4, 6/1820; OP 2, 3, 5, 6, 7, 8, 10/1889)

Inter alia by the following new project/cooperation:
Supporting DPKO's project "developing a UN Police Standardized Training Curriculum on Investigating and Preventing Sexual and Gender-based Violence" for UN Police officers deployed to peacekeeping operations. (Funding of the project: 1, 7 Mio $; providing of professional experience by a female German police officer). (Time frame: 09.2010)

Policy | Civil Society Engagement |Financial

Countries impacted: Several

1. Further comit to contribute to programs/funds to support women's participation and for the fight against violence against women (Reference i.a. OP 10, 11/1325; OP 3, 4, 5, 7, 10/1820; OP3, 12/1889). (Time frame: 2011)

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement) 

Ghana

Policy

1. It is our belief that resolution 1325 (2000) will further enhance our country’s strong traditions on issues of peace and security, as exemplified through our support of peace missions and the activities of the Kofi Annan International Peacekeeping Training Centre. In this context, Ghana, in partnership with the Women Peace and Security Network Africa and the Canadian Government, has taken steps to realize the final stages of establishing Ghana’s national action plan on resolution 1325 (2000).  

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Hungary

Policy

1. It is a pleasure for me to inform you that we are finalizing an action plan concerning the national strategy on the implementation of the above-mentioned UN resolution. As incoming EU Presidency in the first semester of 2011 Hungary considers to maintain the current momentum through organizing a conference as a follow up to the series of events marking the 10th anniversary of the UN Security Resolution 1325.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see whole statement).

Iceland

Policy

1. Iceland's National Action Plan has been in place for almost three years. Preparations are under way to revise the plan for adoption next year. This will be done through a participatory, transparent process involving political leaders at the highest level, all relevant government agencies and civil society. The plan will contain specific goals, clear indicators and a transparent monitoring mechanism. It will also take fully into account pertinent Security Council resolutions on Women, Peace and Security. My government has also undertaken projects to highlight, strengthen and implement resolution 1325. Particular effort has been focused on women's empowerment. The Gender Equality Training Programme is an international training programme, run in cooperation with the University of Iceland, with the explicit purpose of promoting gender equality and women's empowerment through education and training. It is our hope that the programme, now in its. second year, with fellows from Afghanistan and Palestine, will in due course be recognised as an official United Nations University Programme, making it the fourth such programme located in Iceland.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. Iceland will commit to adopting and implementing a new and updated National Action Plan that focuses on UNSCR 1325, as well as subsequent resolutions. This will be done through a participatory, transparent process that involves the highest level of political leadership, all relevant government agencies and civil society. The updated National Action Plan will be published in 2011 and will contain specified goals, clear indicators and a transparent monitoring mechanism.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Ireland

Policy 

1. Ireland has been very active on 1325 and has long been reflecting the spirit of the Resolution in its external actions. In order to formalise this commitment, my department is working closely with other government departments, as well as members of civil society and academia, towards the development of an effective National Action Plan which we hope to launch early next year. This is our principal pledge here today.

UN Engagement

 1. I would also like to take this opportunity to note Ireland's warm support of Michelle Bachelet and the recently established UN Women. I am confident that this organisation's core work will benefit the lives of women and girls who experience or have experienced the atrocities of conflict, in particular the atrocities that target them specifically. International support of this body will be integral to its success. I am delighted to confirm the pledge made by Ireland to commitment to UN Women this year and look forward to hearing of its progress. I would also like to pay tribute to the excellent work of Margot Wallstrom, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence in Conflict. She has focused the world's attention on the recent, unacceptable spate of sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of Congo and, in doing so, is ensuring that action is being taken to bring the perpetrators to justice. Her commitment and determination in her role as SRSG will be vital in transforming the current landscape of impunity to a legacy of zero tolerance.  

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

 Policy

1. Present the findings of our cross-learning initiative to the UN on 25 October 2010, in the margins of the Security Council open debate on Women, Peace and Security, Ireland. This initiative brought together participants from Ireland, Northern Ireland, Liberia and Timor-Leste, with a view to learning from different country contexts and strengthening the multiple dimensions of South-South and North-South cooperation. As part of the initiative, high-level participatory events were held in Belfast, Dili and Monrovia. Each event gathered representatives from government and civil society groups to focus on the key issues of participation, protection and gender perspectives in policy-making. Having enlarged our understanding of the issues relating to women, peace and security, we hope that our initiative will give inspiration to others to engage in similar processes of exchange and cross-learning in order to reach our shared goals.

2. Finalise, adopt and launch, in early 2011, our National Action Plan on 1325. Work has been ongoing on this plan for some time and involves close consultation and cooperation between government, civil society and academia.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement) 

Kenya

Policy

1. In conclusion, Mr. President, I wish to reiterate my country's commitment to implementing Resolution 1325. Indeed, we are happy to report the ongoing discussions being carried out amongst stakeholders in Kenya to develop a Plan of Action for the implementation of the resolution. We support the Secretary General in his continued efforts to mainstream 1325 throughout the UN System. 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Liberia

Policy | Financial 

1. However, we have taken some concrete steps, and the plans for the next two years include the development of a strategy to ensure 20 per cent participation of women in the security sector by 2011. Presently, women constitute 30 per cent of immigration officers and 15 per cent of the national police. We also plan to earmark funding for long-term plans and the sustainability of the programmes; develop a fund-raising exercise and strategy and a donor roundtable to raise funds for the effective implementation of the plan; develop and implement a comprehensive communications strategy; initiate affirmative action processes that will address the gaps in women’s participation at all levels; and promote strong partnerships and strategic linkages.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

1. Governments like Liberia should look at the process of constitutional reform as an opportunity to set the legal groundwork for ensuring women’s equality in all areas namely, economic, social, cultural, political etc. We also believe that avenues must be created for the provision of human capital, support, and training must take place for women at various levels. In Liberia, majority of women are illiterate and we must institutionalized programs to make them first literate while incorporating human rights training and encouraging their increased role in decision making.

2. We think that women will be targeted for economic interventions. Not only are women asking for work opportunities, but this is critical for ensuring better conditions for their children, for also increasing their visibility and leverage in communities and household decisions and for the economic benefit of the entire country.

3. We also believe that we must work against discrimination at all levels and in that way, we know that we are doing 1325. Even within gender work there can be discrimination based on ethnicity, social status, background and even by the fact that someone has been a victim of sexual violence. Within gender sensitive intervention we must target all forms of discrimination. National governments should be supported to ensure that these baseline structures are strengthened at the community level. Only by formalizing and targeting these community networks can we ensure long-term sustainability and better outreach of our efforts.

4. We also think that countries must build a strong foundation of governance. In rule of law, gender justice must be key and taken seriously with paralegal system put in place to increase all women’s access to the legal system and targeted training of lawyers and judges on issues of women’s rights and sexual and gender based violence.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010. 

Liechtenstein

Financial |Civil Society Engagement

1. To underscore our commitment, we have contributed to the financing of the "Monthly Action Points" of the NGO Working Group on Women, Peace and Security (NGOWG), which highlight how the Security Council can integrate relevant content of resolution 1325 in its daily work, in particular on country specific issues. We hope that this can make a small contribution to the more general goal of effectively integrating the substance of the council's thematic work in its operational decisions. In addition, we have partnered with Switzerland to support the PeaceWomen project of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom (WILPF) to publish a handbook on women, peace and security. The handbook provides language derived from best practices and is meant to assist the Security Council in incorporating relevant substance of resolution 1325 when designing mandates for missions on the ground.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy | Civil Society Engagement | Financial 

1. Monthly Action Points on Women, Peace and Security. These Action Points highlight how the Security Council can live up to its responsibility by integrating thematic aspects on women, peace and security in its daily work and how each Security Council Presidency can provide leadership in this regard.The MAPs are provided by the NGO Working Group on Women Peace and Security. (Time frame: 1.11.2009-1.10.2010)

2. Handbook on Women, Peace and Security: The handbook will help the Security Council in its daily work to address the needs of women when designing mandates for missions on the ground. The handbook is compiled by PeaceWomen. (Time frame: 1.11.2009-1.10.2010)

Financial 

1. Financial support for the ICC Trust Fund for Victims: The ICC Trust Fund for Victims adopts a gender‐based perspective across all programming and specifically targets victims of all forms of sexual and gender violence. (Time frame: 01.03.2010)

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

Namibia

Commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Nepal

Policy  

1. As enshrined in its interim Constitution, Nepal is committed to setting aside 33 per cent of seats in Parliament for women. We are also committed to continuing an affirmative action policy in our civil service with a view to bringing women into the decision-making levels of the public sector. We are also committed to increasing women’s participation in our army and police forces.

Other/General

1. The Government of Nepal has adopted various measures to fight gender-related violence, establishing a toll-free hotline in the Office of the Prime Minister, a gender violence prevention fund, and gender violence control committees in every district in the country. We have also set up local peace committees in every district — empowered to address conflict at the local level and to mediate between conflicting parties — with at least 33 per cent participation by women. We are committed to establishing women’s and children’s service centres in police stations across the country for the expeditious investigation and prosecution of sexual and gender related violence cases.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy 

1. While making commitment to early finalisation and adoption of Nepal’s ‘National Action Plan’ on the implementation of the Security Council Resolution 1325 and 1820, Minister Rawal reiterated Nepal’s commitment to continue to set aside 33 percent seat in parliament for women with a view to ensuring women’s participation in the highest legislative body of the nation.

Financial | Other

1. He also committed that the government will continue targeting women participants and beneficiaries in local development, employment creation and frontline service-delivery programs in post-conflict situations with increased financing to gender equality and women’s and girl’s empowerment in post-conflict situations.

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010.  

Netherlands

Policy | Financial 

1. The Netherlands is committed to strengthening partnerships with men through financial support of training efforts. An active role for women is essential in interventions aimed at ending conflicts and increase security, stability and human security globally. But is not enough. We need the partnership of men. Male leaders who speak up about the atrocities of sexual violence; male commanders that instruct their uniformed services on how to protect civilians. The Netherlands and Australia will support a UN training module on sexual violence geared towards peacekeepers. We will furthermore support a human rights training package geared towards the national Congolese army. We will also continue in 2011 our joint Foreign Affairs/Defence training on women, peace and security for our own staff. We all need to be better equipped to step up UNSCR 1325 in the next decade. As partners.

Monitoring

1. The Dutch government has summed up its efforts and results so far in a booklet that will be launched next month: "The Dutch Do's on Women, Peace and Security." Ten years after the adoption of 1325, we can say that more perpetrators of sexual violence are brought to justice in the DRC. That more women take part in decision making processes in Sudan. That more Afghan women demand support in exchange for their vote. So these are results we can take pride in. But let's not fool ourselves...there is still a long way to go before the spirit of 1325 and following resolutions has fully permeated the work of the United Nations, member states and civil society. This is why the Netherlands pleas for strengthened accountability mechanisms for the implementation of our commitments expressed here today. We also believe that defining clear roles and responsibilities of UN members states, and within the UN system, in particular UN Women, the Department of Peacekeeping Operations, the Peacebuilding Commission and the Department for Political Affairs, will be conducive to stepping up our efforts towards reaching the goals of UNSCR 1325 and following resolutions. We are at the eve of a new decade of promoting women, peace and security. We are jointly responsible to now implement our joint commitments.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

New Zealand

Policy

1. But, like others, New Zealand can still do more, and it agrees that commitments are required to ensure the advancement of the 1325 agenda. We therefore commit to developing a national plan of action on resolution 1325 (2000). We commit to mainstreaming issues faced by women with disabilities in our implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). We commit to increasing the number of women in the higher ranks of our Defence Force and becoming more effective in retaining women in the Force throughout their careers. And we commit to working with others in the Pacific — countries and civil society — to ensure that resolution 1325 (2000) is better implemented.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Nigeria

Policy

1. As a signatory the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Dakar Declaration of last month, Nigeria has committed to accelerate the national and regional implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). The Declaration calls for a regional action plan within ECOWAS to support national action plans. ECOWAS will coordinate and collaborate with the United Nations Office for West Africa and with UN Women in this process. 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

 

North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)

Other/General

1.  We are adjusting our education and training, in order to changing mindsets, changing behaviours.

2.  We are looking at our processes, mainstreaming the principles of UNSCR 1325 in NATO's everyday business - its policies, programmes so that the benefits of the Resolutions are integrated in the organisation’s daily work.

3.  We are engaged with other international organisations, such as UN, EU and OSCE, to identify where NATO can add value, within its own framework and its own competencies, by identifying synergies, areas for the exchanges of best practices and cooperation. And steps have been taken to engage with civil society.

4.  We have also adopted a public diplomacy strategy, in order to engage to raise awareness of the issues - of the role of women in society, culture, the military and public life.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Norway

Policy  

1. We continue to increase the number of female Norwegian soldiers and officers, both in our standing military forces and our contributions to international operations. The next two commanders of Norway's national command in Afghanistan will be women.

Monitoring

1. Recognizing that we also have a way to go, I will now make sure our military operations rest on a gender analysis and adjust our operational demands accordingly. We will strengthen gender education of our armed forces and our police. And we will introduce a new system of reporting on gender and the role of women in field missions, starting in December with the Norwegian led Provincial Reconstruction Team in Maymaneh in Afghanistan.

Other/General

1.We will contribute experts on gender and gender-based violence to international peacekeeping operations. Last week we deployed such a team of experts from Norway's national police to the United Nations Stabilization Mission in Haiti, MINUSTAH.

Financial 

1.Norway will further strengthen our support to the United Nations work to promote and protect gender equality and the empowerment of women. Our proposed allocation for 2011 is more than 30 million US dollars.

Financial |  UN Engagement

 1. And finally, we also act urgently to boost the work of UN Women - and will support their new and welcome strategic partnership with the Department of Political Affairs specifically the project to increase women's participation in peace processes and improve the gender balance at all levels of mediation. The Norwegian government will immediately provide one million US dollars to this project.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. Develop concrete measures to increase the number of women in peace negotiations and ensure a gender perspective in the negotiations, based on our experiences as facilitators in peace processes. 

2. Support the implementation of National Action Plans, for instance in Nepal, where Norway has supported women’s participation in the peace process.

3. Build capacities to help accelerate the integration of a gender perspective in military operations. 

4. Contribute to strengthening the gender perspectives in Security Sector Reform initiatives.

Financial

1. Increase our funding to combat conflict-related sexual violence and provide better medical- responses to the survivors, with a particular focus on the Democratic Republic of Congo.

2. Continue to earmark funds for the implementation of resolution 1325 in our humanitarian funds and our peace and reconciliation funds. 

3. Continue to demand that all recipients of all humanitarian- , peace- and transition-funds report on the integration of a gender perspective and the implementation of 1325.

Other

1. Support and strengthen international efforts to increase the prosecution of perpetrators of sexual violence. 

2. Increase the number of women in the Military. 

3. Develop guidelines and training for the Military on protection of civilians from conflict-related sexual violence.

4. Increase the number of women in international police operations.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Palestine

Other/General

1. In conclusion, as we observe the tenth anniversary of resolution 1325 (2000), let us renew our commitment to action and shoulder our responsibility to take more effective measures to fully implement this important legislation by the Security Council. Let us move forward on our commitment to end all types of violence against women, protect them from the scourge of war and advance their participation at the highest level, for these are surely key components of peace and security in our world.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Portugal

Policy

1. Portugal strongly believes that National Action Plans constitute an important mechanism to accelerate progress in implementing this resolution. In this regard, we have adopted a National Action Plan in August 2009 which translates our commitment to the implementation of 1325 and corresponds to the consolidation of a gender equality perspective into national politics.

2. We have established under this Action Plan five main strategic objectives, translated into thirty specific objectives, for which implementation, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms are identified and developed. These are: To increase women's participation and mainstream gender equality in all phases of peace building processes and at all levels of decision-making; To promote capacity building of those involved in peace building and development aid efforts on gender equality and gender-based violence, as well as other aspects covered by UNSCR 1325 and 1820; To promote and protect women's human rights in conflict areas and post-conflict scenarios, having in consideration the need to: Prevent and eliminate all gender-based violence perpetrated against women and girls; Promote· the empowerment of women, both political and economic, and their participation in all post-conflict activities; To invest in and disseminate knowledge on issues concerning women, peace and security, including training and awareness raising actions among decision makers and the broader public; And finally to promote the active participation of civil society in the implementation of 1325 resolution and the National Action Plan. As I have stressed before, Portugal remains available to engage with the UN and other international actors in sharing experiences and good practices that allow us to move forward in this decisive area.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Red Cross

Policy

1. The lCRC's key message today is simple: existing rules of IHL must be respected. Where they are not, those responsible for violations must be held to account. The ICRC welcomes the importance the Security Council attaches to full respect for international humanitarian law. Indeed, better respect for existing rules of IHL would ensure much better protection for women and girls in armed conflict and other situations of violence. To conclude, the ICRC reiterates its commitment to the spirit of this resolution and more importantly, the ICRC will continue to promote, in its own work, the respect that international humanitarian law guarantees for women and girls.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Other

Countries impacted: Global

1. To protect and assist women and girls affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence e.g - providing food rations and household essentials so women can take care of their families. (Time frame: ongoing)

2. To remind parties to a conflict of their obligations under international humanitarian law (IHL) towards women and girls and to promote the implementation at these obligations
e.g. - reminding parties to conflict that sexual violence is a serious violation of IHL.(Time frame: ongoing)

3. To integrate needs, perspectives, and capacities of women and girls in all ICRC's activities:
e.g. - initiating small income generating projects to allow women to achieve economic self-sufficiency, providing psychosocial counseling to victims of sexual violence. (Time frame: ongoing)

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Rwanda

Policy

1. Our action plan has a number of major components. The first is our commitment to the prevention of violence and conflict. Our national programme commits us to dissemination of national and international laws dealing with women, the revision of all discriminatory laws and the identification of all existing discriminatory practices and adoption of strategies to address these challenges. We have also begun the ratification of international laws and conventions, and we are in fact in the process of domesticating those laws.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

 

Sierra Leone

Policy

1. Today, we can boast of a national action plan launched by President Koroma on 8 June, which was developed through a process that has been acclaimed by many as highly participatory and inclusive. This comprehensive plan includes a monitoring and evaluation framework to ensure that all actors are accountable for its full implementation. Prior to the launching of our national action plan, we also launched an overarching national gender strategic plan, with which the national action plan has been harmonized with a view to mainstreaming its implementation into the President’s Agenda for Change.  

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Slovenia

Policy

1. We all have a responsibility to implement resolution 1325 (2000). The development of national action plans is a key means by which Member States commit themselves to fulfilling that responsibility. I would like to report that Slovenia is about to finalize and adopt such an action plan. The goal is to interconnect existing national and international activities addressing a broader concept of women, peace and security in order to translate them into genuine political commitments, and thus accelerate the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and contribute to the empowerment and protection of women.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. I agree that each country should prepare an action plan for the implementation of the Resolution 1325. I would therefore like to inform you that Slovenia is about to finalize and adopt such a document. The goal is to interconnect the existing national and international activities by adressing a broader concept of women, peace and security, and by translating them into genuine political commitments. I am certain that this will significantly accelerate the implementation of the resolution in my country and thus contribute to our common goal of empowerment and protection of women.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)

Spain

Policy 

1. Continue implementing the Action Plan of the Government of Spain for the Application of the Resolution 1325, as well as the Action Plan Women and Peacebuilding in Spanish Co-operation.

2. Countries impacted: Spain

3. Enhancing the presence and integration of women in the Spanish Armed Forces and in decision-making bodies. Also, promoting the presence of military women in international missions. These commitments are being carried out throught several actions:
- Exhibitions, conferences and seminars on women in the armed forces and in missions and on Resolution 1325. These actions let the general public know better the situation of women in the Armed Forces, unveil new professional opportunities for women and generate social awareness of this activity.
- Legal changes to make it easier to reconcile professional life and family life: measures to support military women during pregnancy, childbirth and breastfeeding; establishment of nursery schools in barracks and military buildings.

Monitoring

1. Adoption of the II Monitoring Report of the Action Plan of the Government of Spain for the Application of the Resolution 1325.(Time frame: End 2010)

2. Possible development of monitoring indicators for the Action Plan of the Government of Spain for the Application of the Resolution 1325. (Time frame: 2011)

Financial

1. Support to UN Trust Fund in Support of Actions to Eliminate Violence Against Women (5 million euros).(Time frame: 2010-2011)

2. Support to UNIFEM is maintained: UNIFEM's work on Peace and Security in Latin America and the Caribbean (500.000 euros), development of indicators for Resolution 1325 (900.000 euros) and the International Women’s Commission for a Just and Sustainable Israeli-Palestinian Peace (300.000 euros). (Time frame: 2010-2011)

3. Support to INSTRAW's Gender, Peace and Security Programme is maintained, in particular for the implementation of Resolution 1325 in collaboration with governments, civil society and academic institutions. (Time-frame: 2010-2011)

Other

1. Integrating the gender perspective in all peace building activities, such us:
- Health care for local population.
- Education projects in support of civilian population.
- Contact with women's organizations.
- Recruitment of local women.
- Projects to protect the rights of women and children.
- Statistical information of deployed personnel.

2. Training the troops participating in peace operations on matters of gender and on Resolution 1325 and promoting the figure of gender advisor in operations. In this context, the Spanish Ministry of Defense is organizing a "Course 0" for Gender Advisers in Operations. The course will run from October 4th to November 31th, 2010. From the first quarter of 2011, it is planned to organize two courses per year.

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

Sweden

Financial 

1. A concrete example is the upcoming appointment of a special ambassador for the work of implementing UNSCR 1325. Other concrete examples from the field include Sudan, where Sweden is contributing some 45 million SEK, via UNIFEM, to a variety of organisations promoting women's role and participation. Sweden also contributes to UNIFEM in Afghanistan with some 62 million SEK, including for support to the Afghan National Action Plan for Women. Additional contributions are directed to the Swedish Committee for Afghanistan, 'and their programmes for girls. We have also been active strengthening the gender perspective in EU crisis management, for example we have sent gender advisers/focal points to EU-missions (such as EULEX/Kosovo, EUSEC/EUPOLIDRC and EUMM/Georgia).

UN Engagement 

1.Sweden welcomes the new UN entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UN Women) and we congratulate its first Executive Director: Mrs Michelle Bachelet. Sweden will support her coming efforts in a substantial manner, both financially and politically.

2. We welcome the efforts of the senior Police Adviser of the DPKO, including her struggle to increase the number of female police officers in peace keeping operations since this also responds to operational needs on the ground. Sweden is committed to continuing to sustain at least the same proportion of female police officers in peace keeping operations as in the National Police Service. 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Policy

1. Sweden commits to increase the number of Swedish women in police contingents in peace-keeping operation so that the proportion in PKO will be at least the same as the proportion of women in the Swedish Police Force.

Policy | Civil Society Engagement | Financial

1. Sweden commits to vigorously implement our second National Action Plan for 1325 for the period 2009 – 2012, as well as our development cooperation policies relevant to UN Security Council Resolution 1325.

2. Sweden believes that civil society has a key role in promoting and implementing 1325. Sweden commits to continue to cooperate closely with NGOs nationally and internationally. 

Prior commitments made September 23, 2010 (see full statement)

Switzerland

Policy

1. As Member States, we are also called upon to systematically apply a gender perspective in our political processes. Switzerland adopted a national action plan early on, which has proved to be a useful instrument. Our second and revised national action plan will come into force within the next few days. When participants leave the building today, I encourage them to take another look at the exhibit in the entrance hall. Walking on the red carpet, they will see which countries have adopted national action plans to date. And they will notice that there is still plenty of space for many more. 

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

Tunisia

Policy

1. My delegation is pleased to state in this regard that Tunisia is about to finalize and adopt its national action plan for the implementation of resolution 1325 (2000). This plan will, among other things, encourage women’s training in peacekeeping and peacebuilding so as to provide qualified personnel who could be deployed in field-based United Nations operations. It will also enhance predeployment training, with particular focus on the special measures to protect women and girls from gender-based violence. It will also endeavour to contribute to international efforts aimed at raising greater awareness about these issues through the convening of special regional events.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

1. In Tunisia, we have started elaboration of our national plan of action to implement resolution 1325, which will aim at the promotion of more women participation in peacekeeping in all levels. In addition, this action plan will consist in promoting the convening of number of meetings and conferences which will further advance this question in national and regional and international agenda.

2. The national plan will focus on the promotion of special training in international humanitarian law to Tunisian participation to peacekeeping operations. Such training will pay special attention to increasing awareness about the necessity to further protect women in conflict area and to take into account with due consideration their special needs. Tunisia will boost a stronger [course] of women’s emancipation and empowerment, and is committed to contribute actively to international efforts to address issue of protection of women in time of conflict.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010

Uganda

Policy

1. It is essential to empower women to enable them effectively participate in issues of peace, security and development. The Government of Uganda has taken a deliberate policy for empowerment of women through affirmative action initiatives. They include: providing for one Woman representative per district in Parliament, a third of local council executive positions to be occupied by women, and award of 1.5 points to female candidates for admission to public universities, as well as universal primary and secondary education for all children . Through these initiatives, women's participation in governance has been greatly enhanced.

2. Uganda launched its National Action Plan for Security Council Resolutions 1325, 1820 as well as the Goma Declaration in December 2008. The Action Plan highlights specific commitments and duties of the Government and stakeholders, identifies priority interventions for the short and medium term. It also apportions institutional responsibilities and establishes a mechanism for coordination, monitoring and reporting.

3. In the next 5 years, Uganda will be developing a comprehensive national policy on gender-based violence to guide prevention and response efforts in all situations, including in the humanitarian and development contexts. We shall also establish sustainable and integrated systems of collecting data on gender-based violence and improve access to justice for victims and survivors.

4. We are also institutionalizing gender-based violence training in key institutions for training of security forces including those involved in peacekeeping missions.

5. Uganda is already carrying out legislative reforms to address the remaining gender inequalities and violence against women in both public and private sectors. We are also working on integrating the principles of the resolutions 1325 and 1820 in the National Development Plan implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes.

Other/General

1. At the regional level, through the African Union, East African Community, and the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region, Uganda is committed to strengthening collaboration on enhancing women's participation and empowerment in conflict prevention, mediation, and resolution. We are convinced that women have an important role to play in ensuring durable peace, security, and development.

Commitments made on October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate)

1. Among others, Uganda pledges to make concrete commitments in the areas of developing a comprehensive national policy on gender-based violence to guide prevention and response efforts in or settings. Then, to establish sustainable and integrated systems of collecting data on gender-based violence. On orientation of our national security forces about resolution 1325, and integrate key principles of the resolutions in peacekeeping missions. As well as to institutionalize gender-based violence training in the [constitutions] of professional training of security forces. We commit to legislative reforms to address gender inequalities and violence against women in both public and private spheres.

2. Uganda commits to integrating the principles of resolutions 1325 and 1820 in national development plans implementation, monitoring and evaluation processes. We commit strengthening regional collaboration on matters of violence against women, in conflict settings through organs such as East African Community, international conference of the great lakes region and the African Union. We commit strengthening multi-sectoral coordination of prevention and response to gender-based violence and improving access to justice for victims.

3. Uganda commits to the implementation of gender-responsiveness budgeting as part of the annual budget process and ensuring that our national action plan on 1325 is implemented through multi-sectoral approach.We commit to monitoring gender violence and representation of women on decision-making committees and other bodies. We commit strengthening collaboration with civil society organizations in preventing and responding to gender-based violence. And finally, I would like to take this opportunity to invite you all to participate in the ministerial-level meeting on 29th of October 2010. And the Ugandan presidency of the Security Council to commemorate the 10th anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 1325.

Extract from statement at the "A 1325 Call to Action" event, September 25, 2010

United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)

Policy | Civil Society Engagement | Monitoring | Financial 

Countries impacted: Global

1. NDP, with UNIFEM (now part of UN Women) have supported the development of an independent global research institute with a primary focus on gender, peace and security. The commitment to this initiative, now referred to as the Institute on Gender Peace and Security (I-GPS), is designed to fill the urgent need to strengthen and bring together research on gender equality issues to respond to the needs of women in conflict and post-conflict situations. 

The goal of I-GPS is to generate leading global research based on experiences and realities in the field, strengthen research capacities in southern, crisis affected and transition countries. This will include research on the impact of armed conflict on women and girls, the role of women in peacebuilding, and the gender dimensions of peace processes and conflict resolution. This is needed to identify appropriate measures to support local women's peace initiatives and local processes for conflict resolution, to protect women and girls from gender-based violence; to identify and respond to the special needs of women and girls during disarmament, demobilization, repatriation and resettlement; and for rehabilitation, reintegration and post-conflict reconstruction. [Ref OP 2, 6, 8, 11, 13/1325]. This critical research and analysis can then be used by, policy makers and other stakeholders to translate experience based knowledge, into programmes and policies. I-GPS will foster dialogue between and bring together a community of researchers, policy makers, activists and practitioners.

UNDP, with some financial support from UNIFEM (now part of UN Women) have already made significant investments in bringing I-GPS to fruition. UNDP and UNIFEM (now part of UN Women) are fully committed to seeing the Institute complete its institutional arrangements by December 2010. New partners are most welcome to support this process of initiation and for I-GPS to become fully established. (Time frame: December 2010)

2. Since 2006, UNDP has taken the Women, Peace and Security agenda as a high corporate priority and institutionalized its commitment to it for some years. As a first step, in 2006, UNDP’s Bureau of Crisis Prevention and Recovery developed an overarching strategic framework, the Eight Point Agenda for Women’s Empowerment and Gender Equality in Crisis Prevention and Recovery, to make UNDP’s response to Resolution 1325 more systematic. It adopted this framework organization-wide in 2009. It has institutionalized this framework throughout the UNDP Crisis Prevention and Response portfolio, which focuses on programming in the following areas:

- Rule of Law and Security Sector and Justice Sector Reform, with a focus on access to justice for survivors of sexual and gender-based violence.

- Gender-Responsive Conflict Prevention that supports women’s participation and contribution to peace consolidation, including alternative community-led dispute resolution.

- Gender-Sensitive demobilization disarmament and reintegration.

- Reduction of Armed Violence with a concentration on the root causes of armed violence and its impact on women and girls.

- Mine Action with a focus on the impact of landmines on women and girls.In line with recent developments in the Women, Peace, and Security agenda, including the forthcoming Secretary General's Reports on Women's Participation in Peacebuilding, UNDP’s strategic focus areas in Crisis Prevention and Recovery include: Enhanced security of women and girls with a focus on rule of law and security sector and justice sector reform, and on improved multi-sectoral prevention and response systems to sexual and gender-based violence.

- Increased representation of women in post-crisis governance through the promotion of women’s leadership and participation in civil and political life.

- Improved delivery of targeted policies and services that they are more responsive and increase the larger economic, social and political opportunities available to women and girls.

- Enhanced [Gender-Responsive] Economic Recovery through support for women’s equal involvement and benefit from recovery policy and planning, in particular from local development, employment-creation, frontline service delivery and DDR programmes.To make available additional support for programming in these niche areas, UNDP has provided direct gender leadership and technical capacity in its field offices in crisis countries since 2009, through the assignment of Senior Gender Advisers to nine UNDP country offices, and one more to Haiti (recruitment in process). Existing core UNDP funds allocated to this initiative will be exhausted by the end of 2010. New partners to support continued leadership in this area would be most welcome. UNDP's Gender and CPR portfolio currently under-funded. (Time frame: Current and ongoing)

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

UNIFEM (part of UNWomen)

Policy

UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to the three‐year Joint Strategy of UNIFEM (part of UN Women) and DPA which seeks to:

1. Build, maintain and train a roster of high‐level women mediators to serve effectively in UN‐supported mediation processes, establish a roster of technical experts on mediation, gender issues, and conflict‐related sexual violence as part of the Mediation Support Unit’s extensive roster of specialists;

2. Develop training on mediation and gender issues, including sexual violence, for use by mediation teams, DPA field missions, UNIFEM (part of UN Women) field offices, and peacekeeping missions;

3. Develop guidance material on how to ensure women’s participation in all phases of a peace process and how to address conflict‐related sexual violence in peace agreements.

**Funding pending**

Civil Society Engagement

1. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to supporting women’s coalitions that call for increased participation of women at all levels of decision-making on peace and security.

2. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) facilitates the work of the International Women’s Coalition for a Just a nd Sustainable Palestinian-Israeli Peace (IWC) which brings together Israeli, Palestinian and international women leaders who speak in one voice on issues of peace and security. UNIFEM supports engagement between the IWC and regional and international decision-makers to promote the meaningful participation of diverse women and the inclusion of gendered perspectives at all stages of an Israeli-Palestinian peace process.

Policy | Monitoring 

1. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to the development, coordination and reporting of the global list of indicators on 1325 to assess implemenation and gaps on the women, peace and security agenda

2. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) has committed to tracking 6 indicators, along with with other UN entities, as mentioned in the Secretary General's Report on women, peace and Security, September 2010.

3. UNIFEM (Part of UN Women) is committed to ensuring that women participate in all aslpects of post-conflict peacebuilding and will support the efforts of the Peacebuilding Support Office (PBSO) to implement the 7-point Action Agenda linked to the Secretary-General's report on Women's Participation in Peacebuilding.

Civil Society Engagement | Financial 

Countries impacted:  Uganda, Liberia, Timor-Leste and Haiti

1. UNIFEM (Part of UN Women) is committed to contributing to the consolidation of peace and security in countries that have experienced conflict.

2. The UNIFEM (part of UN Women) “From Communities to Global Security Institutions” Project engages with security sector institutions to increase their gender-responsiveness and supports women’s organizations to develop innovative approaches to peacebuilding and preventing and responding to gender-based violence.

Policy | Civil Society Engagement | Financial 

1. Countries impacted: Nepal, Uganda, Afghanistan and Colombia

UNIFEM(part of UN Women) is committed to supporting Women’s Access to Justice in Early Recovery & Post‐Confllict. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) and UNDP's joint-programme on Access to Justice:

1. Supports effective strategies for women’s enhanced access to criminal justice, including investments in legal aid, law enforcement, and initiatives which provide the necessary infrastructure for women to report violations, including places of safety and access to transport. 

2. Supports meaningful and contextually relevant redress for women’s conflict-related human rights violations through transitional justice processes. 

3. Links women working in conflict contexts; both with each other and with practitioners and policy-makers at the global level in order to give greater voice to women on the ground in shaping post-conflict justice processes.UNIFEM (part of UN Women) hopes to include more countries in this programme, contingent on funding.

3. Countries impacted:Tajikistan, Rwanda, Morocco

4. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to Delivering Basic Services to Women through its 'Gender and Democratic Governance in Post Conflict Contexts' programme. Through this programme UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to:
- Build gender-responsiveness into design and delivery of public services

- Increase women’s influence in the governance of service delivery 

- Develop a global knowledge base on gender responsive governance for service delivery

Policy | Civil Society Engagement | Monitoring 

1. Countries impacted: Nepal, Kenya, Albania and Bolivia

2. UNIFEM (part of UN Women) is committed to increasing the number and effectiveness of women’s representation in parliaments through its' “Making Politics Work With Women (MP3) in Post-Conflict Contexts." At the global level, the programme will: 

- Set up a Global Election Watch Process, tracking women candidates where possible disaggregated by political party;

- Develop a global monitoring framework tracking number of women candidates in post-conflict elections, electoral systems, changes in women’s electoral success rate post conflict; numbers of women registered to vote and actually voting post-conflict; catalogue results and disseminate to key global, regional and national audiences to contribute to improvements in efforts to support women’s effective participation in politics post conflict.

At the country level, the programme will: 

- Support women’s organizations to conduct gender assessments of political party platforms pre elections 

- Support the development of women’s manifestos for advocacy with parties 

- Support long term tracking of the performance of elected men and women in addressing gender equality 

- Conduct civic education for building constituencies demanding gender equality from parties and government UNIFEM hopes to expand this progamme, contingent on funding, to include more countries which have experienced conflict.

Commitments made via commitments form, September 2010. 

United Kingdom

Policy

1. The 10 year anniversary has brought new momentum to this Council’s work on women, peace and security. The challenge now is to translate that into concrete action on the ground. The UK stands ready to play its part. The British Government just approved a new National Action Plan that sets out our future commitments, including specific strategies for supporting women in priority countries including Afghanistan, Nepal and DRC.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement) 

United Nations Secretary-General, Ban Ki-Moon

Other/General

1. I look forward to our continued collaboration in the coming decade. I am committed to working with the Council to ensure the full implementation of resolution 1325 (2000) and its related resolutions 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009) and 1889 (2009). Only by acting on our promises can we hope to create change.

Commitments made October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate) 

1. As the tenth anniversary approaches, we must move beyond rhetoric. I suggest some concrete commitments. 
- Above all, we must end the brutal and blatant violations of the bodies of women and girls during armed conflict and its aftermath. 
- We must put women at the front and centre of peace processes -- in negotiation and mediation, post-conflict governance and reconstruction. 
- We must create and implement the right laws, so that those who carry out such crimes are brought to justice. 
- We must develop National Action Plans to implement resolution 1325 (2000). So far, only 19 countries have done this. 
- We must review progress against reliable indicators. 
But all these commitments will not make the difference we need without increased resources. Civil society groups cannot plan and implement their programmes when funding is not enough, or is unreliable because of donors’ shifting priorities. 
I urge those with the power to mobilize resources for this work to do so. 

2. For my part, I will make sure that the United Nations system takes a more coherent, comprehensive and measurable approach to implementing resolution 1325 (2000). 
And I will continue to work for women’s empowerment, through all the means at the UN’s disposal. The newly-created UN Women, under the leadership of Michelle Bachelet, will bring women’s perspectives into all our work.

Prior commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement).

United States of America

The United States announced that they will be presenting a set of U.S commitments at the Security Council's Open Debate scheduled on the 26th of October.

Commitments made September, 25, 2010 (see here full statement)

Civil Society Engagement | Financial 

1. Looking ahead, I am pleased to announce two important steps the U.S. is taking to advance the goals of Resolution 1325. First, the United States will commit nearly $44 million to a set of initiatives designed to empower women. The largest portion, about 17 million, will support civil society groups that focus on women in Afghanistan. The women in Afghanistan are rightly worried that in the very legitimate search for peace their rights will be sacrificed. And I have personally stated, and I state again here in the Security Council, none of us can permit that to happen. No peace that sacrifices women’s rights is a peace we can afford to support.

2. Fourteen million dollars will also go to nongovernmental organizations working to make clean water more available in conflict zones, because in these areas, when women and girls go looking for water they are at higher risk of being attacked. Similarly, I had the honor of announcing the Global Alliance for Clean Cookstoves last month – another initiative that by our support can protect women who will not have to go out seeking firewood or other forms of fuel if we can revolutionize the way they’re able to cook food for their families.

Financial  |  UN Engagement 

1. Another 1.7 million will help fund UN activities, including Special Representative Wallstrom’s office, and 11 million will help expand literacy, job training, and maternal health services for refugee women and girls.

Policy 

1. In addition to this new funding, our second step will be to develop our own National Action Plan to accelerate the implementation of Resolution 1325 across our government and with our partners in civil society. And to measure progress on our plan, we will adopt the indicators laid out in the Secretary General’s report. We will measure whether women are effectively represented in the full range of peace-building and reconstruction efforts; whether they are protected against sexual violence; and whether they are the focus of conflict prevention, relief and reconciliation efforts. Measuring our progress will help ourselves be held accountable and identify those areas where we need to do more. Now, the National Action Plan and the new funding I’ve announced are two important steps, and we will pursue them with total commitment. But as several have already said: Action plans and funding are only steps toward a larger goal.

Commitments made on October 26, 2010 (see SC Open Debate).

Women and the Environment Organization (WATEO)

Commitments made September 25, 2010 (see full statement)